The Spectre Trailer: Tom Ford Suits and Coats

A longer Spectre trailer was released yesterday and revealed official footage of many of the suits and coats that James Bond wears in the film. Spectre has the most varied selection of tailored clothing of the Bond series we’ve seen since Roger Moore was Bond. The clothes it features are designed by both the film’s costume designer Jany Temime and by Tom Ford. Though there are still problems with the fit, the styles of the clothes respect the history of Bond’s exquisite wardrobes over the years. Here is an overview of the tailored clothes in the film.

Blue Prince of Wales Suit with a Blue Windowpane

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This lightweight wool suit is the Tom Ford O’Connor cut, with a few updates from the suits in Skyfall. The O’Connor suit jacket, which is designed by Jany Temime, has three buttons with the narrow lapels rolled to the middle button. It has a single vent, four cuff buttons and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. The jacket is cut with straight shoulders and roped sleeveheads. The trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side-adjusters, a waistband extension with a hook closure and a straight leg with turn-ups. The jacket fits tightly, but it’s not quite as tight as the suit jackets in Skyfall. The sleeves look less constricting. Unfortunately, it’s still too short and doesn’t fully-cover Daniel Craig’s buttocks. The trousers are again too tight and a little too short.

Bond wears his blue Prince of Wales check suit with a white shirt from Tom Ford. The shirt has a point collar and double cuffs. Bond’s tie is solid medium blue and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The shoes are black Crockett & Jones Norwich five-eyelet derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Grey Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Three-Quarter Coat

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This wool, silk and mohair suit is also made in Tom Ford’s O’Connor cut, detailed exactly the same as the blue Prince of Wales check suit. This suit is worn with two different shirts and ties. The first (below) is a white Tom Ford shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. The tie is solid medium grey and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The second shirt (above) is sky blue, made in the same style as the white shirt. With this shirt, Bond wears a solid navy tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears black Crockett & Jones Norwich derby shoes with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over this suit, Bond wears a navy cashmere and silk herringbone three-quarter topcoat with a three buttons hidden under a fly front, a moleskin collar, flapped pockets, a rear vent and three cuff buttons. This kind of coat is often known as the “Crombie” coat, named for the brand who made this style popular. It’s like a chesterfield but shorter.

Blue Sharkskin Suit

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Not much is seen of this wool sharkskin suit, but it appears to be the same style as the other O’Connor suits that we see more of. Bond wears it with a solid navy tie and a white shirt with a point collar. It has either double cuffs or cocktail cuffs. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

Black Herringbone Three-Piece Suit and Greatcoat

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The black herringbone wool three-piece suit is different than the other suits in Spectre, made in Tom Ford’s Windsor cut. The Windsor is one of Tom Ford’s most popular designs. The jacket buttons two and has medium-wide peaked lapels and pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with flaps, a ticket pocket, a single vent and five cuff buttons. The Windsor jacket is slightly longer than the O’Connor jacket. The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button and four welt pockets. The trousers are similar to the O’Connor suit’s trousers but have a slightly fuller leg and no turn-ups. With this suit Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford that has a pinned eyelet collar and single-button cocktail cuffs. The tie is black with a subtle texture. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over the suit, Bond wears a knee-length double-breasted greatcoat made in black brushed wool. It has eight buttons on the front with four to button, an ulster collar, slash pockets, a button-on half belt in the back, a rear vent and three cuff buttons.

Ivory Dinner Jacket

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The new Spectre trailer reveals James Bond’s first ivory dinner jacket since A View to a Kill, released 30 years ago. Not much can be seen of this ivory silk and viscose blend faille dinner jacket, but it is made in the Windsor style and has medium-wide peaked lapels. The wide peaked lapels make this dinner jacket most closely resemble Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever. Bond wears a black cummerbund, and most likely black trousers, under the dinner jacket. The white dress shirt is from Tom Ford with a spread collar, double cuffs and a pleated front. The black diamond-point bow tie that Bond previously wears in Dr. No and Quantum of Solace returns. Compared to the bow tie in Quantum of Solace, this bow tie is pointier. Bond also wears a red boutonnière in his lapel, paying homage to Goldfinger. The muted colours of the trailer make the flower look darker and duller than it likely is in reality.

The images here have been partially colour-corrected to look more true to the actual colours of the clothes. The trailer’s colours are often muted and have a very warm cast. After Spectre is released, this blog with have more thorough reviews of all the clothing in the film.

More Spectre Filming in London

Spectre London Tom Ford Suit

Spectre has been filming in London as of late, and James Bond is appropriately dressed for the city in a grey pinstripe suit and “Crombie” coat. There are many photos at Daily Mail. The Tom Ford suit is a combination of styles from Quantum of Solace and Skyfall, but it’s also something new. The suit is dark grey with narrow-spaced white pinstripes, which makes the suit look medium grey overall.

The suit jacket goes back to the Quantum of Solace buttoning arrangement of three buttons with the lapels rolled to the middle button. The lapels are narrow, but not overly so. The shoulders are straight with a little padding, the chest is clean and the waist is very suppressed, with only a little pulling at the button. The fit is much cleaner than the fit in Skyfall. The jacket has a single vent and slightly slanted pockets. All of each cuff’s four buttons are fastened, something unusual—but an improvement—for Craig’s Bond’s who usually leaves the last button open on his Tom Ford suits. The last buttonhole is longer than the rest, as usual for Tom Ford’s suits.

The biggest problem with the suit jacket is its length. Like the suit jackets in Skyfall, it’s about an inch too short—or perhaps two inches too short if you want a traditional English length. The too-short jacket emphasises his hips more and takes away from his masculine physique. In addition to being fashionable, the shorter length may be done to make Craig look taller. Overall, the fit is a huge improvement over the suits in Skyfall, and costumer designer Jany Temime has corrected some of the mistakes she made in her first Bond film.

The trousers have a flat front with side adjusters and turn-ups. Turn-ups with flat front trousers has a long tradition in America, and now with Bond since he has been wearing non-pleated suit trousers with turn-ups since The World Is Not Enough. The legs are narrow, but they have enough room to allow Bond to move around without constraint. The rise looks extremely low, but the trousers also appear to be sagging. Even with the sagging, the rise is still lower than it should be to ensure that no shirt and tie show beneath the jacket’s fastened button. They don’t look particularly comfortable around the fork.

The white shirt has a point collar—which is rather un-British—and double cuffs. The tie is grey and may be solid or have a discreet pattern. The tie is tied in a four-in-hand knot with a well-formed dimple. Bond’s shoes are are black five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes on a chiselled last with Dainite studded rubber soles, and most likely the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. Bond also wears Tom Ford sunglasses in some photos.

Spectre London Tom Ford Crombie Coat

The navy “Crombie coat” is made by Tom Ford in Crombie’s famous style. The “Crombie coat” is essentially a three-quarter length chesterfield, and most classically in navy. Crombie has long been so well known for making this type of topcoat that the style is universally known by the brand name. Tom Ford only sets this coat apart from Crombie’s models with his curved “barchetta” breast pocket.

The topcoat is fitted with straight shoulders, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The front is darted. In following the classic Crombie style, Bond’s Tom Ford topcoat has a navy velvet collar, a fly front with three large hidden buttons, straight pockets with flaps, a single vent and three buttons on the cuffs. Bond only fastens the middle button, which detracts from the elegance of the fly front because the top and bottom buttons are visible. And if the purpose of wearing a topcoat is to stay warm, why only fasten one button? It looks too tight to have the top button fastened anyway, which makes this a poorly fitted coat. The sleeves are also too short. The sleeves on an outercoat should be long enough to cover the shirt sleeves but not get in the way of the hands. Sleeves should be longer for the most warmth. The navy three-quarter coat with a velvet collar recalls Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield in Live and Let Die. It’s just one of a few elements of Bond’s wardrobe in Spectre that has similarities to the clothes in Live and Let Die.

Comparing Daniel Craig’s Navy Pinstripe Suits

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The three-piece suit in Casino Royale

Quantum of Solace begins moments after Casino Royale ends with James Bond wearing a two-piece navy pinstripe suit. Bond is supposed to be wearing the same three-piece suit from at the end of Casino Royale, but the change from a three-piece suit to a two-piece suit is not because we’re meant to think that James Bond removed his waistcoat. Naturally if a man wants to shed a layer of his three-piece suit, he’s going to take off his suit jacket and not the waistcoat. The reason why James Bond is no longer wearing a waistcoat in Quantum of Solace is because a change in costume designer meant a reinterpretation of the Casino Royale outfit. These two suits are the only two in the series that can be fairly judged by comparison since story-wise they are supposed to be the same suit.

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The two-piece suit in Quantum of Solace

For the final scene of Casino Royale, costume designer Lindy Hemming dressed James Bond in a three-piece Brioni suit to signify that Daniel Craig’s new Bond had become the more sophisticated James Bond we knew from previous Bond films who takes pride in dressing up. This was a large step from being a man who didn’t have a proper dinner jacket earlier in the film. Lousie Frogley assumed the costume designer position for Quantum of Solace and abandoned Brioni for Tom Ford. Perhaps she decided to put Bond in a two-piece suit rather than a three-piece suit because he hadn’t matured into the classic Bond character yet, because a three-piece suit didn’t fit the Lake Garda setting or because a two-piece suit worked more effectively for the intense action stunts. A three-piece suit also would not have looked so great if Frogley was intent on Bond removing his tie. She at least kept the suit a navy pinstripe to maintain a modicum of continuity between the films. But even though the suits are both navy with pinstripes, the stripes are grey track stripes in Casino Royale whilst the stripes are light blue pinstripes in Quantum of Solace. The stripes on both suits are spaced no more than a half-inch apart.

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The three-piece suit in Casino Royale

The cuts of the Brioni and Tom Ford suits are very different. The Brioni suit jacket has straight shoulders with a healthy amount of shoulder padding whereas the Tom Ford suit jacket has much softer pagoda shoulders, which have a slight concave shape. Both suits have roped sleeveheads. The Tom Ford jacket has a more shaped silhouette than the Brioni jacket has, with a more defined waist. Though both suit jackets fit closely, the Brioni has a boxier silhouette. Wearing the suit jacket open adds to the boxy look. Both suit jackets have three buttons with the middle button placed at the middle of body’s waist. The Brioni jacket’s lapels roll gently at the top button, whilst the Tom Ford jacket’s lapels have a harder roll down to the middle button for a button two silhouette. The Brioni sleeves are cut full at the upper arm and taper down to the cuffs. By contrast, the Tom Ford sleeves are narrower through the upper arm and have a slight flare at the end for a dash of English style. Both suit jackets’ sleeves are slightly too long, but it is hardly noticeable in Quantum of Solace since Bond’s arms are hardly ever at his side. The Tom Ford suit also has a little skirt flare, which is lacking in the Brioni suit’s more Italian cut.

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The two-piece suit in Quantum of Solace

The two suit jackets’ details vary too. Both jackets have straight pockets with flaps, but the Tom Ford jacket adds a ticket pocket. Whilst the Brioni suit jacket has a typical angled breast pocket, the Tom Ford jacket has a curved “barchetta” breast pocket, which is a Neapolitan-inspired detail. The Brioni jacket has four buttons on the cuff whilst the Tom Ford jacket has five buttons on the cuffs, worn with the last button open. The Tom Ford suit has double vents, but the vent style on the Brioni suit is difficult to tell. It may also have double vents, but considering that Bond’s other worsted suits in Casino Royale have single vents it could be a likely possibility here too.

The suit trousers between the Brioni and Tom Ford suits have different cuts. Both trousers have straight legs with little tapering, but the Brioni trousers have much wider legs. The Tom Ford trousers have a flat front whilst the Brioni trousers have a small dart on either side of the front placed beside the side pockets. The side pockets on the Brioni suit trousers are slightly slanted off-seam, but the pockets on the Tom Ford trousers are on the seam, which curves forward at the top. The Brioni trousers are worn with a belt and the Tom Ford trousers have slide-buckle side-adjusters placed on the waistband seam. Both suits’ trousers have turn-ups.

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The two-piece suit in Quantum of Solace

The part of the outfit that is the least changed between Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace is the shirt: both are light blue cotton poplin. The Casino Royale shirt is made by Brioni and the Quantum of Solace shirt is made by Tom Ford. The shirt in Quantum of Solace, however, is a paler blue than the shirt in Casino Royale. Both have moderate spread collars, front plackets and double cuffs, though the collar in Casino Royale sits a little higher and closer to the face.

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The two-piece suit in Quantum of Solace

The ties are both blue neat patterns, but they have different patterns and colours. The Casino Royale tie (maker unknown) is a honeycomb pattern in blue and white, and the Quantum of Solace tie (made by Tom Ford) is roughly a pattern of blue and black squares. In Casino Royale Bond ties the tie with a four-in-hand knot whilst in Quantum of Solace he ties it with a windsor knot. The tie in Casino Royale has a very heavy interlining, which makes the knot quite large. Though Bond wears a folded white pocket handkerchief with his other suits in Quantum of Solace, he foregoes the handkerchief with this outfit so it more closely matches the Casino Royale outfit.

Bond, of course, wears black shoes with both suits, but the styles and makers, again, are different. In Casino Royale he wears the John Lobb Luffield, which is a two-eyelet derby. In Quantum of Solace he switches to the Church’s Philip perforated cap-toe oxford. This is one of the least noticeable differences between the two outfits since the shoes are hardly seen.

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The John Lobb Luffield two-eyelet derby in Casino Royale

Through comparing the suits in Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace, I have described some of the essential differences between Brioni’s and Tom Ford’s silhouettes and styles, though both makers offer a numbers different styles.

Do you prefer the three-piece suit in Casino Royale or the two-piece Tom Ford suit in Quantum of Solace?

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To save you the trouble of asking, yes, I will be posting a comparison of Mr. White’s two similar outfits from these same scenes.

Another Suit from Spectre Revealed

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Daily Mail has once again posted images from the filming of Spectre. This time Daniel Craig is wearing a light navy Tom Ford suit with a light windowpane over a glen check. The style and fit of the suit is, quite unfortunately, practically identical to the suits in Skyfall. Clearly it’s not a suit meant for moving around in!

The suit jacket looks like it has two buttons, but it may have three like in Skyfall. It also has straight shoulders, narrow notched lapels, a single vent, four buttons on the cuffs—with the last button left open—and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. As for the fit, the jacket length is again too short to cover his buttocks and it is too small all around. A suit should not be so binding, no matter how much one moves around. No matter how tight a suit is it doesn’t show off Daniel Craig’s muscular physique. Tight knitted garments, like the mock polo neck jumper, conform to the body and move with the body because they can stretch, whilst tight woven garments, especially tailored garments with a lot of internal structure, are unable to stretch. Suits can mould to the body, but they still have to fit well first, and they need a little allowance in areas for movement. The suit may be too tight because Daniel Craig is wearing a safety harness under it, but the costume designer Jany Temime should have accounted for that, just as she ordered a suit with longer sleeves for riding a motorbike in Skyfall. One things this suit from Spectre improves on over the Skyfall suits are wider shoulders, so at least Daniel Craig looks more powerful in this suit. The flat-front suit trousers are again a little too tight, and they aren’t staying up as high as they are supposed to sit on the waist. When the trousers sag, it causes the front to look messy and show below the fastened jacket button. The trousers have an extended waistband with side adjusters, and the legs are finished with turn-ups.

The white shirt is certainly an improvement over the Skyfall shirts since the tab collar is replaced with a point collar. Still, one would expect at least a semi-spread for such an English hero. The shirt also has double cuffs, which don’t quite fit inside the suit jacket’s narrow sleeves. One area that this shirt is not improved over the Skyfall shirts is the colour. Light blue flatters Daniel Craig’s light complexion more than white does, which washes him out a little. The tie is navy (possibly with a pattern that can’t be seen), and the navy tie with a navy suit is one of the most classic Bond combinations, though it is most often done with a blue shirt. It is tied in a four-in-hand knot. Since the knot is so narrow, the tie likely has a very light interlining. Craig also wears a folded white linen handkerchief in his breast pocket. The shoes are probably the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles. His socks are a rather boring and unstylish black. Navy would have been a better choice, since it would extend the line of possibly-too-short trouser legs.

See more photos and read about the filming at Daily Mail.

Spectre Teaser Poster: A Charcoal Mock Polo Neck

Spectre Teaser Poster

The teaser poster for Spectre was released yesterday, and it features Daniel Craig wearing a charcoal grey mock polo neck—also known as the mock turtleneck or mock roll-neck—jumper and charcoal grey checked trousers. The outfit with the visible shoulder holster immediately recalls Roger Moore’s black polo neck outfit in Live and Let Die. That outfit, in turn, was inspired by Steve McQueen’s very similar outfit in Bullitt, which was made five years before Live and Let Die. Whilst Moore’s and McQueen’s jumpers have true polo necks that are folded over, Daniel Craig’s jumper has a mock polo neck that has both ends of the collar sewn down to the neckline. It’s also shorter than a true polo neck. Daniel Craig’s jumper is also charcoal instead of black like Moore’s is, which is a more flattering choice to his light complexion. The finely-knitted wool jumper snugly hugs Daniel Craig’s body, and it has fine-ribbed cuffs and hem. It is 70% cashmere and 30% silk, and it is made by N.Peal.

The choice to bring back the polo neck may be due to Spectre director Sam Mendes’ fond memories of seeing his first James Bond film Live and Let Die. It may also be due to the popularity of the animated spy television show Archer, in which the title character popularised the black polo neck he originally saw tactical potential in and calls it the “tactleneck”. By going with charcoal grey instead of black, James Bond makes this mock polo neck his own. Grey is actually a little better for hiding in the dark than true black is. The grey mock polo neck recalls the lighter grey one that Sean Connery wears in You Only Live Twice.

The trousers are black with a tiny white or light grey tick pattern, giving them a charcoal look overall. The ends of the frogmouth pockets can be seen peaking out from under the jumper. The Tom Ford Autumn/Winter 2015 collection features many trousers with frogmouth pockets, so these could certainly be from it.

Pierce Brosnan for Kia in a Navy Peaked Lapel Suit

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Pierce Brosnan appeared in a Superbowl television advertisement for Kia Motors’ Sorrento Crossover SUV this year wearing a navy suit very similar to what we recently saw Daniel Craig wear for filming Spectre. Though Pierce Brosnan’s suit is a two-piece suit as opposed to a three-piece suit, it is made in a very similar button-two single-breasted, peaked-lapel cut that would suggest Tom Ford. The navy cloth has a sheen that would suggest mohair, possibly woven with yarns in white or other colours to give it extra sheen. The jacket has fairly wide lapels with a considerable amount of belly, and they extend roughly two-thirds of the way between the jacket’s opening and the sleeves. The shoulders are straight and have roped sleeveheads. The sleeves have five buttons on the cuffs. The suit trousers have a flat front and plain hems, and they are worn without a belt. This Kia advertisement plays up Brosnan’s James Bond past, and he is undoubtedly still supposed to dress like James Bond in this advertisement.

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This suit very closely resembles the navy three-piece Tom Ford suit that Pierce Brosnan wore to the premiere of The November Man. The most noticeable difference between these two suits are the cuff buttons. Though both suits have five buttons on the cuffs, they are overlapping in the suit in the Kia advertisement whilst they are touching on the suit the Brosnan wore to the premiere of The November Man. Also, the buttonhole closest to the edge on this suit is the same length as the others whilst it is longer on the suit at the premiere, just like on all of Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford suits. This could still be a Tom Ford suit, but the sleeves would not likely have been finished in house. If this is not a Tom Ford suit, it was certainly inspired by Tom Ford’s designs.

The white shirt has a point collar that stands up neatly inside the jacket’s collar. The collar stands fairly tall, which is flattering because it covers most of Pierce Brosnan’s sagging 61-year-old neck. Brosnan wears the collar open without a tie. Usually a dark suit looks incomplete without a tie, but Brosnan pulls off this look elegantly. The relaxed setting and Brosnan’s relaxed demeanour makes it work. The shirt also has a front placket and double cuffs. Brosnan’s shoes are burgundy cap-toe oxfords and his socks are grey, a neutral tone that neither complements his outfit nor clashes with it. Navy socks that match the suit, however, would have been a better neutral choice.

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If you haven’t seen the advertisement, you can watch it on YouTube.

A First Look at Spectre’s Suits

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Daily Mail has given us a good look at what Daniel Craig is wearing in Spectre. For those who want to read about the suit without spoilers, my write-up of this new suit is free of context. There are many more photos posted at imgur (where the photo above is from), but no more photos will follow in this article.

Daniel Craig’s first suit from Spectre that we get to see is a three-piece black herringbone made by Tom Ford. This black has a blue cast, so unlike ordinary blacks it doesn’t look brown or green. It’s likely a mohair blend due to the suit’s strong sheen. It’s made in Ford’s well-known style: a button two jacket with wide peaked lapels and strong pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The shoulders are similar to the Quantum of Solace suits’ shoulders. The dramatic silhouette is inspired by British designer/Savile Row tailor Tommy Nutter’s designs that his former tailors Edward SextonRoy Chittleborough and Joe Morgan still make today. I recommend checking out their work at the links above. Though Spectre is the third Bond film to feature Tom Ford’s suits, this is the first time Bond is wearing Ford’s signature style full-on. Craig’s suit jacket is still too tight and too short like the Skyfall suits, but it’s not as short and not quite as tight. Also, the jacket’s larger shoulders combined with a not-as-short length make Craig’s Bond look like the commanding man he should be. This is where Spectre‘s suits have greatly succeeded over Skyfall‘s. The narrow shoulders and shrunken cut of the Skyfall suits manage to make the muscular Daniel Craig look rather wimpy. The Skyfall suits look like they are a full chest size and length too small whereas this suit from Spectre looks only just a little too tight.

The suit jacket has wide pocket flaps with a ticket pocket, a single vent and five-button cuffs with the last button left open. The jacket’s lapels—being both very wide and peaked—make this suit rather flashy for a secret agent. Peaked lapels on a single-breasted jacket were popular in the 1930s and 40s and are popular again now, but they are not a conservative choice. James Bond previously wears peaked lapels on single-breasted suit jackets in Diamonds Are Forever and Casino Royale. The single vent—like in Skyfall—isn’t particularly British for a dressy worsted suit, but there’s technically nothing wrong with it. Sean Connery’s Bond wears single-vented suits fairly often. This is the style of suit jacket Tom Ford favours on himself, so he may have had more personal input this time around. Roger Moore even wears a suit in a very similar style in his film Street People.

The suit’s waistcoat has six buttons with the bottom button left open. Like the jacket, it looks a little too tight, but Craig doesn’t look like he is going to burst the buttons off it like the Hulk. The trousers have a flat front, somewhat low rise, slide-buckle side adjusters, narrow tapered legs—which are, again, just a little too snug—and plain hems. Yes, that’s right, Bond does not wear turn-ups (cuffs) this time. Only once or twice over the past twenty years has Bond worn suit trousers without turn-ups. The trousers have slipped down, revealing the shirt below the waistcoat. Braces would have helped the shirt to not show, and since Bond is wearing a waistcoat they would be completely hidden.

Daniel Craig not only wears Tom Ford’s preferred suit style but also Ford’s preferred shirt collar. Craig’s white shirt has a point collar with eyelets for a collar pin to stick through it. The silver collar pin is the kind with balls on the end that unscrew to slide through the holes in the collar. It’s the cleanest-looking type of collar pin, but it’s the most affected kind of collar pin as well. Ford himself prefers a collar without eyelets and a gold safety pin that sticks through the collar. Nevertheless, any collar pin is too fussy for the literary Bond’s simple tastes, and it’s a step beyond Skyfall’s tab collars. Pierce Brosnan was a big fan of the collar pin in Remington Steele since it was a popular style in the 1980s. One thing this shirt might actually get right is the cuff style. Click on the image at the top to enlarge and you might see a cocktail cuff! James Bond has not worn cocktail cuffs since Moonraker (not counting Never Say Never Again), but unless my eyes are deceiving me, it looks like he is wearing cocktail cuffs again. A win for the cocktail cuff fans! Costume designer Jany Temime deserves credit for this brilliant homage to the early Bond films. For those who aren’t fans of the cocktail cuffs they add yet another level of flashiness to the outfit.

Craig’s tie is a black-on-black pattern and tied in a windsor knot, another uncharacteristic style for Bond, but it certainly wouldn’t be Bond’s first windsor knot. The white pocket square with a black border is stuffed in the pocket, though it’s not stuffed in deep enough. It looks like he’s trying to hard to show it off, whereas just a little of it showing from behind the wide peaked lapels would have been more effective.

The black double-monk ankle boots are the Crockett & Jones Camberley. They have a cap toe and Dainite studded rubber sole. Monk boots are not to be confused with Jodhpur boots; monk boots have the quarters over the vamp whilst jodhpur boots have the vamp over the quaters. Though atypical, the boots are actually very Bond-like, recalling a mix of Sean Connery’s and Pierce Brosnan’s Bonds’ footwear. Connery wears black ankle boots with some of his suits in Goldfinger and Thunderball. Pierce Brosnan wears black monk shoes with some of his suits in The World Is Not Enough. The closest shoes to these previously worn by Bond are Sean Connery’s brown monk boots in Diamonds Are Forever that he wears with his light grey suitcream suit and brown checked sports coat. Boots work well with the narrow suit trousers since narrow trousers cover less and are more likely to show sock with regular shoes. Monk boots also respect the literary Bond, who “abhorred shoe-laces,” as Ian Fleming wrote in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. On the other hand, these monk boots are amongst Bond’s flashiest footwear. They might be even flashier than Roger Moore’s Gucci and Ferragamo horse-bit slip-ons!

Over the suit Daniel Craig wears a black greatcoat-inspired topcoat that has many similarities to the greatcoat he wears in Quantum of Solace. It is probably made by Tom Ford. The double-breasted coat is knee-length and has eight buttons on the front with four to button. The coat also has an ulster collar, meaning the coat has revers than can fold over button up at the neck. The ulster collar is more practical but less dressy than peaked lapels. The back of the coat has a half belt with buttons. The style of coat recalls James Bond’s military origins. Craig only buttons the coat’s second button from the top, which causes the rather lightweight topcoat to fall out of shape and rumple a bit. On top of that, the coat is a little too tight around the waist. It’s difficult to tell if the fit, the belt’s setting or the way Craig buttons the coat is the main cause of the rumpling. Both with and without the topcoat, Craig wears black perforated leather gloves that have a strap on top of the wrist. They go well with the black topcoat, but without the topcoat they look villainous. Craig wears sunglasses again in Spectre, and they’re probably made by Tom Ford.

Overall this first clear look of the style in Spectre is very interesting, and costume designer Jany Temime has done a better job with this suit in her second Bond film than she did with any of the suits in Skyfall. Though we see a fit problem again, it’s not as bad as it was in Skyfall. The clothing styles respect James Bond tradition in some areas—like the colours of the clothes, the cocktail cuffs, the boots (in some ways) and the topcoat—and ignore it in others—like the peaked lapels, the boots (in other ways) and the collar pin. The clothes are certainly too flashy for Bond, but at the same time they are very stylish and interesting.

Shirt Collar Width, Height and Point Length—and Poll!

Turnbull & Asser Spread

Sean Connery wearing a spread collar in From Russia with Love

The shirt’s collar is one of the most important parts of a man’s outfit because it frames the face. Whilst fit ranks paramount for all parts of a man’s outfit, the collar’s shape and proportions rank equal to its fit. The width of the spread between the collar points is often mentioned, but collar height and point length are equally important. The three most basic collar styles are the spread collar, the semi-spread collar and the point collar. A wider collar is slightly dressier than a narrow collar, but James Bond has worn collars of all widths for different purposes throughout the series.

Collars

The Spread Collar

The spread collar is the wide, classic English collar. It may also be known as an English spread collar or a semi-cutaway collar. The English may call this a classic collar since it’s the standard collar for shirtmakers there. A wider collar such as the spread collar best flatters and balances people who have an angular jaw like Sean Connery, Roger Moore and Daniel Craig. On the other hand, the wide spread collar emphasises a wide face and should be avoided by people with a very round face or square jaw.

Sean Connery wears a spread collar, usually made by Turnbull & Asser, in all of his James Bond films except Dr. No (which is discussed below), and the collar flatters his angular jaw. George Lazenby wears a spread collar on his Frank Foster shirt for the wedding outfit due to the more formal nature of the black lounge coat, and it returns to the series in Roger Moore’s on his Frank Foster shirts in his three Bond films in the 1980s: For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy and A View to a Kill. Pierce Brosnan brings them back again on his Turnbull & Asser shirts in Tomorrow Never Dies and The World Is Not Enough. The spread collar is Bond’s favourite collar to wear with black tie, even when he wears other collars with his regular suits.

George Lazenby wears a point collar in On Her Majesty's Secret Service

George Lazenby wears a point collar in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

The Point Collar

The point collar has the narrowest spread of the three basic collar. It is sometimes also called a forward point collar or a straight collar. Americans may call this a classic collar. The button-down collar is usually a variation on the point collar with a softer or no interfacing and buttons that hold down the collar points. The point collar best flatters men with a round face or square jaw, whilst it would extended a long face or an angular jaw.

Bond has worn very few point collars in the series. Many of George Lazenby’s Frank Foster shirts in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service have point collars, but a large amount of tie space prevents the collars from looking too narrow. It isn’t the ideal collar for Lazenby, but it doesn’t look bad on him either. Roger Moore’s Frank Foster shirts in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker also have point collars, and even without the oversized they collars are too narrow for Moore’s angular jaw.

Daniel Craig wearing a semi-spread collar in Quantum of Solace

Daniel Craig wearing a semi-spread collar in Quantum of Solace

The Semi-Spread Collar

The collar that almost any man can look good in is the semi-spread collar. It is a moderate spread collar that is narrower than classic spread collar but wider than a point collar. Some call this the Kent collar, after Prince George, Duke of Kent. Some in England also call this the classic collar, proving that there is no consensus on that term. When the collar spread is around a 45º angle is can be described as neither narrow nor wide, which makes the semi-spread collar a rather neutral collar. It’s the safest collar for any situation and won’t offend conservative dressers on either side of the pond.

The semi-spread collar is the collar James Bond wears most often throughout the series. However, it works best for people with an oval face like George Lazenby, Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan. George Lazenby wears semi-spread collars on some of his Frank Foster shirts in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, Roger Moore wears them on his Frank Foster shirts in Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, Timothy Dalton wears them on his shirts in The Living Daylights, Pierce Brosnan wears them on his Sulka shirts in GoldenEye and Daniel Craig wears them on his Brioni shirts in Casino Royale and his Tom Ford shirts in Quantum of Solace.

Collar-Height

Height and Point Length

The height of the collar and the length of the collar points should always be considered, especially since there is a considerable variety available. Today, collars with a short height and shorts points are trendy because they complement the narrow lapels that are also popular. However, most men are not flattered by such skimpy collars. A short collar with short points flatters a man with a short neck and an overall smaller head. On most men, however, a short collar will make their neck look awkwardly long and their head look too large in proportion to the rest of their body. Timothy Dalton’s undersized spread collars in Licence to Kill are not a good choice for him. Whilst his neck looks fine with a short collar height—a slightly taller collar would still be better—his head looks large against the short collar points. Apart from in Licence to Kill, Bond has avoided wearing short collars.

Octopussy Grey Rope Stripe

Roger Moore wearing a tall spread collar with long points in Octopussy

On the other hand, a collar that is too tall with points too long will overwhelm the face. A short neck will disappear under a tall collar, and a long points shrink the head. Roger Moore is known for wearing tall collars with long points, especially in his films from The Spy Who Loved Me and later. These large collars work for Roger Moore, and not just in the context of his wide lapels. His neck is long and his head is fairly large. In Live and Let Die, Moore wears a spread collar that is so tall it fastens with two stacked buttons. Few men have such a long neck that they truly need a two-button collar, but the second button provides a necessary rigidity so it can withstand the pressure from a tie. Daniel Craig’s tall Brioni collars in Casino Royale shorten his neck, though the point length is a good medium. The long Tom Ford collar points in Quantum of Solace make Craig’s head look a little small.

Extreme-Collars

Extreme Collars: Cutaway, Narrow Point and Beyond

The extreme collars, such as the cutaway collar and narrow point collar, are for those who want to make fashion statements. The spread collar is sometimes called a cutaway collar, but the cutaway collar term is ordinarily reserved for the especially wide examples. Some may call the wide cutaway collar a Windsor collar. Like the spread collar, the cutaway can only look good on someone with a very angular face. But even the most angular faces will still look best in a regular spread collar. Rather than widen a narrow, angular jaw, the contrast from a cutaway collar may start to emphasise it. Likewise, the roundest faces will not be flattered more by a very narrow point collar than by a classic point collar. A very narrow collar cannot balance the weight of a large head and will end up looking like a balloon on a string.

Sean-Connery-Dr-No-Cutaway-Collar

Sean Connery wearing a cutaway collar in Dr. No

These extreme collars have only been worn occasionally in the Bond films. Sean Connery wears cutaway collars on his Turnbull & Asser shirts throughout Dr. No, Roger Moore wears a cutaway collar on his Frank Foster shirt with morning dress in A View to a Kill and Pierce Brosnan wears Brioni shirts with cutaway collars in Die Another Day. Pierce Brosnan’s collars get wider with every Bond film he does, though the cutaway collar is certainly too wide for his oval face. The extreme cutaway collars that are trendy today are more severe than James Bond’s examples, whilst Bond’s cutaway collars are more like the collar originally made popular by the Duke of Windsor.

The tab collar that Daniel Craig wears on his Tom Ford shirts in Skyfall is like a variation on the narrow point collar. A narrow point collar would not flatter Daniel Craig’s angular face, but the his tab collar is a little different. The curve around the tie softens Craig’s angular jawline, and the collar points flare out below the tab to give the collar some needed breadth. If the collar just went straight down without the curves and flare it would not be the least bit flattering to Daniel Craig’s face. Still, a spread collar is a better choice for Daniel Craig’s angular jaw.

Daniel Craig wearing a tab collar in Skyfall

Daniel Craig wearing a tab collar in Skyfall

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