The Untraditional Ivory Dinner Jacket in Spectre


After a 30-year gap, James Bond finally wears an ivory dinner jacket again in Spectre. A View to a Kill was the last film that featured Bond in an ivory dinner jacket. Daniel Craig’s dinner jacket in Spectre is made in Tom Ford’s “WIndsor” model, which is Ford’s most famous model, characterised by its wide peaked lapels with belly and aggressive shoulders. The look is inspired by suits from the 1940s as well as by British designer Tommy Nutter’s suits. Though the overall cut of this dinner jacket in Spectre is classic-inspired, the details are not.

Bond’s visit to Morocco in Spectre necessitated the return of the ivory dinner jacket. Costume designer Jany Temime is quoted about this dinner jacket in the book Blood Sweat and Bond: Behind the Scenes of Spectre curated by Rankin:

I told Sam [Mendes] I couldn’t do a better tuxedo than Skyfall. But then I thought Morocco deserved that colonial touch, a feeling of Casablanca where time stops and everything is so iconic.

Temime is also quoted on the James Bond 007 Facebook page saying something similar about this dinner jacket:

It was very hard to do better than the Skyfall blue tuxedo but I took my inspiration from Humphrey Bogart in the film Casablanca and Morocco. Daniel added the red carnation buttonhole and it looked absolutely sublime.

Humphrey Bogart’s ivory double-breasted, shawl-collar dinner jacket in Casablanca is the most famous ivory dinner jacket in cinematic history (which Emilio Largo copied in Thunderball), and Bond’s trip to Morocco along with his status of “black tie master” gave him an obligation to honour that piece. Though a shawl collar would have brought more of the spirit of Casablanca to this dinner jacket, Temime instead went with peaked lapels to follow the Bond style established by Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Goldfinger. The wider, more classic peaked lapels on this Tom Ford dinner jacket actually make it more closely resemble Sean Connery’s dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever than the jacket in Goldfinger. Though the red carnation makes us think of Goldfinger, the dinner jacket itself is quite different from any dinner jacket Bond has previous worn.

The dinner jacket is made from a breathable silk and viscose faille. It is cut with a shaped—but close—chest and a suppressed waist. The shoulders are straight with a healthy amount of of padding and are finished with roped sleeveheads. The shoulders, however, look less aggressive than on Tom Ford’s usual “Windsor” jackets and have a more natural look. The jacket length is a little on the short side.


The details are what throw off this dinner jacket. The most obvious error is a button two front, which already brings this dinner jacket down to the level of Timothy Dalton’s black dinner jacket in Licence to Kill. A single-breasted dinner jacket should only have one button, no exception. The second button disrupts the elegant lines that a dinner jacket should have. The single vent is another error on this dinner jacket. Most traditionally, a dinner jacket should not have any vents, though short double vents have been acceptable for half a century. The single vent is the sportiest of all vent styles and is completely out of place on a dinner jacket.

Silk facings—grosgrain silk on this dinner jacket—are also an untraditional detail. The lapels, jetted pocket and covered buttons (including the five on the sleeve) are all trimmed in grosgrain silk. Whilst black and midnight blue dinner jackets need silk facings to distinguish them from suit jackets, a ivory dinner jacket does not need this differentiation. Without silk facings, an ivory dinner jacket still looks nothing like a sports coat. On film, the silk facings aren’t very apparent, but the facings on this jacket look quite gaudy in person. Silk facings also mean that there will be two different silks in the outfit—white on the jacket versus black on the the trouser stripes and accessories. The black silk bow tie clashes against the white silk lapels.

All of the untraditional details—the second button on the front, the single vent and the silk facings—are marks of a cheap rental and are separate this dinner jacket from the five elegant dinner jackets Bond has previously worn. The construction—apparent in the shaping—and materials put into a Tom Ford jacket, however, ensure that it does not look cheap. This dinner jacket stands above Dalton’s from Licence to Kill based on its better fit and superior quality, but all others in the series—ivory, black or midnight blue—are done better.

Bond wears the ivory dinner jacket with black wool and mohair blend grain de poudre black tie trousers. Grain de poudre translates from French into English as “grain power”, and it has a fine diagonal grainy texture. Mohair gives the trousers a bit of sheen whilst making them slightly more comfortable in the Moroccan heat. The trousers have a flat front, medium-low rise, an extended waistband with a hook-and-eye closure, slide-buckle side adjusters and a black satin silk stripe down the outseam on either side. The lower rise of the trousers is masked by a black satin silk cummerbund from Tom Ford, which has only two large pleats. White moiré braces from Albert Thurston hold up the trousers, and these are the same braces Bond wears with his black Brioni dinner suit in Casino Royale and his midnight blue Tom Ford dinner suit in Skyfall.


The white cotton poplin dress shirt is also from Tom Ford, and its details recall many of the shirts Sean Connery and Roger Moore wore in their Bond films. It has Tom Ford’s “small collar”, which is a slightly short classic spread collar. The front is has a pleated front and is fastened with mother-of-pearl buttons. Spectre marks the first time since The Living Daylights that Bond has had visible mother-of-pearl buttons down the front placket of his dress shirt. The shirts in the films since have either shown studs down the front or covered the buttons with a fly front placket. The shirt also has double cuffs, gauntlet button, a split yoke and darts in the back.

Bond’s black diamond-pointed, butterfly-shaped bow tie should be in satin silk to match the satin cummerbund and satin stripes on the trousers. However, it does not have much sheen and is likely grosgrain to match the texture of the lapels. This is the third time Bond wears the often-neglected classic diamond bow tie, after Dr. No and Quantum of Solace.

Daniel Craig chose a red carnation to wear in the lapel on this dinner jacket to pay homage to Goldfinger, even though the dinner jacket only superficially resembles the dinner jacket Sean Connery wears in Goldfinger. The heavy filters in Spectre make the carnation looks much darker than it looks in reality.

Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones “Alex” model wholecut in black calf. The sleek and clean elegance of the plain wholecut is a modern alternative to patent plain-toe oxford or opera pump. Patent leather looks passé to some, whilst well-polished calf can have a more understated look. The “Alex” has five eyelet pairs and a chiselled toe. Bond wears the same shoes with his midnight blue dinner suit in Skyfall.

James Bond and Double Cuffs


Rounded double cuffs in Goldfinger

The double cuff, also known as the French cuff, is a type of shirt cuff that folds back on itself and fastens with cufflinks. The double cuff is the most formal type of cuff after the single-link cuff, which also fastens with cufflinks but only has a stiff single layer. For the double cuff to fold over neatly, it needs to have a light and soft interfacing, either fused or sewn. A heavy or stiff interfacing won’t fold over as nicely, and the reason for the cuff folding is to give the cuff stability without the stiffness of the single cuff. Double cuffs should always be fastened in the kissing position and never overlapping like a button cuff.

Double cuffs on a Tom Ford shirt in Quantum of Solace

Square double cuffs on a Tom Ford shirt in Quantum of Solace

The formality of the double cuff makes it the standard cuff on shirts for black tie, though cocktail cuffs are also appropriate with black tie. Double cuffs are a minimum requirement for morning dress, but single-link cuffs are a dressier option. Double cuffs are also appropriate with any suit for any occasion. They pair nicely with blazers and most sports coats as well. The formality of double cuffs, however, demands a tie. They should not be worn in a casual environment.

Double cuffs vary primarily in two ways: the corner style and the placement of the link-holes. Most double cuffs have a square corner. They may also have rounded corners or mitred (angle-cut) corners, and typically this describes the corner at the back edge of the cuff and not the folded edge. Rounded cuffs have the benefit of sliding through jacket cuffs more smoothly. Double cuffs may be styled in other ways, such as with a mitred corner at the fold or with a contoured back edge, but these are fussier and less traditional designs.

Rounded double cuffs in For Your Eyes Only

Rounded double cuffs on a Frank Foster shirt in For Your Eyes Only

Though double cuffs with square corners are technically the most formal, practically there is no difference. Any style of double cuff can be worn the same way. Bond has worn square, mitred and rounded double cuffs with black tie, and he has worn square and rounded double cuffs with his suits. The mitred cuffs on his dress shirts in Goldfinger have unusually large mitred corners.

Notice the large mitred corner on the double cuff

Notice the large mitred corner on the double cuff in Goldfinger

The placement of the link-holes has varied on Bond’s double cuffs. On Bond’s British shirts from Turnbull & Asser and Frank Foster, the link-holes are placed close to the fold, which shows off the cufflinks and gives the cuff both flare and flair. On Bond’s Sulka, Brioni and Tom Ford shirts, the link-holes are centred on the cuffs. This prevents the cuffs from flaring out, meaning they’re less likely to get stuck inside a jacket sleeve. This link-hole placement has the downside of hiding the cufflinks further inside the jacket sleeves.

From Dr. No through Licence to Kill, James Bond almost exclusively wears double cuffs with black tie and other formal wear. Goldfinger is the exception, where Bond also wears double cuffs with his suits and sports coats. Starting with GoldenEye, Bond almost always has worn double cuff shirts with his suits as well.

James Bond breaks the rules in Quantum of Solace when he wears a shirt with double cuffs with his shawl-collar cardigan, but the results are less than favourable. Not only do formal double cuffs clash with this casual ensemble, they bind under a snug knitted cuff.


A double cuff shirt from Tom Ford under a shawl-collar cardigan in Quantum of Solace

A Nylon-Front Blouson and Ski Trousers in Solden


For a snowy mountain adventure in Solden, Austria in Spectre, James Bond wears an elegant outfit of a nylon-front blouson, a mock turtleneck and vintage-inspired ski trousers. The zip-front blouson from Tom Ford is knitted with a fine rib in dark grey merino wool with elasticised cuffs and a mock turtleneck collar. The front of the blouson, however, is blue nylon with 12 large, down-filled ribs. There is a zipped slash pocket on either side of the front.

Under the blouson, Bond wears a mock turtleneck jumper from N.Peal in “Lapis Blue”. It is made from a fine gauge 70% cashmere and 30% silk blend. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. The warm, rich blue is flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion, and the bit of blue that shows from beneath the blouson’s collar brings the needed contrast to the dark shades of the rest of the outfit. The warm colour of the jumper is more like cerulean than a true lapis blue.


Costume designer Jany Temime spoke to Bloomberg Business about the black ski trousers, which Tom Ford calls the “Sky Pant”:

Those were based off French army ski trousers, 1960s ski trousers. I took them to Tom Ford, and he made them for us. It was very old fashioned the way he did it, with the same look.

Since they are based on 1960s trousers, the “Sky Pant” does not have the slim fit of all the other trousers than Bond wears in Spectre. They are tailored from a heavy brushed wool, woven in a pronounced steep twill. At the front there are double forward pleats. The pleats are stitched down roughly two inches at the top about half a centimetre into the pleat. It’s not uncommon for pleats to be stitched down for the first inch or two at the top to help them lay more neatly, but they’re ordinarily stitched down at the edge of the pleat. By stitching down the pleat away from the edge, the sharp edge of the pleat is continued up to the waistband for a less interrupted look whilst still benefitting from being stitched at the top.


On each side of the trousers forward of the side seams is an offset side pocket with rearward-facing flaps that fasten down with a button. There is a a jetted pocket on either side of the rear. The legs are tapered and have stirrups and expanding gussets at the bottom. The trousers have belt loops, but we don’t see if Bond wears a belt with them.

Though the trousers are designed for skiing, James Bond does not ski in Spectre. These may be very stylish, but there are better modern alternatives for actual skiing. If they get wet, the elegant crease down each leg would disappear!


Bond wears the trousers tucked into black Danner Mountain Light II 5″ boots. The boots lace with five pairs of lugs to the toe and two pairs of speed hooks at the top for a secure fit. The boots are made of one piece with leather plus a counter up the back. They have Vibram rubber soles with yellow cleats. Bond wears heavy grey socks folded over the top, meaning the trousers are worn inside the socks as well.

Bond’s sunglasses are from Vuarnet with black leather shields on the sides. The quilted black gloves are made by Agnelle.

The Differences Between the Skyfall and Spectre Tom Ford O’Connor Suits

The Tom Ford O'Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

The Tom Ford O’Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

Costume designer Jany Temime updated the style of the Tom Ford O’Connor suit for Spectre from her and Tom Ford’s original design made for Skyfall. The style changes are easy change to identify, and the biggest difference is the lapel roll. Both suits have three buttons, but whilst the lapel ends just below the top button on the Skyfall jackets, the lapels rolls to the middle button and completely over the top button on the Spectre suits. This is known as a three-roll-two. The lower foreparts—or quarters—of the Spectre jackets are more cutaway than on the Skyfall jackets, but this results in a triangle of shirt showing between the fastened jacket button and top of the trousers. This is not a problem with the jacket but rather a problem with the trousers’ low rise. The lapel roll and quarters on the Spectre suit jackets emphasise the silhouette’s dramatic shape better than the straighter button three front of the Skyfall suit jackets does.

The Spectre O’Connor jackets have four buttons on the cuffs instead of the three buttons that are on the cuffs of the Skyfall jackets. The other details of the jackets are the same: straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, gently slanted pockets and single vents.

The suit jackets in Spectre fit a little different from the suit jackets in Skyfall, but the jackets in both films share many of the same fit problems. The jackets are all fashionably short and have too much waist suppression. In comparison to the Skyfall jackets, the Spectre jackets have a fuller chest, wider shoulders and fuller sleeves. The tighter chest on the Skyfall jackets pulls open, and the narrower shoulders de-emphasise Daniel Craig’s herculean form. These fit comparisons are based on the fit of the jacket in comparison to Craig’s body.

The measurements of the jackets in both films may actually be the same, and because Daniel Craig is no longer so brawny, the jackets in Spectre may look fuller in the upper torso . His slimmer, but still fit, build in Spectre gives the suits an easier fit up top. Whilst the jackets in Skyfall look like they are a full size too small, the jackets in Spectre look like they are the right size (defined by the chest and shoulders) but just have too much waist suppression in the wrong places. Rather than the “shrunken” or “bursting out” look of Skyfall, the suit jackets in Spectre only look poorly shaped at the waist. It’s a slight improvement.

There’s nothing wrong with a closely fitted suit, but to be a well-fitting suit it needs to smoothly follow the contours of the body. Daniel Craig’s suits in both Skyfall and Spectre do not do a good job of following his figure. If the goal is to show off Craig’s physique, a suit that perfectly follows his body with smooth, clean lines will show it off better than a suit with a distorted shape and stressed creasing.

The suit trousers didn’t change much from Skyfall to Spectre. In both films they have a low rise, which seems even lower because the trousers tend to sag down. The trousers are made in the same style in both films, with a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. The trousers in Spectre were hemmed a bit shorter than they were in Skyfall.

Daniel Craig wears four Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre: a two-piece blue and black Prince of Wales check with a light blue windowpane, a two-piece grey herringbone with a track stripe, a two-piece blue sharkskin and a three-piece anthracite pin point damier check. All of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall were made in the O’Connor style.

Daniel Craig at the Spectre Premiere


Daniel Craig arrived at the Spectre premiere at Royal Albert Hall in London properly dressed in Bondian black tie. Craig’s black dinner suit is Tom Ford’s signature “Windsor” model. which is the same model as the ivory dinner jacket that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. Unlike the dinner jacket in Spectre, this black dinner jacket is properly cut for only one button on the front with a lower stance. The suit is likely made of a wool and mohair blend since it has a slight sheen, and many of Tom Ford’s dinner suits are made of an 85% wool and 15% mohair blend.

The dinner jacket is tailored with strong, straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It has a single button on the front, medium-wide peaked lapels, jetted pockets, five buttons on the cuffs and deep double vents. The sleeves are finished with turned back gauntlet cuffs, which wrap around only the outer half of the sleeves and are sewn into inner sleeve seam. The jacket’s peaked lapels, pocket jettings, gauntlet cuffs and buttons are faced in satin silk.


The cut of the double vents doesn’t work well for Craig’s large seat, which is likely why Craig has been dressed in all single vents in his last two films. It’s not because Craig’s build doesn’t work for double vents but rather because the way the vents on this jacket are cut doesn’t work for him. The vents on this dinner jacket don’t completely gape open, but they’re pulled open so that there’s almost no overlap. The vents need to be flared out more to have the proper overlap, and the double vents on the “Rengecy” cut in Quantum of Solace had the necessary flare.

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

The dinner suit’s trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side adjusters and straight legs with a satin stripe down each leg. The legs are narrow but not tight.

The white dress shirt has a short spread collar in marcella cotton, a marcella bib front with no placket and marcella double cuffs. The front of the shirt takes four studs, but Craig’s studs do not all match each other. The first stud looks like smoked mother of pearl with a black centre whilst the second and third studs are white mother of pearl with nothing in the centre. The fourth stud looks like it’s also white mother of pearl, but it has a larger rim. The double cuffs fasten with round double-sided cufflinks in mother of pearl.


The black thistle bow tie is not as shiny as the jacket’s facings and may be a barathea weave instead of matching the lapels in a satin weave. Craig wore a cummerbund that matches the bow tie. He had a puffed white silk handkerchief stuffed into his outer breast pocket. On his left lapel, Craig wore a Royal British Legion poppy pin with two red paper petals and a green paper leaf on his lapel, which commemorates those who were killed in war and supports those currently serving. The shoes are Crockett & Jones Alex black calf wholecuts, which Craig wears in Skyfall and Spectre with black tie.


Daniel Craig wasn’t the only person at the premiere dressed like James Bond. Host David Walliams was wearing the same ivory Tom Ford dinner jacket that Craig wears in Spectre. But whether or not you think Walliams looked good, he was poorly dressed because an ivory dinner jacket should never be worn in the British Isles, especially not in autumn or in London. It does not fit him particularly well, with a noticeable collar gap at times. Likewise, Sam Smith was also poorly dressed in his ivory dinner jacket, looking even worse because of his attached wing collar. Though the wing collar looked bad, it is also too formal to pair with an ivory dinner jacket.

Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes in Spectre

The latest “Basted for Bond” infographic looks at the Tom Ford suits and coats that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. This infographic details the differences between the updated roll two “O’Connor” suit jacket and the peak lapelled “Windsor” suit jacket. The single-breasted and double-breasted are included.


The Spectre Collection at Tom Ford


I visited the Tom Ford shop on Madison Avenue in New York City to see the Spectre clothing first-hand, and I was thoroughly impressed. They had in stock examples of every suit from the film plus a khaki left hand twill cotton two-piece suit that is not used in the film. Unlike the Skyfall suits sold by Tom Ford, all of the suits for the Spectre collection are screen-accurate. The shop also has the single-breasted and double-breasted overcoats, sky blue and purple blue shirts with “Dr. No” cocktail cuff, the white pin-collar cocktail cuff shirt, the nylon-front knitted blouson, the “Sky” wool ski pants with stirrup bottoms and forward pleats, a narrow grey repp tie, three different narrow blue repp ties and a wider black-on-black tie. It’s an impressive collection in both the quality of the clothes and the diversity of the items. Spectre features has the most diverse collection of suitings that Bond has worn since The World Is Not Enough, and Daniel Craig picked out the different cloths himself.

Most of the suits are in the Fit Y O’Connor model, which has narrow notched lapels, slanted pockets and an aggressively shaped cut. Whilst the regular O’Connor suit has two buttons, the Spectre O’Connor suits are completely unique within Tom Ford’s collection in that they have the Regency model’s three buttons with the lapels rolled to the second button. The lapel is more gently rolled on the suits than it looks on Daniel Craig, who wears his suits slightly too tight. If the jacket isn’t too tight, this will allow the lapel to have a very elegant roll.

The black herringbone suit and ivory dinner jacket are the Fit A Windsor model, but it’s not Tom Ford’s usual Windsor cut. Though it has the Windsor’s wide peaked lapels and dramatic roped sleeveheads, the body has the same aggressive cut that the O’Connor suits have. The only difference with the fit of the Windsor compared to the O’Connor is that the Windsor has a slightly wider shoulder.

Despite Daniel Craig’s suits looking just a little too snug on him, the fit of these ready-to-wear suits is the same fit that was developed especially for Daniel Craig. This explains how his suits in Skyfall with a size tag of “48F” could be bespoke and still have a size tag. He was the mould for this collection.

Both suit jacket styles have a very structured and shaped cut, much like what the military and equestrian Savile Row tailors make. The shoulders and chest have a lot of padding for a clean military look, but the jacket still feels natural because it is shaped to the body and doesn’t sit on top of the body. Like the traditional Savile Row suit, the cut is very waisted. It works well for slim and athletic men, though Tom Ford has other cuts that may work better for heavier men.

I tried on both the O’Connor and the Windsor models in a size 48 regular (European sizing), and they fit me perfectly. I am slim, but I do not have Daniel Craig’s athletic build and I am an inch shorter than he is. The fit on me was very close and hugged the body all over, but the jackets were shaped perfectly and did not pull at all. The jacket was also long enough to cover my buttocks. I didn’t feel like I was wearing a high fashion suit, just a suit of exceptional quality that fit me perfectly.

Though there are not a large variety of sizes available for each piece, I was told that most of the suits could be purchased made-to-measure.

Tom Ford suits are tailored and shaped more like Savile Row suits than they are like most ready-to-wear suits, even high-end ready-to-wear suits. Though Zegna’s factories produce Tom Ford suits, Tom Ford’s suits have nothing else in common with Zegna’s and should never be compared. A Tom Ford suit is in no way a marked-up Zegna suit. The cuts are unique to Tom Ford and the construction is different and made to a higher standard, the highest I’ve ever seen in any ready-to-wear suit and comparable to many bespoke suits.

Of the Spectre clothes, I noticed that both the blue Prince of Wales check suit and the blue sharkskin suit look lighter and more vivid in person than they do in the stills, posters and trailers. This lighter blue is not only very trendy, it is the perfect shade for Daniel Craig’s light and warm complexion and blue eyes. The black herringbone suit looks lighter than black double-breasted bridge coat even though they are both black, but the herringbone weave reflects light and prevents it from looking flat like ordinary black suits. The cotton poplin shirts are the softest I’ve ever felt, yet they still have body. The purple blue shirt that Daniel Craig wore in his interview with Jonathan Ross had plenty of sheen, but it didn’t have the same iridescent look in person, no matter which way I turned it.

Cocktail Cuffs on the Jonathan Ross Special


In the ITV special “James Bond’s Spectre with Jonathan Ross”, Daniel Craig dresses down for an interview in what may or may not be clothes that he wears in Spectre. Craig’ s shirt is from Tom Ford in purple blue cotton poplin. Though this shirt has not been seen in any stills or trailers from Spectre, it is part of Tom Ford’s collection of Spectre clothing. The shirting has an iridescent look, which may be the result of weaving blue in one direction and purple in the other direction. This iridescent look, however, almost makes the shirt look like it had a bleach accident. The collar is the same “classic” point collar that Craig’s double cuff shirts in Spectre have. The shirt has a narrow front placket and darts in the back for a slim fit.


Tom Ford calls the shirt’s cuffs “‘Dr. No’ cuffs” because they are based on the cocktail cuffs that Sean Connery first wears as James Bond in Dr. No, though Connery also wears the same cuffs in four other Bond films. The cuffs have two buttons and the same scalloped shape that Connery’s cuffs have, though the top button on Craig’s cuffs is more obscured than on Connery’s cuffs. Overall, the cuffs have the elegant, flowing design that cocktail cuffs should have. The cuffs are attached to the sleeve with pleats, and the sleeves have gauntlet buttons.

Daniel Craig dresses down the lower half of his body with dark indigo wash jeans and Nike training shoes. British GQ wrote about some of the clothes that Bond wears in Spectre, including a pair of selvedge jeans by Rag & Bone. These could be those Rag & Bone jeans. We have not yet seen Craig wearing these jeans in any footage or stills from the film, so these may just be part of his personal wardrobe. The jeans have a slim, straight leg, and Craig wears the bottoms of the jeans turned up. Craig’s Nike training shoes are the Air Max 90 SneakerBoot in “bamboo” tan suede with “newsprint” grey trim at the base, red trim at the top, white soles, blue laces and a black swoosh logo.