Silva: Cream Jacket and Printed Shirt

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Raoul Silva, played by Javier Bardem in Skyfall, is one of the most flamboyantly-dressed villains, yet he’s a well-tailored one. His cream silk jacket fits almost perfectly, the only problem being that the sleeve are too long. It’s made by Mayfair tailor Thom Sweeney, so it’s nice to see a second character in Skyfall—the first being Gareth Mallory—wearing bespoke English tailoring. The button two silk jacket is elegantly-tailored in the English style with softly-padded shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The jacket is tailored with classic proportions; the lapels are a balanced width, the length covers his behind and the jacket is closely fitted but not tight. The jacket has slanted hip pockets, double vents, four buttons on the cuffs, and dark brown corozo nut buttons.

Silva-Cream-Jacket-2Under the jacket, Silva wears a waistcoat and trousers in dark olive tropical wool or mohair. The waistcoat has five buttons, and Silva unstylishly fastens the bottom button. However, if he left the waistcoat’s bottom button open the shirt underneath may be exposed since the trousers have a somewhat low rise. The trousers’ waistband is visible in the notch of the bottom of the waistcoat. The waistcoat has narrow lapels and a small, full collar that are worn flipped up. The trousers have a flat front and plain hem.

Silva-Cream-Jacket-3Silva’s shirt from Prada is the flashiest part of his outfit. The shirt’s printed pattern consists of tan tiles with a white border and navy tiles with a tan border on a black ground. The shirt has a point collar, rounded single-button cuffs and dark buttons. Silva wears the collar button and first button open. Because of how flashy the shirt is, the necktie isn’t missed. It can be awkward to wear a waistcoat without a tie, but the waistcoat’s purpose here is to tone down the outfit by covering the shirt rather than to dress up the outfit. By flipping up the waistcoat’s collar and lapels, Silva rejects the additional formality that the waistcoat would ordinarily give the outfit. This is not a way I would recommend anyone wear a waistcoat, but when you’re a Bond villain you can dress as you please.

Silva’s medium brown chelsea boots add an additional level of flamboyance to his outfit. Though chelsea boots are typically very clean and sleek, Silva’s chelsea boots have an excessive amount of brogueing and far more seams than typical chelsea boots. They have a toe cap as well as a decorative strip of leather across the vamp. Apart from brogueing on every seam, they also have a toe medallion. The boots have thick double leather soles.

Costume designer Jany Temime dressed Silva appropriately in a garish and outrageous manner that perfectly suits the insane Bond villain.

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Navy Topcoat

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Daniel Craig wears an elegant, though somewhat unremarkable, navy topcoat from Tom Ford in Skyfall over his glen check and navy herringbone suits. At a three-quarter length, it’s like a longer, heavier suit jacket that isn’t cut away in front. It has three buttons to show on front, but Daniel Craig fastens only the middle button like a suit jacket in the topcoat’s first appearance. He fastens the middle and bottom buttons in the topcoat’s second appearance. It’s difficult to tell if Daniel Craig is leaving buttons open as a fashion statement or because the coat is too tight to comfortably close the top button. It doesn’t look bad the way he wears it, but at the same time it looks affected. If he’s wearing a topcoat because it’s cold outside, why not make the most of the coat and fasten all of the buttons? Unlike on a button three lounge coat (a.k.a. suit jacket), the buttons on an overcoat fall in a straight line. Thus visually the straight line is preserved by either fastening all of the buttons, like how Connery wears his topcoat in Thunderball, or fastening none, like Pierce Brosnan does in GoldenEye.

Navy-Topcoat-3The coat is cut with straight and narrow shoulders, and the front is darted for a shaped silhouette. The cuffs button three, and like on his suit jacket, Daniel Craig leaves the last button open. The coat has straight, flapped pockets, a welted breast pocket and a deep single vent. Whilst it’s a very nice coat, a fly that hides the buttons could have made this a more elegant coat.

With the coat’s second appearance on a London rooftop, Craig wears black leather gloves and a medium grey cashmere scarf in a parisian knot. The parisian knot is tied by folding the scarf in half, draping it over the neck and inserting the dangling ends of the scarf together through the loop created at the folded end. The parisian knot works best with longer, lighter scarves. Folding the scarf in half takes up a lot of length, and in a heavier scarf the knot can end up very bulky. Bulkiness, however, can be a benefit in very cold weather. The parisian knot is an easy and effective way to wear the scarf, and Craig tucks the ends into his coat. The scarf and gloves show that this is a colder scene than the earlier one, and Craig also flips up his collar for extra protection from the cold. But again, if it’s that cold outside why does he leave the top button open? The most logical reason would be that the topcoat is too small—like most of the tailored clothes in Skyfall—to properly close.

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Gareth Mallory: The Double-Breasted Suit

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Gareth Mallory, played by Ralph Fiennes, wears a double-breasted suit after becoming the new M in Skyfall. The double-breasted suit, however, makes him look more like Bill Tanner in For Your Eyes Only than the first two Ms. Today the double-breasted suit is a more traditional look, and that’s likely why costume designer Jany Temime dressed Fiennes in this suit for this scene instead of the more contemporary two- and three-piece suits he wears prior to becoming M. Another thing that makes this suit look more traditional is the soft, heavy navy woollen flannel chalkstripe cloth. Heavier cloths look more old-fashioned than lightweight cloths. Since Bond has just come in from the cold and has hung up his overcoat, M’s choice of a heavy flannel suit is clearly a very practical one.

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The suit jacket has the classic arrangement of six buttons with two to button, and Mallory buttons only the top of those two buttons. The jacket also has double vents, four-button cuffs and flapped pockets. This suit has the same straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads that Mallory’s other suits in the film have, but a fuller chest and wider lapels contribute to its more traditional look. It has a classic Savile Row cut: nipped at the waist and flared at the skirt. Whilst the suit is a little old-fashioned, it isn’t outdated and it looks great on Ralph Fiennes. It’s made by Timothy Everest, who typically makes more fashion forward suit.

Not much is seen of the suit trousers, but they are likely the same flat-front, tapered-leg trouser with braces he wears throughout the film. Mallory wears a cornflower blue shirt with a spread collar and double cuffs. His red ribbed silk tie is tied in a four-in-hand knot. James Bond has also worn a similar outfit of a flannel navy chalkstripe suit with a blue shirt and red tie, thought Bond’s suit was a three-piece suit and not double-breasted. He wears this outfit for his meeting with Sir Hilary Bray in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

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The Navy Small Herringbone Suit

Navy-Small-Herringbone-SuitDaniel Craig’s Tom Ford suit in the final scene of Skyfall is dark navy in a small herringbone, or mini bone, weave. The small herringbone weaves gives the cloth a narrow self-stripe look whilst being one solid colour. Like the other three lounge suits in Skyfall, the jacket is a button three with straight, narrow shoulders, a single vent and gently sloped pockets. Craig leaves the last button open on his button three cuffs. Like all of the suits in Skyfall, the jacket is short and doesn’t completely cover his buttocks, and the chest is tight, causing it to pull open where it isn’t designed to. Though such a fit is currently fashionable, until a few years ago these were marks of a poor fit. The collar on this suit jacket does not hug the shirt collar, which is another mark of a poor fit.

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Click the photo to enlarge and look for the pick stitching on the edge of the lapels.

Though it’s on all of the suits in Skyfall—and most of the suits in the entire James Bond series—the pick stitching along the edge of the lapels and on the pockets is especially visible on this suit. It’s more visible on this suit because the cloth is solid and lightweight. The pick stitch—also called a prick stitch—is a handmade running stitch along the edges that, when executed well, should be almost invisible. It keeps the edge firm and prevents it from puffing up. To be more fashionable, some tailors use a heavier or contrasting thread to make it more noticeable.

Craig wears a light blue shirt with a tab collar, front placket and double cuffs. It looks like grey because of the warm lighting that desaturates the blues and gives the scene an older feel. His folded cotton pocket handkerchief matches the shirt. His tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot, is in a small basket-weave pattern of either mid grey and black or mid grey and dark navy. The latter would make more sense with the outfit overall, but it’s difficult to tell.

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The Fancy Rope Stripe Suit

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The nicest part of every Tom Ford suit in Skyfall is the suiting. The proper use of the term “suiting” is to describe the cloth a suit is made from; it’s not another word for a suit or multiple suits, like the way some brands have recently started using the term to sound more sophisticated (they don’t!). Tom Ford puts far more importance on the quality of his suiting than most fashion designers do. This suiting from Skyfall looks like a basic charcoal with a narrow-spaced grey rope stripe, but it’s a little fancier than that. The cloth is twill-woven, except on either side of each rope stripe there is a plain-woven section framing the stripe. It adds a subtle dimension to the cloth whilst still keeping it classic.

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The cut and style of this suit is the same as the other suits in the film. The fit is tight and short, with narrow, straight shoulders. The jacket buttons three and the narrow lapels roll at the top button, though the tight fit in the chest pulls it open down to the fastened middle button. It is not a three-roll-two like the Quantum of Solace suits. The buttons are placed lower than on most current suits, which is both bad and good. The bad part is that it emphasises how short the jacket is, and the buttons look very low on the jacket. But the good part is that the middle button fastens exactly where it should: at the waist. The button at the waist means that not as much shirt can show above the trousers as on the typical “slim fit” suit, and it helps the jacket to move better with the body. A lower button stance also makes the chest look stronger, which is why a high button stance is rarely a good thing. The flapped hip pockets are on a shallow slant, and the cuffs have three buttons with last one left open. There is a single vent at the rear. The suit trousers have a flat front and are cut with a low rise and narrow leg, and they have a short hem with turn-ups. The trousers have side adjusters with slide buckles and an extended waistband with hook closure.

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Bond’s pale blue poplin shirt—also made by Tom Ford—has a soft tab collar, a placket down the front and double cuffs. A pale blue cotton handkerchief folded in the pocket matches the shirt. The tie is made in the same weave as the black and silver tie worn with the pick-and-pick suit earlier in the film. This one is a pattern of light blue-grey and charcoal. The shoes are the black Crockett & Jones Highbury model, a 3-eyelet derby with Dainite rubber studded soles. The Dainite soles are useful in the scenes where this suit is worn because they provide the extra needed traction over traditional leather soles.

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The Skyfall Glen Plaid Suit

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For Skyfall, costume designer Jany Temime chose classic cloths that respect James Bond’s sartorial history, even if the fashionable cut of the suits does not. One of these cloths is a glen plaid in mid grey and black. Connery’s Bond wore a number of glen plaid suits in his Bond films, usually in a finer pattern. This one is most similar to the classic black and white Glen Urquhart check Bond wore in From Russia With Love. Tom Ford calls this a Prince of Wales check, however the original Prince of Wales check was much larger design in rust-brown and white with a navy box of six ends around the four and four (large houndstooth) section. However, the term is very often used to refer to any check based on the Glen Urquhart check, and whether the usage is correct or not is up to you.

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The cut and style of this suit is exactly the same as the other Tom Ford suits in the film. The fit is skin-tight, with narrow, straight shoulders. The jacket buttons three and the narrow lapels roll at the top button, though the suit is so tight that the front pulls open at the top button. The flapped hip pockets are on a shallow slant, to hint at the classic English style but not to draw attention to it. The cuffs have three buttons and the last one is left open. There is a single vent at the rear, and the vent is cut with extra overlap as to prevent Bond’s rear from showing. The suit trousers have a flat front and are cut with a low rise and narrow leg. They have side adjusters and an extended waistband with hook closure.

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Bond’s sky blue poplin shirt—also made by Tom Ford—has a soft tab collar, a placket down the front and double cuffs. A sky blue cotton handkerchief folded in the pocket matches the shirt. The tie is a square check in blue and alternating black and light grey. The black and light grey in the tie complement the black and grey in the suit. The shoes are the black Crockett & Jones Highbury model, a 3-eyelet derby with Dainite rubber studded soles. Dainite soles are not quite as elegant as the classic leather soles—and they can also feel very stiff in my experience—but they do provide Bond with the extra traction he needs. As far as rubber soles go on dress shoes, Dainite studded soles are amongst the best.

There's no excuse for the jacket's collar standing away from the neck.

There’s no excuse for the jacket’s collar standing away from the neck.

Winter Clothes in Shanghai: The Navy Pea Coat

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James Bond wears a navy pea coat for the second time in the series in Skyfall, after first wearing a pea coat in the opening scene of Casino Royale. It’s surprising that Bond never wore a pea coat before Daniel Craig took over since it’s a natural choice of casual coats for a naval man. The pea coat has six buttons on the front but Bond only fastens the middle button, it would appear because the coat is too tight to fasten the other buttons. Bond’s pea coat deviates from tradition with peak lapels rather than being able to button to the neck. There are four pockets on the front: two slash pockets on the chest and two horizontal flap pockets on the hips. Behind the collar and underneath the pocket flaps the coat is trimmed with brown leather. And rather than having the typical black plastic pea coat buttons with anchors this coat has dark brown horn buttons, which are more civilian and more elegant.

Skyfall-JumperUnderneath the pea coat Bond wears a white shirt with a semi-spread collar, plain front and single-button cuffs with rounded corners. The back is darted for a closer fit. The black silk tie has a texture woven with floats that somewhat mimics the look of a grenadine garza fina silk. Over the shirt and tie Bond wears a black wool V-neck jumper. Bond folds back the cuff of the jumper’s sleeve to elegantly reveal a little bit of white shirt cuff. Bond has never worn a tie with a casual outfit before, and he typically wears an open-neck shirt under his jumpers. The jumper over a tie is a very school-boy look and it appears that costume designer Jany Temime brought that look over from her work on the Harry Potter films. The shirt’s collar points sit under the jumper on one side and pop out on the other. The V is a bit too shallow to wear with a tie, since most of it is obscured. The jumper’s collar is almost like a deep crew neck rather than a V-neck. A shirt without a tie would have worked better with this jumper.

Skyfall-Peacoat-2The flat-front wool trousers are in a black and light grey sharkskin weave. They are cut with a long rise to the waist and have many Savile Row-type details, like an extended waistband with a hook closure, button-tab waist adjusters, a coin pocket on the front under the waistband, and only one rear button-through pocket on the right. The black 2-eyelet chukka boots are the Crockett & Jones Tetbury model. He also wears black unlined leather gloves.

Thanks to the Bond collectors at ajb007.co.uk, the sources for all these items have been identified. The pea coat is from Billy Reid, the shirt and tie are from COS, the jumper is from John Smedley, the trousers are from Acne and the gloves are from Dents.

The Barbour Sports Jacket

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Skyfall‘s costume designer Jany Temime introduced a British icon to the Bond series: the Barbour jacket. Barbour is famous for its waxed cotton jackets, which are both waterproof and stylish. Bernhard Roetzel praises the Barbour in his book Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion:

This jacket protects you from bad weather, but it also protects you from the risk of being improperly dressed. And it’s true: if you are not sure what to put on you can always fall back on the Barbour – as long as it’s not too warm, that is.

And Roetzel means that literally, even going as far to say it is better to wear a Barbour and a sweater than a poorly-fitting dinner suit. Perhaps costume designers in the past may have thought the Barbour is too recognisable or too snobbish for Bond, but it’s an appropriate jacket for Bond to wear in a casual country setting.

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Bond’s Barbour jacket in Skyfall is a limited edition by To Ki To, designed by Tokihito Yoshida, in olive waxed cotton, cut similarly to a lounge coat. It has three large buttons on the front, with the top button placed further apart. Further up the lapels there is a tab and smaller button (which has been removed), but the tab is held back with a button under the lapel. If the tab were extended, the button that Bond uses to hold it back would be used to secure a throat latch to the chest. The throat latch would also attach to buttons on either side of the collar, which have also been removed. There is also another small button that closes the top of the lapels. The shoulders have patches of a different, greener material. The front of the jacket has two flapped bellows pockets on the hips, with the bellows made from the same material as the shoulder patches. There is also a flapped, inset breast pocket, and the back of the jacket has vertical zip pockets on the sides of the skirt.  The jacket comes with a hood, but since the hood is not worn the zip and buttons that the hood attaches to has been removed. The sleeve openings are finished with a stripe of brown leather binding. A lot has been removed from the original jacket to streamline it to just Bond’s needs.

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Underneath the Barbour Bond wears a cashmere round neck jumper by N.Peal in “Blue Wave,” with a brown scarf tucked in to the jumper. And under the jumper Bond wears an off-white, long-sleeve henley shirt. His trousers are dark brown cords—the Conduane Iggy Jeans from All Saints. The wing-tip boots are the Crockett & Jones Islay model in Dark Brown Scotch Grain with Dainite rubber soles.

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Barbour, N.Peal and Crockett & Jones are all taking advantage of the Bond connection to advertise their products. For the rest of the items, I thank the collectors at ajb007 for their research. More images will come following the Blu-ray release.