How James Bond Wears a Suit for Evenings Out


A midnight blue suit at a cocktail party in Quantum of Solace

Though James Bond is known for wearing black tie in the evening, most people don’t regularly attend such formal events. Bond sometimes goes out for less formal occasions at night, but what does he wear when he still needs to look his best? He wears a suit, naturally. When wearing a suit socially, such as for a cocktail party, an evening at a night club or a special dinner, one must look like they are dressed for pleasure and not for business. Stripes are usually a bad choice for this reason. Checks are great for social occasions, but they aren’t usually dressy enough for the evening unless the check is very subtle. Bond never wears a three-piece suit for evenings out, though in the right cloth a three-piece suit can be a great choice.


Bond having dinner in a lustrous charcoal suit in The Man with the Golden Gun

The cloth is what separates a social suit from a business suit. The cut of a suit or how many buttons it has doesn’t matter as much as the cloth. Darks suits, especially in blue, work best. The richer colour looks best under artificial light at night. Greys and browns are duller and don’t look as good at night, but in darker shades they can work well in the evening. Though worsteds are perfectly fine, luxurious cloths with a sheen, like mohair and silk, can also help differentiate a social suit from a business suit. Flannel can be a good choice for a casual evening out, like with the charcoal flannel suit Bond wears to dinner at the Roma camp in From Russia with Love.

Marine Blue Suit

A marine blue suit at a nightclub in The Man with the Golden Gun

The marine blue suit that Bond wears in The Man with the Golden Gun when at a nightclub in Beirut has a sheen that suggests mohair, making it perfect for both warm weather and for the club. Also in The Man with the Golden Gun, Bond wears a charcoal mini-herringbone suit that has a lustrous sheen for a dinner with Goodnight. Charcoal doesn’t isn’t as dressy as blue is in the evening, but with a sheen it’s an appropriate choice.

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

Though pinstripes aren’t the best choice for the evening, sometimes they work. When meeting Vesper for drinks on the train in Casino Royale, Bond wears a very dark navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes. Because these stripes are hardly noticeable, they don’t give the suit a business-like impression. However, his drinks are in a business setting with a bank liaison, making the pinstripes quite appropriate.

In Quantum of Solace (pictured top), Bond wears the easiest choice for a cocktail party: a midnight blue suit. Though black suits can work well for such an occasion, a midnight blue suit is infinitely more sophisticated. Being mohair tonic separates this suit even further from business suits, and the sheen raises the suit’s formality.


Bond dressed in a shiny grey pick-and-pick suit for the Junkanoo in Thunderball

In warm weather, both dark and light suits can work for the evening. In Dr. No, Bond wears a light grey mohair suit at Puss Feller’s nightclub in Jamaica, though Bond donned the suit earlier in the day. The sheen makes it look great at night. In Thunderball, Bond wears a light grey pick-and-pick mohair suit that also works perfectly for a hot evening out at the Junkanoo in the Bahamas. When Bond dresses up for the evening in warm locations and doesn’t wear a suit, he chooses a navy blazer. The navy blazer is the dressiest of sports coats and has many similarities to navy suit jackets. In the context of this article, the dark colour makes the navy blazer look good at night. Bond wears a navy blazer for his date with Miss Taro in Dr. No and at the Junkanoo in Thunderball.

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro in Dr, No

When accessorising, simplicity and contrast are key for these outfits. The elements are usually a dark suit, a light shirt and a solid or subtly patterned tie. The best shirt for the evening is solid white, like what Bond wears to the cocktail party in Quantum of Solace. Light blue can give the ensemble a friendlier look. Striped shirts are okay, so long as there aren’t multiple colours. Ties should be dark, like navy with all of Connery’s evening outfits; vivid, like the burgundy tie Moore wears with the marine blue suit in The Man with the Golden Gun; or lustrous, like Moore’s satin ties. The shinier a tie the dressier it is, and satin ties should be worn exclusively in the evening. Subtle patterns like on Daniel Craig’s ties are also great for the evening.

The Differences Between the Skyfall and Spectre Tom Ford O’Connor Suits

The Tom Ford O'Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

The Tom Ford O’Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

Costume designer Jany Temime updated the style of the Tom Ford O’Connor suit for Spectre from her and Tom Ford’s original design made for Skyfall. The style changes are easy change to identify, and the biggest difference is the lapel roll. Both suits have three buttons, but whilst the lapel ends just below the top button on the Skyfall jackets, the lapels rolls to the middle button and completely over the top button on the Spectre suits. This is known as a three-roll-two. The lower foreparts—or quarters—of the Spectre jackets are more cutaway than on the Skyfall jackets, but this results in a triangle of shirt showing between the fastened jacket button and top of the trousers. This is not a problem with the jacket but rather a problem with the trousers’ low rise. The lapel roll and quarters on the Spectre suit jackets emphasise the silhouette’s dramatic shape better than the straighter button three front of the Skyfall suit jackets does.

The Spectre O’Connor jackets have four buttons on the cuffs instead of the three buttons that are on the cuffs of the Skyfall jackets. The other details of the jackets are the same: straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, gently slanted pockets and single vents.

The suit jackets in Spectre fit a little different from the suit jackets in Skyfall, but the jackets in both films share many of the same fit problems. The jackets are all fashionably short and have too much waist suppression. In comparison to the Skyfall jackets, the Spectre jackets have a fuller chest, wider shoulders and fuller sleeves. The tighter chest on the Skyfall jackets pulls open, and the narrower shoulders de-emphasise Daniel Craig’s herculean form. These fit comparisons are based on the fit of the jacket in comparison to Craig’s body.

The measurements of the jackets in both films may actually be the same, and because Daniel Craig is no longer so brawny, the jackets in Spectre may look fuller in the upper torso . His slimmer, but still fit, build in Spectre gives the suits an easier fit up top. Whilst the jackets in Skyfall look like they are a full size too small, the jackets in Spectre look like they are the right size (defined by the chest and shoulders) but just have too much waist suppression in the wrong places. Rather than the “shrunken” or “bursting out” look of Skyfall, the suit jackets in Spectre only look poorly shaped at the waist. It’s a slight improvement.

There’s nothing wrong with a closely fitted suit, but to be a well-fitting suit it needs to smoothly follow the contours of the body. Daniel Craig’s suits in both Skyfall and Spectre do not do a good job of following his figure. If the goal is to show off Craig’s physique, a suit that perfectly follows his body with smooth, clean lines will show it off better than a suit with a distorted shape and stressed creasing.

The suit trousers didn’t change much from Skyfall to Spectre. In both films they have a low rise, which seems even lower because the trousers tend to sag down. The trousers are made in the same style in both films, with a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. The trousers in Spectre were hemmed a bit shorter than they were in Skyfall.

Daniel Craig wears four Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre: a two-piece blue and black Prince of Wales check with a light blue windowpane, a two-piece grey herringbone with a track stripe, a two-piece blue sharkskin and a three-piece anthracite pin point damier check. All of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall were made in the O’Connor style.

The Thomas Crown Affair: Date Night in a Midnight Blue Suit


Pierce Brosnan wears a large variety of suits from Milanese tailor Gianni Campagna as Thomas Crown in his 1999 film The Thomas Crown Affair. The Campagna suits cost $3,400 each at the time, and they are made of Super 150s wool. For a date with insurance investigator Catherine Banning (Rene Russo) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Cipriani, Crown wears a midnight blue suit. Midnight blue is ordinarily reserved for dinner suits, but the ultra dark shade of blue is also the perfect colour for a suit worn for a less formal evening out.


The suit jacket buttons three, and the lapels roll gently over the top button. It is cut with a clean chest and has straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket has double vents, straight pockets with flaps and four buttons on the cuffs. When Banning is cold at the museum, Crown gentlemanly removes his jacket and places it over her shoulders. The suit trousers are belted and have double reverse pleats and tapered legs.


Crown’s french blue poplin shirt from Turnbull & Asser has a spread collar, double cuffs with the link holes close to the fold, a narrow front placket and shoulder pleats in back. The shirt has gauntlet buttons on the sleeves, which means that if it is a ready to wear shirt it is made of Sea Island cotton since those are the only shirts Turnbull & Asser adorns with gauntlet buttons. The royal blue silk tie—likely in a satin weave—is a bit darker than the shirt. In the late 1990s it was fashionable to wear ties that were close to or matching the colour of the shirt, but there is a good amount of contrast in this outfit for a tasteful shirt and tie combination. Crown ties the tie in a four-in-hand knot with a dimple. With the suit, Crown wears black oxfords and a black belt.


Goldfinger’s Golfing Suit and Cardigan


For golf with James Bond in Goldfinger, Auric Goldfinger wears a traditional English country sports outfit in colours that both flatter his warm autumn complexion and reflect his love for gold. Compared to James Bond’s more modern polo and v-neck jumper golf outfit, Goldfinger looks very old-fashioned. His medium brown—rather like burnt umber—tweed three-piece sports suit unusually includes a jacket, plus-fours, and a flat cap.


The suit jacket, which Goldfinger removes when golfing, has softly padded shoulders with natural sleeveheads and a draped chest, which attempts to gives Goldfinger the illusion of a waist. The jacket has one button on the front, which attempts to give him a more streamlined look. It is detailed with three buttons on the cuff, a single vent and open patch pockets for a sporty look.

Instead of ordinary long trousers, this suit has a type of breeches called plus-fours. They are called plus-fours because they extend four inches below the knee. There are double forward pleats on either side at the top. At the bottom the breeches’ wide legs fasten around Goldfinger’s legs, and the fullness of the breeches’ legs blouses over. Plus-fours are a classic style of trousers for the golf course.


Under the suit jacket, Goldfinger wears a golden yellow cardigan in a very open, crunchy-looking knit wool. The cardigan fastens with six buttons and has small patch pockets. Under the cardigan, Goldfinger wears a cream shirt with a short, rounded point collar and double cuffs. Though the collar is rounded, it’s not as round as a club collar. The tie has stripes in light and dark golds, and dark, medium and light browns. The tie connects all the parts of the outfit perfectly.

Goldfinger’s shoes are chestnut brown bluchers, which are a single piece through the vamp and quarters with a heel counter and tabs sewn to the front for the four-eyelet lacing. With plus-fours, Goldfinger’s plain beige wool socks are on display. On his left hand, Goldfinger wears a golf glove in yellow and brown.


This outfit closely reflects what Goldfinger wears in Ian Fleming’s 1959 novel:

But Goldfinger had made an attempt to look smart at golf and that is the only way of dressing that is incongruous on a links. Everything matched in a blaze of rust-coloured tweed from the buttoned ‘golfer’s cap’ centred on the huge, flaming red hair, to the brilliantly polished, almost orange shoes. The plus-four suit was too well cut and the plus-fours themselves had been pressed down the sides. The stockings were of a matching heather mixture and had green garter tabs. It was as if Goldfinger had gone to his tailor and said, ‘Dress me for golf – you know, like they wear in Scotland.’ Social errors made no impression on Bond, and for the matter of that he rarely noticed them. With Goldfinger it was different. Everything about the man had grated on Bond’s teeth from the first moment he had seen him. The assertive blatancy of his clothes was just part of the malevolent animal magnetism that had affected Bond from the beginning.

The Final Spectre Trailer: Blue Sharkskin Suit and Light Brown Jacket


In the final Spectre trailer we get a look at two tailored outfits we haven’t seen much of before. The first is a blue sharkskin suit—woven in dark blue and light blue yarns—that we got a glimpse of in the full-length trailer. We also saw this outfit on a few of the final posters for Spectre. The final trailer features some great shots of this suit, and it’s the same as the other Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre. The button three roll two suit jacket has straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close fit and a short length. It is detailed with a single vent, slightly slanted flap pockets and four cuff buttons (with the last button worn open). The suit trousers have a flat front, narrow straight legs with turn-ups, and wide extended waistband with side adjusters,

With this suit, Bond wears a white shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. He matches the shirt with a folded white handkerchief in his breast pocket. The solid dark navy ottoman tie matches the darker yarns in the suit, and Bond ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Bond wears black, Dainite studded rubber-soled derby shoes with this suit with this suit, and they’re the Norwich model from Crockett & Jones.

Of all the looks that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre, this is the most classic Bond suit, and its elegant simplicity will prove to make this a memorable outfit. The navy two-piece suit with a navy tie recalls combinations that Sean Connery wears in From Russia with Love, Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice. The white shirt recalls the navy herringbone flannel suit that Connery wears in Goldfinger, as well as the literary Bond’s usual outfit.


The other outfit from Spectre that we get a new look at is light brown jacket with tan trousers that Daniel Craig wears in Morocco, which has been previously shown in a publicity still. The jacket and trousers are so close in colour that they look like a mismatched suit, but the jacket is darker and has more texture than the trousers have. Neither item is from Tom Ford but actually from Brunello Cucinelli. The light brown button three jacket is made of a wool, linen and silk blend, and it is cut with soft shoulders and a close, short fit. Its fishmouth lapels have conspicuous pick stitching. The jacket also has slanted pockets, double vents and four cuff buttons with all fastened, if the jacket has working cuffs.

The flat front fawn-coloured trousers, which appear to be slightly lighter and smoother than the jacket, are likely a lightweight chino cotton or plain-weave cotton and linen blend. They have a low rise and narrow, straight legs. They are pressed with a crease, but the crease has faded and is not longer sharp. Craig wears them with what might be a brown woven leather belt with solid brown leather tab with holes on the end. The trousers may be the same trousers that Craig also wears with a navy Tom Ford polo and a tan suede jacket from Matchless.

My assessment that this is not a suit could be wrong, but if this is indeed a pairing of separate jacket and trousers, it would be James Bond’s first odd jacket since the navy double-breasted blazer in GoldenEye.

The white shirt may be from Tom Ford. The collar looks like it might be wider than the others in the film, which are point collars, but it is also a bit askew so it’s difficult accurately to assess the shape. The collar is the same point collar that Daniel Craig wears on his shirts with all the other O’Connor suits in Spectre, and the shirt has cocktail cuffs. The tie is rust brown knitted silk with a pointed wide end and a straight narrow end, which suggests it is from Tom Ford. Though most knitted ties have straight ends, Tom Ford and a some others sell similar ties. In the fashion of the infamous pink tie in Diamonds Are Forever, this tie is too short and ends a few inches above the trousers. This outfit unusually lacks a pocket square. The sunglasses are the Tom Ford Henry model.

Seeing Bond in light brown again makes us recall Roger Moore, and this outfit is similar to but more casual and relaxed than any of the brown suits or tan sports coats that Moore wears in his Bond films. Let us not forget the tan suit that Timothy Dalton wears in The Living Daylights, also worn in Morocco like this brown outfit in Spectre. Dalton dresses his suit down by forgoing the tie, but even though Craig wears a tie with this outfit it still has the same casual demeanour. Like on Moore, the light brown jacket is flattering to Daniel Craig’s complexion.

Due to only having a brief shot of this brown outfit in the trailer and only one still, the observations on this outfit may not be entirely accurate and are highly subject to change.

The Quiller Memorandum: A Dependable Grey Suit


The popularity of the spy genre in the 1960s brought us the 1966 film The Quiller Memorandum. The character Qullier was originally written by novelist Elleston Trevor—under the pseudonym Adam Hall—as a British agent in the 1965 novel The Berlin Memorandum. In The Quiller Memorandum he is an American played by American actor George Segal, but he is still working for the British.


The Quiller Memorandum has a few things in common with the James Bond series, including a John Barry score (which is very different from his Bond scores), a song sung by “From Russia With Love” singer Matt Monro, and a villain played by Max von Sydow (who played Blofed in the unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again). Though the film is not especially unique or interesting, the main character is well-dressed in a Bond-like manner. Like Cary Grant does in North By Northwest, George Segal wears a single suit throughout almost the entire film. Only in the final scene of the film does Segal change his clothes. But unlike in Northwest By Northwest, the suit in The Quiller Memorandum never has a chance to get cleaned.


Though Quiller is an American in this film, the film was made in England and Germany, and George Segal is almost certainly wearing an English suit. Like Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, Segal’s suit has an unassuming look that is perfect for a spy. The suit is tailored in a Bond-like lightweight medium grey pick-and-pick wool and has a similar cut to Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, but with a few notable differences. The suits are similar in that jackets both button two and are cut with soft shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a full chest, a gently nipped waist and narrow lapels. Instead of the low button stance on Connery’s suit jackets, Segal’s suit jacket has a medium button stance.


Segal’s suit jacket is cut with a slightly short length to reflect the contemporary trends, but the jacket is just long enough to cover his buttocks. It is detailed with jetted pockets, three cuff buttons and double vents. Black buttons contrast with the jacket. The suit trousers have an extended waistband with a hidden hook-and-eye closure, “Daks top” side adjusters with two buttons, slanted side pockets, front darts (positioned in front of the pockets) and straight legs with turn-ups.

Under the suit, Segal wears an ecru shirt with a point collar that has a lot of tie space, a front placket and rounded single-button cuffs. The cuff button is placed near the base of the cuff. The textured burgundy tie is very flattering to Segal’s warm spring complexion and blonde hair, and he ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Segal wears black lace-up shoes with his suit.


George Segal wears clothes by On Her Majesty’s Secret Service tailor Dimi Major in the 1973 film A Touch of Class. The suit in The Quiller Memorandum shares a slight resemblance with Dimi Major’s cut, and the shoulders on Segal’s suits in A Touch of Class look identical to this suit’s shoulders. The Quiller suit lacks the fashionable flair that could be found on George Lazenby’s suits three years later, and though the shape of the jacket’s lapels is different, the trouser style is the same. There is a possibility that Dimi Major could have made this suit.


Layer Cake: A Navy Pinstripe Suit Jacket with Jeans


In the 2004 film Layer Cake, Daniel Craig wears striped suit jackets with jeans instead of the matching suit trousers. It was a popular fashion trend at that time, and it is still popular in some circles. Just as the mullet hairstyle has been described as “business in the front, party in the back”, wearing a pinstriped suit jacket with jeans has a similar effect. The suit jacket on the top is all business whilst the denim jeans on the bottom are as casual as trousers can be. Those who favour the mullet may see some appeal in this unorthodox combination, but like the mullet, this is not a conventionally attractive look. It’s difficult to make any tailored jacket look good with jeans, but rustic tweeds come closest since they match the rough, heavy look of denim. Robert Redford shows a great example of how to pair a tweed jacket with jeans in the 1975 film Three Days of the Condor.


Craig’s jacket in Layer Cake can by no means be called a sports coat. Sports coats are, as the name suggests, sporty, whilst pinstriped jackets are business wear and part of a suit. The main thing that separates a suit jacket from a sports coat is the cloth it is made from. Sports coats are made from a material that has texture, whether it’s tweed, hopsack, cashmere, silk, linen, corduroy or any number of other materials. These materials are either solid or have a checked pattern. Suits can also be made of any of these textured materials, but they would informal sports suits and not business suits. Business suits are typically made from smooth worsteds and sometimes flannel. They may be solid, semi-solid, striped or have a subtle check.


Certain cloths can work for both business suits and sports coats, like solid navy serge, bolder checks and woollen flannel. Jackets in these materials, however, need sporty details to make them work as sports coats, These details may include contrasting buttons, swelled edges, patch pockets or slanted pockets. But most worsteds don’t work well as odd jackets, especially not jackets with pinstripes or chalk stripes. And you can’t just put contrasting horn buttons on any suit jacket and turn it into a sports coat.

Daniel Craig’s navy pinstripe jacket is a suit jacket because it is made in a worsted business suit material. The button two jacket is tailored with straight shoulders, gently roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It was most likely purchased ready-to-wear from an English brand. The jacket has a high button stance, straight flap pockets, four buttons on the cuffs and double vents. The jacket mostly fits well, though the sleeves are too long.


Craig wears the suit jacket with medium wash denim jeans. The jeans have a medium-low rise, five pocket design and straight legs. A wide brown belt holds up the jeans. Craig’s shoes are dark brown chelsea boots.

Craig wears two different shirts with this outfit, a white formal shirt and a grey t-shirt. The white shirt has a tall two-button spread collar, two-button cuffs, front placket stitched 3/8″ from the edge in the traditional English fashion. The placket means that the shirt is from an English brand, and the tall collar likely signifies a brand with a slight fashion edge or a special fashion line. Craig wears the shirt tucked into his jeans.


When Craig doesn’t wear the white shirt, he wears only a grey crew neck, raglan-sleeve t-shirt under the jacket. Unlike with the white shirt, Craig does not tuck the t-shirt. Though the body of the shirt drapes over Craig’s body, the short sleeves fit tightly around his upper arm. Though t-shirts go well with jeans, it makes the suit jacket look even more out of place with the jeans. T-shirts have a practical disadvantage with tailored jackets. Whilst shirts with a collar and long sleeves protect the jacket from the body’s oils and shedding, t-shirts offer the jacket not protection. Because jackets are considerably more expensive than shirts are, it makes sense to protect them.


Basted for Bond: Examining Roger Moore’s Douglas Hayward Clothes

The latest “Basted for Bond” infographic breaks down the jackets, trousers and waistcoats that Roger Moore wears in For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy and A View to a Kill, made by legendary celebrity tailor Douglas Hayward. Though the low button two jacket is the mainstay of Moore’s Hayward wardrobe, he also wears button three jackets, very low-buttoning double-breasted jackets and a morning coat, all and more examined in the following infographic.