James Bond and the Gauntlet (Turnback) Cuff

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Sean Connery’s dinner jacket in Dr. No

Before we are introduced to James Bond’s face in Dr. No, we first see his dinner jacket’s satin silk gauntlet cuffs. The gauntlet cuff, also known as a turnback cuff, is a turned back cuff at the end of the sleeve that extends approximately to the first button. It’s a subtle Edwardian detail that saw a resurgence in popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. The cuff is mostly decorative, but it can add unique character to one’s dinner jacket, suit jacket, odd jacket or overcoat.

There’s almost no restriction on what type of jacket or coat can have a gauntlet cuff. Some say it’s a sporty detail and should only be worn on sports coats and sporty suits. These people may prefer them on heavier cloths like tweeds and flannels because a heavier cloth gives the cuff more relief from the sleeve. Others only favour them on dinner jackets because the dinner jacket descended from the cuff-adorned smoking jacket or they may think the gauntlet cuff is too flashy to be on anything else. A gauntlet cuff can be appropriate on almost any jacket or coat, whether it’s light or heavy, whether it’s formal or informal, or whether it’s single-breasted or double-breasted. Tailcoats and frock coats historically have taken gauntlet cuffs, but the cuffs on those were made in a different style from the cuffs that Bond wears.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Daniel Craig’s’s dinner jacket in Quantum of Solace

James Bond creator Ian Fleming was a fan of gauntlet cuffs and often wore them on his jackets, from double-breasted suit jackets to country tweed jackets. He dressed a number of his characters in his James Bond stories in suit jackets with gauntlet cuffs, including Sir Hugo Drax in Moonraker, Wing Commander Rattray in “From a View to a Kill” and Dr. Fanshawe in “The Property of a Lady”, for whose dress he describes as “neo-Edwardian fashion”. Fleming uses the terms “turnback cuffs”, “turned-back cuffs” and “turned-up cuffs”, respectively.  Fleming also specified “two new suits with cuffs” for James Bond to wear disguised as Sir Hillary Bray in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Cuffs in this case still likely mean gauntlet cuffs, since a British person would probably not refer to trouser turn-ups as “cuffs” like an American would. Fleming never specified gauntlet cuffs on Bond’s own clothes, and the literary Bond would probably not have worn gauntlet cuffs considering the minimalist tendencies Fleming gave him.

In the films, James Bond has mostly worn gauntlet cuffs on his dinner jackets. Sean Connery’s midnight blue Anthony Sinclair dinner jacket in Dr. No and his similar dinner jacket in From Russia with Love have midnight blue satin silk gauntlet cuffs with four buttons. Roger Moore wears an off-white silk dinner jacket made by Cyril Castle with single-button self gauntlet cuffs in The Man with the Golden Gun. Daniel Craig brought back the gauntlet cuff on his Tom Ford midnight blue dinner jacket in Quantum of Solace, and this time the cuffs are are half gauntlet cuffs (more on this below) in black satin silk with five buttons. Though this dinner jacket was an homage to the original Dr. No dinner jacket, Tom Ford is a fan of gauntlet cuffs and has them on many of the dinner jackets in his line. Bond’s only piece with gauntlet cuffs that isn’t a dinner jacket is the Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield in Live and Let Die, also made by Cyril Castle. The cuffs on the chesterfield fasten with one button. David Niven wears gauntlet cuffs as Sir James Bond in the 1967 Casino Royale film, for which his clothes were made by Ian Fleming’s tailor Benson, Perry & Whitley.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Roger Moore’s dinner jacket in The Man with the Golden Gun

Cyril Castle made many jackets for Roger Moore with gauntlet cuffs before he was Bond, as Castle was Moore’s tailor for The Saint and The Persuaders television series. Most of Moore’s suit jackets and sports coats in the colour series of The Saint have gauntlet cuffs with a single button whilst the dinner jackets usually have gauntlet cuffs with three buttons. In The Persuaders, Roger Moore wears a striped double-breasted blazer with single-button gauntlet cuffs.

There are a number of different styles of gauntlet cuffs, including some that the buttons go through. Gauntlet cuffs are typically a separate piece laid on to the end of an ordinary sleeve, which is obvious in the case of silk cuffs on a dinner jacket. When in the same cloth as the rest of the jacket, they are still typically made from a separate piece and not just folded back. It’s not impossible to have a cuff that is folded back, but if there’s a pattern it will not match. There are other types of cuffs on a jacket or coat, but James Bond only wears the kind that are laid on separately. Gauntlet cuffs work best on narrow sleeves, whereas on wide sleeves they may look or feel too heavy.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield coat in Live and Let Die

All of Bond’s gauntlet cuffs have an elegant curved shape—they all curve out of the way of the first cuff button—but there are slight differences in the way the cuffs are styled. Connery’s cuffs starts at the corners of the cuff’s opening and look the most integrated with the sleeve of all of Bond’s cuff designs. Moore’s cuffs start in from the corner to line up with the center of the button, so the corner of the sleeve opening can be tucked under the opposite end of the gauntlet cuff (Moore leaves the corner of the sleeve untucked). These cuffs, however, look less integrated with the sleeve than Connery’s do. Craig’s cuffs are only half gauntlet cuffs, in which the cuffs wrap around only the outside of the arm. They end at and are sewn into the seam at the front of the arm. The inside of the arm isn’t seen much, but this kind of cuff seems like a shortcut when compared to a full gauntlet cuff.

Comparing the cuffs: Anthony Sinclair, left; Cyril Castle, middle; Tom Ford, right

Comparing the cuffs: Anthony Sinclair, left; Cyril Castle, middle; Tom Ford, right

Though gauntlet cuffs are mostly decorative, they have one practical purpose: they protect the end of the sleeve. When worn out, the gauntlet cuff can be removed to reveal an unworn sleeve edge under the cuff. When made in contrasting silk on a dinner jacket, the cuff can be replaced. Half gauntlet cuffs, however, do not protect the full edge of the sleeve and are even more decorative than the full gauntlet cuff. All this said, the protective advantage to gauntlet cuffs is only beneficial on overcoats. The ends of the sleeves on dinner jackets, suit jackets and sports coats should not wear out because one’s shirt sleeves should be a little longer than one’s jacket sleeves to protect the jacket sleeves.

How James Bond Looks Masculine and Sophisticated in His Suits

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Nobody else combines masculinity and sophistication in the way that James Bond does. The masculinity comes from looking as much like the ideal man from the western perspective. This ideal man’s body is lean, strong and overall athletic. it is tall with broad shoulders, a muscular chest and small waist. The ideal man’s torso has a V-shape, which is masculine because it’s not a common shape for women to have. The sophistication comes from a well-tailored suit. A well-tailored suit can give man a more masculine shape, can show off a masculine figure or can downplay a masculine figure. All three of these aspects of tailoring can be desirable, depending on the body type one has. This article focuses on the suits that Bond wears that best deal with a masculine but elegant silhouette.

Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits emphasise his masculine physique whilst downplaying some aspects of it. Connery doesn’t need much help in the shoulders, and his jackets have soft shoulders that follow his shoulder line but have a little structure to smooth out the shoulders to give them more elegant lines. The chest has a full, swelled shape to build on the strength in the chest. There are two buttons on the front of the jacket in a low stance to create a deep “V” on the front of the jacket to highlight Connery’s masculine shape.

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Because Sean Connery had a very athletic physique, Anthony Sinclair decided to soften it by not making the waist as suppressed as he normally would. A tightly suppressed wasp waist in the normal Savile Row fashion with Sean Connery’s fabled 13-inch drop would look neither elegant nor manly. The waist on Connery’s jackets is still very shaped, but it’s not tight. Too much waist suppression can make one look feminine, and stressing an overly athletic physique detracts from the elegance of a suit by making someone look too much like a body builder.

I find that Sean Connery’s narrow lapels in the 1960s also help drawn attention to his large chest. Narrow lapels make the chest look wider by showing more expanse of chest. Connery’s considerably wider lapels in Diamonds Are Forever cover two-thirds of his chest, giving him a visually narrower chest.

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For the slighter Bonds Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan, large shoulders on their jackets give them a stronger look. If they wore suits with natural shoulders they wouldn’t have the necessary imposing look that an action hero needs. The shoulders on many of Dalton’s suit jackets, however, were too strong and draw too much attention to themselves. Brosnan’s Brioni suits, however, gave him a more natural look that was still built-up. Additionally, the two buttons in a low stance on Dalton’s suits, like on Connery’s, give him a more athletic look by drawing attention to the chest.

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Daniel Craig takes a different approach to looking masculine and strong in his suits. Whilst Connery’s suits work with his body, Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall fight against his body. They have the goal to make him look like he worked out so much that his muscles are bursting out of his suit. He wears suits meant for someone with a 38-inch chest and more likely has a chest around 40 inches. Narrow shoulders on the jackets allow Craig’s deltoids to push the sleeves out a little. A too-small chest splays open to give the impression Craig’s chest muscles are bigger. Ripples at the waist further the impression that Craig is turning into the Hulk. Unlike Connery’s method of looking stronger, Craig’s method is devoid of elegance and sophistication. Clean lines, not ripples, are a mark of refinement.

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Craig’s method also does not achieve its goal to make him look more muscular. Suits—particularly Tom Ford’s—are very structured and can’t stretch like a t-shirt or jumper to show off the form of his muscles. Knitted, not woven, garments are best used to show off one’s body. A suit that is too small ripples and pulls the same way whether one is too muscular or too fat for it. And putting Craig in a suit that is too small for him has the effect of making him look smaller, not bigger. This method would work better with someone who is genuinely more imposing with a chest much larger than Craig’s 40 inches. Narrow shoulders downplay his breadth and the V-shape of his torso. The short jacket length makes his torso look smaller overall. The positive effect of a short jacket length, however, is that it makes Craig look taller in wide shots by extending the perceived length of his legs. That’s the one way his suits in Skyfall make him look more masculine. However, the lower rise on his trousers partially negates the height benefits of the shorter jackets by shortening his lower half. The suits in Spectre mostly have the same problems but to a lesser extent than in Skyfall. The shoulders in Spectre are wider in comparison to Craig’s body and allow the sleeves to hang more elegantly.

Like on Connery’s 1960s suits, most of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall and Spectre have narrow notched lapels that make Craig’s chest look larger. But one of Craig’s suits in Spectre has wide peaked lapels: the black herringbone Tom Ford “Windsor” suit. These wide peaked lapels have a different effect from wide notched lapels. Peaked lapels point up and out, extending the width of the chest and shoulders. The belly of the lapels added perceived depth to the chest. Wide notched lapels with a higher and more horizontal gorge, as well as some belly, can counter the narrowing effect of wide lapels.

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Though the right tailoring can make a man look more masculine or more sophisticated, clothes can not add the attitude, charisma and personality needed to truly be like James Bond.

Black Bridge Coat, Sunglasses and Gloves in Spectre

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Over his black herringbone peaked lapel three-piece suit, James Bond wears a black double-breasted bridge coat that helps him fit in with the gangsters at Sciarra’s funeral in Spectre. The coat from Tom Ford is made of lighter topcoat-weight brushed wool. It is in a button four, show four configuration and has an ulster collar with a buttonhole on each rever, slash pockets for hand-warming, a button-on half belt in the back, a rear vent and three cuff buttons. The coat is cut with straight shoulders and has set-in sleeves.

The bridge coat has military origins and is like a cross between a pea coat and a greatcoat. It is like a pea coat in most of its design but has the full below-the-knee-length of the greatcoat. Bridge coats, like pea coats, have a straight cut, but the bridge coat’s belt in the rear gives it some waist suppression. The belt on Bond’s coat takes in the waist significantly, but the cut of coat does not not have much waist suppression. Though bridge coats for the military have gilt buttons, Bond’s bridge coat is adapted for civilian use with black horn buttons. For a less gangster-esque look than a black bridge coat, navy is a great colour for a bridge coat.

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Though the bridge coat and great coat are very similar, there are a few notable differences. Bridge coats have the buttons on the front in a rectangular formation, and those buttons are separate from the buttons under the collar. Greatcoats have the buttons in a keystone formation, and the buttons are spaced evenly up to the collar. Bridge coats, like pea coats, typically have slash pockets whilst greatcoats have straight or hacking flap pockets. Both often have a belt in the back. Daniel Craig’s double-breasted black overcoat in Quantum of Solace, by contrast to the coat in Spectre, is a greatcoat.

Daniel Craig’s Bond usually only fastens one button on his outer coats, and on this coat he only fastens the second button from the top. It is an odd way to fasten a coat for warmth, and it’s an odd fashion for someone who was once in the military.

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With the bridge coat at the funeral, Bond wears the Tom Ford “Snowdon” sunglasses in the colour “Havana”, which is a mottled dark brown. The lenses look brown, but they are actually greyn. These sunglasses will be auctioned at the Spectre auction at Christie’s in London on the 18th of February and are expected to fetch £4,000 to £6,000.

Bond also wears black leather driving gloves with his bridge coat and black suit. The gloves are the appropriately named “Fleming” model from Dents. The glove has perforations on the outsides and insides of the fingers, gathers on the underside of the glove’s opening and a band that fastens with a popper on the topside of the glove’s opening. Bond later wears these gloves when he visits Lucia, but he does not wear them for their intended purpose—driving—during the car chase with Hinx.

Tan Suede Jacket from Matchless in Spectre

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When in Morocco in Spectre, Bond needs a cool jacket to conceal his firearm. For this purpose he wears a tan lightweight suede jacket from Matchless London. Matchless calls this jacket the “Craig Blouson”, but this is technically not a blouson since the waist is not drawn in. The jacket is longer than waist-length and sits over the top of the hips to cover the waistband of the low-rise trousers. The jacket has a zip front, side pockets and an ecru viscose rayon lining. The collar is two pieces and has a hook to close with. Bond wears the collar up in back to protect his neck from the sun but folded down a little in front to keep it away from his face. An unlined jacket would likely be a better choice for the hot weather in Morocco.

Under the suede jacket when Bond arrives in Morocco, Spectre brings a new take on a Bond staple: the navy polo. Bond’s polo from Tom Ford is made of a 57% cotton and 43% viscose rayon blend pique knit. Rayon makes the polo lighter than if it were just cotton, but cotton is stronger and more breathable. Instead of the usual buttoned placket, the shirt has an open V-neck. The collar and sleeve hems are a fine rib knit, and the shirt’s hem has a thick ribbed band like on a jumper. The polo has a close fit everywhere, and the mid-bicep-length sleeves perfectly curve around Bond’s shoulders and excellently show off his arms.

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Later in the film on the train across Morocco, Bond switches the polo for a blue and white end-on-end linen shirt. This shirt is mostly hidden under the jacket, but it has a short point collar that curls up. Medium blue buttons fasten down a plain placket, and there is no pocket on the front. There are darts down the front at the sides of the front panels for a very tapered waist. Front darts are usually only on women’s shirts, which help the shirts fit closely around their anatomy. Men do not need front darts in their shirts, and tapering at the sides with darts for the small of the back are enough to fit a shirt closely to a man’s physique. This shirt matches the “Morton” model from Orlebar Brown, who made the blue swimming trunks for Skyfall. The “Morton” has long sleeves with short, pointed cuffs that have two buttons around the circumference to fasten the cuff at different sizes.

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The khaki cotton gabardine chinos from Brunello Cucinelli are the same trousers that Bond wears later with his light brown Brunello Cucinelli jacket. They have a flat front, a low rise and narrow straight legs. Bond wears the bottoms rolled up for a casual look. The chinos are pressed with a crease down each leg, but the crease is faded and hardly noticeable. Bond wears the chinos with a brown woven leather belt from Brunello Cucinelli. The belt has a solid brown leather tab at the end with holes for the buckle to feed through. It is not the type of belt where the whole piece is braided and the buckle feeds through the braid.

The sunglasses are the Tom Ford Henry model. Bond’s boots are the Kenton Suede Boots from J. Crew in a tan colour appropriately called “Sahara”. They have five pairs of eyelets and three pairs of speed hooks, a plain toe and red mini-lug soles. The boots were likely chosen because they closely match the jacket, but the match looks too forced. Oiled leather desert boots could have been a better choice.

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The outfit of a tan jacket, navy polo and khaki chinos pays homage to a similar outfit that James Bond wears on a previous trip to Tangier in The Living Daylights. Though Timothy Dalton’s outfit in The Living Daylights had the right idea—and the execution is fine for the 1980s—it’s not as unique as Craig’s similar outfit in Spectre is. The clothes in Spectre are much higher quality and more interesting. The return of the suede jacket in Spectre also recalls the numerous suede jackets Roger Moore wears in his 1980s James Bond films.

Anthracite Damier Three-Piece Suit in Spectre

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When Bond visits Q’s lab at the end of Spectre, he wears a sporty checked three-piece suit from Tom Ford. Bond has worn few sporty three-piece suits in the series, and this one follows the iconic three-piece glen check suit from Goldfinger loosely in idea but neither in execution nor iconography. Like the glen check suit in Goldfinger, it’s a suit for relaxed Bond rather than a 00-agent ready for business. And being a three-piece, it shows shows that Bond is a man who appreciates fine clothes even when he doesn’t need to dress up. Though it’s a sporty suit, the dark grey colour, smooth finish and waistcoat also make this a fairly dressy suit, but it’s not a business suit.

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The suit is anthracite—a very dark charcoal—with a pin-point damier check. A true damier is a checkerboard pattern whilst this pattern is more like a variation on the shepherd check. It’s a check made up of pin dots with a 32-yarn repeat in both the warp and the weft. For 16 of the 32 yarns in each direction there is a yarn that creates a line of white pin dots every four yarns. The overall effect is a dark grey check. The content of the suiting is 70% wool, 18% silk and 12% mohair. The silk and mohair give the cloth a subtle sheen and increase its formality.

Like the two-piece suits in Spectre, this suit is the O’Connor model designed by Spectre’s costumer designer Jany Temime along with Tom Ford. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open. Like the other O’Connor suit jackets, this suit jacket is too short and too tight. This suit jacket is tighter than the rest because of the waistcoat underneath.

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The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button. The bottom button is placed on the cutaway portion of the waistcoat, and the bottom button and buttonhole do not line up. The waistcoat has four curved “barchetta” welt pockets. The low-rise suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets and narrow straight legs.

Under the suit, Bond wears a sky blue cotton poplin shirt with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit in the small of the back. He matches the shirt with a folded sky blue handkerchief in his suit jacket’s breast pocket. The tie is solid black—in what may be a panama weave—and tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond’s shoes are likely the Crockett & Jones Norwich model: black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

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The Navy Blue Sharkskin Suit in Spectre

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When James Bond enters his room at Franz Oberhauser’s desert crater lair in Spectre, he finds a blue sharkskin suit laid out on the bed for him. Bond is expected to wear this suit when joining Oberhauser for afternoon drinks. The suit from Tom Ford is in the same O’Connor model as most of the other suits in Spectre, even though this is technically not Bond’s own suit but rather one that was only provided for him. This could give an excuse for this suit’s fit problems, but that excuse doesn’t hold up considering all of the O’Connor suits in the film fit the same way.

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The suiting is a 100% wool super 110s sharkskin (also known as pick-and-pick) woven with dark and light blue yarns for an iridescent look. Though there’s no mohair content in the cloth, the different blues in it give it a shiny 1960s look. Depending on lighting, the suit can look anywhere from dark navy to medium blue. In person, the suiting is brighter and more vivid than it looks on screen. This suit is perfect for social occasions, both during the day under the sun and in the evening under artificial light. The cloth is too shiny for most business.

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Being the O’Connor model designed by Spectre‘s costumer designer Jany Temime and Tom Ford, the cut and details match many of the other suits in the film. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway for a dynamic “X” on the front of the jacket. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open.

The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise, which reveals a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The trousers with this suit look even shorter than the trousers in the rest of the film and don’t even touch the shoes. High-water trousers don’t serve a purpose in the desert!

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With this suit Bond wears a white cotton poplin shirt with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit in the small of the back. The shirt has a close fit overall, but it’s not too tight like the suit jacket is. He matches the shirt with a folded white handkerchief in his suit jacket’s breast pocket. The tie is dark navy silk repp in a colour Tom Ford calls “ink”. It is darker than the suit, but the hue is the same as the suit’s so it matches well. The tie is 7.5 cm/3 inches wide, and it’s tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

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Crockett & Jones Norwich

This suit is likely the same suit that is in the gun barrel sequence at the start of the film.

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Some of the images here have been colour-corrected due to the filters on the film that make it look overly warm.

The Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Crombie Coat in Spectre

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For visits to M’s office and to Q’s lab in Spectre, James Bond wears a grey herringbone track strip suit from Tom Ford. Spectre continues in the long history of Bond films where Bond dresses in stripes in London. This suit’s cloth exchanges the standard pinstripe and chalk stripe for a cloth with more interest in the stripe and in the weave. The cloth is woven in a narrow herringbone weave, which changes direction every 16 yarns. The cloth is woven with medium grey in the warp and charcoal grey in the weft for an overall vibrant dark grey. There is a white track stripe where the herringbone changes direction. The track stripe is two single-yarn pinstripes spaced a yarn apart. Because the stripe is part of the herringbone weave, it has a soft chalk-stripe-like appearance. The suiting is made of a blend of worsted wool, silk and mohair.

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The suit is the O’Connor model designed by costume designer Jany Temime in collaboration with Tom Ford for Spectre, and it has the same cut and the same details that the other three O’Connor suits in the film have. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway and reveal a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond ungentlemanly wears the last button open.

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The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise and are hemmed with no break, which means they are very short and cover little of the shoes.

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With the suit, Bond wears two different shirts and ties from Tom Ford. When he first visits M’s office he wears a white cotton poplin shirt with a medium-dark grey tie and no pocket handkerchief. Later when he goes to Q’s office he wears a sky blue shirt with a matching sky blue folded pocket handkerchief and a navy tie. The navy tie is a deep, rich blue and towards indigo on the spectrum. Tom Ford calls this tie “navy”, as opposed to the similar “ink” tie that Bond wears later in the film. The shirts are both in the same style and have a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit. The ties both are silk repp and 7.5 cm/3 inches wide. The sky blue shirt and navy tie are much more flattering to Craig’s complexion than the white shirt and grey tie since he looks better with less contrast.

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Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Over the suit Bond wears a navy “Crombie” coat, which is the name commonly used for a three-quarter-length chesterfield coat. Tom Ford does not use the name “Crombie” for this coat, which is trademarked by the British brand Crombie. However, this style of coat is most popularly associated with the Crombie brand. The coat is made of a luxurious 51% cashmere and 49% silk blend. It has structured padded shoulders and a darted front for a closely fitted silhouette. There are three buttons down the front, which are covered with a fly. Bond only fastens the coat’s middle button. The coat is detailed with straight flap hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket, a single vent and three buttons on the cuffs. The collar is cotton moleskin in a slightly lighter and more vivid blue than the rest of the coat. When Bond is on his way to Q’s lab he wears a long navy scarf warpped twice around the neck and looped over in front.

The crombie coat, from a cut scene in Spectre

The crombie coat, from a cut scene in Spectre

Bond rudely keeps his coat on in M’s office but takes it off in Q’s office. Neither Bond nor M appear to be in a rush in M’s office, so he has no excuse for wearing it. It makes the same suit look more different in the two separate scenes, when Bond really should have put on a different suit the next day. In Goldfinger, For Your Eyes Only, The Living Daylights and GoldenEye, Bond wears different suits on different days for his office visits and should have continued that tradition here.

The Blue Prince of Wales Suit in Spectre

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In Spectre‘s pre-title sequence in Mexico City, James Bond wears a blue Prince of Wales check wool suit from Tom Ford. A Prince of Wales check in this usage of the term is a glen check with an overcheck, which may also be called a windowpane. The glen check is medium blue and black whilst the overcheck is light blue in a more vivid tone in the warp than in the weft. A black and blue check makes this unusual compared to the more typical black and white and black and grey variations that Bond has worn in the past. The overcheck is a bold six yarns wide, which makes it the dominant pattern on the suit. Ordinarily, overchecks on a Prince of Wales check are thinner and stand out less. Because the overcheck on this suit is so dominant, it wouldn’t be inappropriate to call this a windowpane suit, but that oversimplifies what the suit’s pattern truly is.

Since the base of the suit’s cloth is medium blue and black, the colours blend together into an air force blue. The colour of the suit is still lighter and more vivid than an ordinary blue suit, but the colour looks perfect for Mexico City’s warm weather and helps Bond to stand out from the crowd during the Day of the Dead festival. The lighter blues in the suit are flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion and bring out his blue eyes.

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The jacket is the O’Connor model designed by costume designer Jany Temime in collaboration with Tom Ford for Spectre, with straight, padded shoulders that have roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway and reveal a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open.

The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise and are hemmed with no break, which means they are very short and cover little of the shoes.

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With the suit, Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit. A light blue shirt would make this outfit more flattering to Daniel Craig’s complexion, but it would have to be a very pale blue so there is contrast between the suit and shirt. The stark white shirt overpowers Craig’s complexion. The tie is a silk repp in medium blue, which Tom Ford call their “blue” shade. It is 7.5 cm/3 inches wide. The blue is a close match with the hue of the suit, which makes it a good match in the classic Connery Bond mode. Bond ties it in a narrow four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears a folded white linen handkerchief in his breast pocket.

The shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles. The socks are a rather boring and unstylish black. Dark blue would have been a better choice, since it would extend the line of the too-short trouser legs.