Anthracite Damier Three-Piece Suit in Spectre

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When Bond visits Q’s lab at the end of Spectre, he wears a sporty checked three-piece suit from Tom Ford. Bond has worn few sporty three-piece suits in the series, and this one follows the iconic three-piece glen check suit from Goldfinger loosely in idea but neither in execution nor iconography. Like the glen check suit in Goldfinger, it’s a suit for relaxed Bond rather than a 00-agent ready for business. And being a three-piece, it shows shows that Bond is a man who appreciates fine clothes even when he doesn’t need to dress up. Though it’s a sporty suit, the dark grey colour, smooth finish and waistcoat also make this a fairly dressy suit, but it’s not a business suit.

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The suit is anthracite—a very dark charcoal—with a pin-point damier check. A true damier is a checkerboard pattern whilst this pattern is more like a variation on the shepherd check. It’s a check made up of pin dots with a 32-yarn repeat in both the warp and the weft. For 16 of the 32 yarns in each direction there is a yarn that creates a line of white pin dots every four yarns. The overall effect is a dark grey check. The content of the suiting is 70% wool, 18% silk and 12% mohair. The silk and mohair give the cloth a subtle sheen and increase its formality.

Like the two-piece suits in Spectre, this suit is the O’Connor model designed by Spectre’s costumer designer Jany Temime along with Tom Ford. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open. Like the other O’Connor suit jackets, this suit jacket is too short and too tight. This suit jacket is tighter than the rest because of the waistcoat underneath.

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The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button. The bottom button is placed on the cutaway portion of the waistcoat, and the bottom button and buttonhole do not line up. The waistcoat has four curved “barchetta” welt pockets. The low-rise suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets and narrow straight legs.

Under the suit, Bond wears a sky blue cotton poplin shirt with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit in the small of the back. He matches the shirt with a folded sky blue handkerchief in his suit jacket’s breast pocket. The tie is solid black—in what may be a panama weave—and tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond’s shoes are likely the Crockett & Jones Norwich model: black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

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The Navy Sharkskin Suit in Spectre

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When James Bond enters his room at Franz Oberhauser’s desert crater lair in Spectre, he finds a blue sharkskin suit laid out on the bed for him. Bond is expected to wear this suit when joining Oberhauser for afternoon drinks. The suit from Tom Ford is in the same O’Connor model as most of the other suits in Spectre, even though this is technically not Bond’s own suit but rather one that was only provided for him. This could give an excuse for this suit’s fit problems, but that excuse doesn’t hold up considering all of the O’Connor suits in the film fit the same way.

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The suiting is a 100% wool super 110s sharkskin (also known as pick-and-pick) woven with dark and light blue yarns for an iridescent look. Though there’s no mohair content in the cloth, the different blues in it give it a shiny 1960s look. Depending on lighting, the suit can look anywhere from dark navy to medium blue. In person, the suiting is brighter and more vivid than it looks on screen. This suit is perfect for social occasions, both during the day under the sun and in the evening under artificial light. The cloth is too shiny for most business.

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Being the O’Connor model designed by Spectre‘s costumer designer Jany Temime and Tom Ford, the cut and details match many of the other suits in the film. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway for a dynamic “X” on the front of the jacket. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open.

The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise, which reveals a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The trousers with this suit look even shorter than the trousers in the rest of the film and don’t even touch the shoes. High-water trousers don’t serve a purpose in the desert!

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With this suit Bond wears a white cotton poplin shirt with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit in the small of the back. The shirt has a close fit overall, but it’s not too tight like the suit jacket is. He matches the shirt with a folded white handkerchief in his suit jacket’s breast pocket. The tie is dark navy silk repp in a colour Tom Ford calls “ink”. It is darker than the suit, but the hue is the same as the suit’s so it matches well. The tie is 7.5 cm/3 inches wide, and it’s tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

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Crockett & Jones Norwich

This suit is likely the same suit that is in the gun barrel sequence at the start of the film.

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Some of the images here have been colour-corrected due to the filters on the film that make it look overly warm.

The Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Crombie Coat in Spectre

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For visits to M’s office and to Q’s lab in Spectre, James Bond wears a grey herringbone track strip suit from Tom Ford. Spectre continues in the long history of Bond films where Bond dresses in stripes in London. This suit’s cloth exchanges the standard pinstripe and chalk stripe for a cloth with more interest in the stripe and in the weave. The cloth is woven in a narrow herringbone weave, which changes direction every 16 yarns. The cloth is woven with medium grey in the warp and charcoal grey in the weft for an overall vibrant dark grey. There is a white track stripe where the herringbone changes direction. The track stripe is two single-yarn pinstripes spaced a yarn apart. Because the stripe is part of the herringbone weave, it has a soft chalk-stripe-like appearance.

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The suit is the O’Connor model designed by costume designer Jany Temime in collaboration with Tom Ford for Spectre, and it has the same cut and the same details that the other three O’Connor suits in the film have. The jacket has straight, padded shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway and reveal a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond ungentlemanly wears the last button open.

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The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise and are hemmed with no break, which means they are very short and cover little of the shoes.

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With the suit, Bond wears two different shirts and ties from Tom Ford. When he first visits M’s office he wears a white cotton poplin shirt with a medium-dark grey tie and no pocket handkerchief. Later when he goes to Q’s office he wears a sky blue shirt with a matching sky blue folded pocket handkerchief and a navy tie. The navy tie is a deep, rich blue and towards indigo on the spectrum. Tom Ford calls this tie “navy”, as opposed to the similar “ink” tie that Bond wears later in the film. The shirts are both in the same style and have a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit. The ties both are silk repp and 7.5 cm/3 inches wide. The sky blue shirt and navy tie are much more flattering to Craig’s complexion than the white shirt and grey tie since he looks better with less contrast.

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Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Over the suit Bond wears a navy “Crombie” coat, which is the name commonly used for a three-quarter-length chesterfield coat. Tom Ford does not use the name “Crombie” for this coat, which is trademarked by the British brand Crombie. However, this style of coat is most popularly associated with the Crombie brand. The coat is made of a luxurious 51% cashmere and 49% silk blend. It has structured padded shoulders and a darted front for a closely fitted silhouette. There are three buttons down the front, which are covered with a fly. Bond only fastens the coat’s middle button. The coat is detailed with straight flap hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket, a single vent and three buttons on the cuffs. The collar is cotton moleskin in a slightly lighter and more vivid blue than the rest of the coat. When Bond is on his way to Q’s lab he wears a long navy scarf warpped twice around the neck and looped over in front.

The crombie coat, from a cut scene in Spectre

The crombie coat, from a cut scene in Spectre

Bond rudely keeps his coat on in M’s office but takes it off in Q’s office. Neither Bond nor M appear to be in a rush in M’s office, so he has no excuse for wearing it. It makes the same suit look more different in the two separate scenes, when Bond really should have put on a different suit the next day. In Goldfinger, For Your Eyes Only, The Living Daylights and GoldenEye, Bond wears different suits on different days for his office visits and should have continued that tradition here.

The Blue Prince of Wales Suit in Spectre

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In Spectre‘s pre-title sequence in Mexico City, James Bond wears a blue Prince of Wales check wool suit from Tom Ford. A Prince of Wales check in this usage of the term is a glen check with an overcheck, which may also be called a windowpane. The glen check is medium blue and black whilst the overcheck is light blue in a more vivid tone in the warp than in the weft. A black and blue check makes this unusual compared to the more typical black and white and black and grey variations that Bond has worn in the past. The overcheck is a bold six yarns wide, which makes it the dominant pattern on the suit. Ordinarily, overchecks on a Prince of Wales check are thinner and stand out less. Because the overcheck on this suit is so dominant, it wouldn’t be inappropriate to call this a windowpane suit, but that oversimplifies what the suit’s pattern truly is.

Since the base of the suit’s cloth is medium blue and black, the colours blend together into an air force blue. The colour of the suit is still lighter and more vivid than an ordinary blue suit, but the colour looks perfect for Mexico City’s warm weather and helps Bond to stand out from the crowd during the Day of the Dead festival. The lighter blues in the suit are flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion and bring out his blue eyes.

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The jacket is the O’Connor model designed by costume designer Jany Temime in collaboration with Tom Ford for Spectre, with straight, padded shoulders that have roped sleeveheads, a close-fitting chest, a too-tight waist and a fashionably short length. The front has three buttons with narrow lapels rolled to the middle button for a button two look. The lower foreparts are cutaway and reveal a triangle of shirt below the jacket’s fastened button. The jacket is detailed with a single vent, slanted hip pockets, a curved “barchetta” breast pocket and four buttons on the cuffs. The last buttonhole on the cuffs is longer than the rest, and Bond wears the last button open.

The suit trousers have a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. They have a low rise and are hemmed with no break, which means they are very short and cover little of the shoes.

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With the suit, Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford with a point collar, double cuffs, a front placket and back darts, which give the shirt a close fit. A light blue shirt would make this outfit more flattering to Daniel Craig’s complexion, but it would have to be a very pale blue so there is contrast between the suit and shirt. The stark white shirt overpowers Craig’s complexion. The tie is a silk repp in medium blue, which Tom Ford call their “blue” shade. It is 7.5 cm/3 inches wide. The blue is a close match with the hue of the suit, which makes it a good match in the classic Connery Bond mode. Bond ties it in a narrow four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears a folded white linen handkerchief in his breast pocket.

The shoes are the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black calf five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles. The socks are a rather boring and unstylish black. Dark blue would have been a better choice, since it would extend the line of the too-short trouser legs.

A Black Herringbone Suit for a Funeral in Spectre

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James Bond’s black herringbone three-piece suit in Spectre introduces Tom Ford’s signature “Windsor” model to the Bond series. This model is characterised by wide peaked lapels and aggressive shoulders. The look is inspired by suits from the 1940s as well as by 1960s and 1970s British designer Tommy Nutter’s suits. Though Bond is in disguise as an Italian gangster, the style of his suit is much more British than it is Italian. Bold and flashy doesn’t mean it’s Italian, but it’s also not the look a traditional English gentleman would sport either.

Bond has typically avoided wearing solid black suits because they’re neither the most traditional nor the most stylish. They have their place at funerals, which makes this black suit fitting for the situation. The only other time Bond wears a solid black suit is to Morton Slumber’s funeral home in Diamonds Are Forever. That suit is also a three-piece, and this suit is its direct successor. Though black suits usually look dull, this suiting is woven in a large herringbone weave to give it texture so it doesn’t look flat. Whilst this suit is 100% wool, the herringbone weave means it reflects more light and ends up looking livelier and shinier. Seeing it in person, it’s brighter than all of the other blacks around, even though it is still black. This is the rare example of an exciting black suiting.

The jacket has straight shoulders with a heavy amount of padding and roped sleeveheads. There is fullness and shape in the chest, which gives it a more bespoke look and feel, but the chest still fits close to the body, as does the waist. The length is a bit on the short side. The front has two buttons at a medium stance and medium-wide peaked lapels with belly. Belly is the convex curve of the outer edge that makes the lapels look wider than they actually are. Tom Ford spoke about his preference for wide lapels in a documentary that aired on 23 October 2011 as the second episode of the television programme Visionaries: Inside the Creative Mind:

I like a big lapel. I’ve always hated little skinny lapels. It doesn’t mean I haven’t ever done them before, but I’ve always felt they feel a little sad, like you don’t have enough fabric.

The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with wide flaps and a ticket pocket. The breast pocket has a curved “barchetta” shape. There are five buttons on the cuffs, and the last button has a longer buttonhole and is left open. There is a single vent to the back.

The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button—the last button and buttonhole are placed on the cutaway part at the bottom and would strain if fastened. There are four curved welt pockets on the front that match the style of the jacket’s breast pocket.

The trousers have a flat front, a medium low rise and narrow, straight legs with plain hems. This is the only Tom Ford suit of all the Bond films to not have turn-ups on the trousers, and this suit may not have turn-ups because it is more formal than any other suit Daniel Craig has worn in his Bond films. The waistband has a square extension with a hidden hook-and-eye closure and slide-buckle adjusters at the sides. The side pockets are on the seam, which curves forward at the top.

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Costume designer Jany Temime was quoted about this outfit from Spectre on the James Bond 007 Facebook page:

Bond is in disguise and has to fit in with gangsters, moving in a daring way. The details in the shirt, the collar is more Italian style: it is Bond in disguise.

The white cotton poplin shirt from Tom Ford has a point collar with eyelets and metal bar, cocktail cuffs, a plain front and rear darts for a slim fit. Though Temime says the pinned collar is an Italian style, it’s not particularly Italian these days. It has some historical association with both Italians and Americans. Roger Moore wears a pinned collar in his 1976 film Street People when playing his Sicilian father in 1930s flashbacks. Pierce Brosnan almost always wears pinned collars during the first two series of Remington Steele, which reflected trends in America at the time as well as his character’s love for classic Hollywood films. Pinned collars are too fussy for James Bond to wear apart from being in disguise, and they’re not particularly appropriate for a modern British character.

Tom Ford calls the cocktail cuff on his shirts the “Dr. No cuff”, named after the first Bond film to feature Bond wearing shirts with cocktail cuffs. The cuff has a similarly rounded shape to the cocktail cuffs that Sean Connery wears in five of his Bond films, though the two buttons on this cuff are both positioned closer to the fold. The top button on this cuff is mostly hidden under the fold, whilst it’s always visible on Connery’s cuffs when has has both buttons fastened. Spectre is the ninth Bond film to feature James Bond wearing cocktail cuffs, after five films with Sean Connery and three films with Roger Moore. Turnbull & Asser made a bespoke cocktail cuff pattern for Pierce Brosnan when making shirts for Die Another Day, but no shirts cocktail cuffs were featured in that film.

The black-on-black woven check silk tie is 9.5 cm—or 3 3/4 inches—wide to go with the wide lapels on the suit jacket. The lapels are wider than the tie, though ties that are narrower than the lapels can still work. To fit his disguise as a gangster, Bond knots his tie in a windsor knot. Bond completes his outfit with a white silk handkerchief with a black border stuffed—rather than meticulously folded—into his breast pocket. The handkerchief measures 40 cm by 40 cm.

The boots that Bond wears with this suit are the flashy Crockett & Jones Camberley model in black calf. The style is best described as a double-monk boot, where the straps buckle from the inside quarter over the outside quarter. Like on monk shoes, the quarter are both over the tongue. This boot is not a Jodhpur boot, where the vamp and tongue are positioned on top of the quarters. Boots are a good match with narrow trousers because narrow trousers must be hemmed shorter, and thus boots will prevent sock from showing with shorter trousers. Whilst monk boots are not likely something the literary James Bond would wear, they satisfy his dislike for laces.

Bond wears this suit with a black double-breasted bridge coat, sunglasses and black driving gloves, which will be covered at a later date.

The Differences Between the Skyfall and Spectre Tom Ford O’Connor Suits

The Tom Ford O'Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

The Tom Ford O’Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

Costume designer Jany Temime updated the style of the Tom Ford O’Connor suit for Spectre from her and Tom Ford’s original design made for Skyfall. The style changes are easy change to identify, and the biggest difference is the lapel roll. Both suits have three buttons, but whilst the lapel ends just below the top button on the Skyfall jackets, the lapels rolls to the middle button and completely over the top button on the Spectre suits. This is known as a three-roll-two. The lower foreparts—or quarters—of the Spectre jackets are more cutaway than on the Skyfall jackets, but this results in a triangle of shirt showing between the fastened jacket button and top of the trousers. This is not a problem with the jacket but rather a problem with the trousers’ low rise. The lapel roll and quarters on the Spectre suit jackets emphasise the silhouette’s dramatic shape better than the straighter button three front of the Skyfall suit jackets does.

The Spectre O’Connor jackets have four buttons on the cuffs instead of the three buttons that are on the cuffs of the Skyfall jackets. The other details of the jackets are the same: straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, gently slanted pockets and single vents.

The suit jackets in Spectre fit a little different from the suit jackets in Skyfall, but the jackets in both films share many of the same fit problems. The jackets are all fashionably short and have too much waist suppression. In comparison to the Skyfall jackets, the Spectre jackets have a fuller chest, wider shoulders and fuller sleeves. The tighter chest on the Skyfall jackets pulls open, and the narrower shoulders de-emphasise Daniel Craig’s herculean form. These fit comparisons are based on the fit of the jacket in comparison to Craig’s body.

The measurements of the jackets in both films may actually be the same, and because Daniel Craig is no longer so brawny, the jackets in Spectre may look fuller in the upper torso . His slimmer, but still fit, build in Spectre gives the suits an easier fit up top. Whilst the jackets in Skyfall look like they are a full size too small, the jackets in Spectre look like they are the right size (defined by the chest and shoulders) but just have too much waist suppression in the wrong places. Rather than the “shrunken” or “bursting out” look of Skyfall, the suit jackets in Spectre only look poorly shaped at the waist. It’s a slight improvement.

There’s nothing wrong with a closely fitted suit, but to be a well-fitting suit it needs to smoothly follow the contours of the body. Daniel Craig’s suits in both Skyfall and Spectre do not do a good job of following his figure. If the goal is to show off Craig’s physique, a suit that perfectly follows his body with smooth, clean lines will show it off better than a suit with a distorted shape and stressed creasing.

The suit trousers didn’t change much from Skyfall to Spectre. In both films they have a low rise, which seems even lower because the trousers tend to sag down. The trousers are made in the same style in both films, with a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. The trousers in Spectre were hemmed a bit shorter than they were in Skyfall.

Daniel Craig wears four Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre: a two-piece blue and black Prince of Wales check with a light blue windowpane, a two-piece grey herringbone with a track stripe, a two-piece blue sharkskin and a three-piece anthracite pin point damier check. All of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall were made in the O’Connor style.

The Final Spectre Trailer: Blue Sharkskin Suit and Light Brown Jacket

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In the final Spectre trailer we get a look at two tailored outfits we haven’t seen much of before. The first is a blue sharkskin suit—woven in dark blue and light blue yarns—that we got a glimpse of in the full-length trailer. We also saw this outfit on a few of the final posters for Spectre. The final trailer features some great shots of this suit, and it’s the same as the other Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre. The button three roll two suit jacket has straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a close fit and a short length. It is detailed with a single vent, slightly slanted flap pockets and four cuff buttons (with the last button worn open). The suit trousers have a flat front, narrow straight legs with turn-ups, and wide extended waistband with side adjusters,

With this suit, Bond wears a white shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. He matches the shirt with a folded white handkerchief in his breast pocket. The solid dark navy ottoman tie matches the darker yarns in the suit, and Bond ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Bond wears black, Dainite studded rubber-soled derby shoes with this suit with this suit, and they’re the Norwich model from Crockett & Jones.

Of all the looks that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre, this is the most classic Bond suit, and its elegant simplicity will prove to make this a memorable outfit. The navy two-piece suit with a navy tie recalls combinations that Sean Connery wears in From Russia with Love, Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice. The white shirt recalls the navy herringbone flannel suit that Connery wears in Goldfinger, as well as the literary Bond’s usual outfit.

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The other outfit from Spectre that we get a new look at is light brown jacket with khaki trousers that Daniel Craig wears in Morocco, which has been previously shown in a publicity still. The jacket and trousers are so close in colour that they look like a mismatched suit, but the jacket is darker and has more texture than the trousers have. Neither item is from Tom Ford but actually from Brunello Cucinelli. The light brown button three jacket is made of a wool, linen and silk blend, and it is cut with soft shoulders and a close, short fit. Its fishmouth lapels have conspicuous pick stitching. The jacket also has slanted pockets, double vents and four cuff buttons with all fastened, if the jacket has working cuffs. This is James Bond’s first odd jacket since the navy double-breasted blazer in GoldenEye.

The flat front khaki trousers, which are slightly lighter and smoother than the jacket, are made of a lightweight chino cotton material. They have a low rise and narrow, straight legs. They are pressed with a crease, but the crease has faded and is not longer sharp. Craig wears them with a brown woven leather belt with a solid brown leather tab on the end with holes. The trousers may be the same trousers that Craig also wears with a navy Tom Ford polo and a tan suede jacket from Matchless.

The white shirt is from Tom Ford. The collar is the same point collar that Daniel Craig wears on his shirts with all the other O’Connor suits in Spectre, and the shirt has cocktail cuffs. The tie is rust brown knitted silk with a pointed wide end and a straight narrow end, which suggests it is from Tom Ford. Though most knitted ties have straight ends, Tom Ford and a some others sell similar ties. In the fashion of the infamous pink tie in Diamonds Are Forever, this tie is too short and ends a few inches above the trousers. This outfit unusually lacks a pocket square. The sunglasses are the Tom Ford Henry model.

Seeing Bond in light brown again makes us recall Roger Moore, and this outfit is similar to but more casual and relaxed than any of the brown suits or tan sports coats that Moore wears in his Bond films. Let us not forget the tan suit that Timothy Dalton wears in The Living Daylights, also worn in Morocco like this brown outfit in Spectre. Dalton dresses his suit down by forgoing the tie, but even though Craig wears a tie with this outfit it still has the same casual demeanour. Like on Moore, the light brown jacket is flattering to Daniel Craig’s complexion.

The Spectre Trailer: Tom Ford Suits and Coats

A longer Spectre trailer was released yesterday and revealed official footage of many of the suits and coats that James Bond wears in the film. Spectre has the most varied selection of tailored clothing of the Bond series we’ve seen since Roger Moore was Bond. The clothes it features are designed by both the film’s costume designer Jany Temime and by Tom Ford. Though there are still problems with the fit, the styles of the clothes respect the history of Bond’s exquisite wardrobes over the years. Here is an overview of the tailored clothes in the film.

Blue Prince of Wales Suit with a Blue Windowpane

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This lightweight wool suit is the Tom Ford O’Connor cut, with a few updates from the suits in Skyfall. The O’Connor suit jacket, which is designed by Jany Temime, has three buttons with the narrow lapels rolled to the middle button. It has a single vent, four cuff buttons and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. The jacket is cut with straight shoulders and roped sleeveheads. The trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side-adjusters, a waistband extension with a hook closure and a straight leg with turn-ups. The jacket fits tightly, but it’s not quite as tight as the suit jackets in Skyfall. The sleeves look less constricting. Unfortunately, it’s still too short and doesn’t fully-cover Daniel Craig’s buttocks. The trousers are again too tight and a little too short.

Bond wears his blue Prince of Wales check suit with a white shirt from Tom Ford. The shirt has a point collar and double cuffs. Bond’s tie is solid medium blue and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The shoes are black Crockett & Jones Norwich five-eyelet derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Grey Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Three-Quarter Coat

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This wool, silk and mohair suit is also made in Tom Ford’s O’Connor cut, detailed exactly the same as the blue Prince of Wales check suit. This suit is worn with two different shirts and ties. The first (below) is a white Tom Ford shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. The tie is solid medium grey and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The second shirt (above) is sky blue, made in the same style as the white shirt. With this shirt, Bond wears a solid navy tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears black Crockett & Jones Norwich derby shoes with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over this suit, Bond wears a navy cashmere and silk herringbone three-quarter topcoat with a three buttons hidden under a fly front, a moleskin collar, flapped pockets, a rear vent and three cuff buttons. This kind of coat is often known as the “Crombie” coat, named for the brand who made this style popular. It’s like a chesterfield but shorter.

Blue Sharkskin Suit

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Not much is seen of this wool sharkskin suit, but it appears to be the same style as the other O’Connor suits that we see more of. Bond wears it with a solid navy tie and a white shirt with a point collar. It has either double cuffs or cocktail cuffs. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Norwich derby shoes with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

Black Herringbone Three-Piece Suit and Bridge Coat

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The black herringbone wool three-piece suit is different than the other suits in Spectre, made in Tom Ford’s Windsor cut. The Windsor is one of Tom Ford’s most popular designs. The jacket buttons two and has medium-wide peaked lapels and strong, straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with flaps, a ticket pocket, a single vent and five cuff buttons. The Windsor jacket is slightly longer than the O’Connor jacket. The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button and four welt pockets. The trousers are similar to the O’Connor suit’s trousers but have a slightly fuller leg and no turn-ups. With this suit Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford that has a pinned eyelet collar and two-button cocktail cuffs. The tie is black with a subtle texture. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over the suit, Bond wears a knee-length double-breasted bridge coat made in black brushed wool. It has eight buttons on the front with four to button, an ulster collar, slash pockets, a button-on half belt in the back, a rear vent and three cuff buttons.

Ivory Dinner Jacket

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The new Spectre trailer reveals James Bond’s first ivory dinner jacket since A View to a Kill, released 30 years ago. Not much can be seen of this ivory silk and viscose blend faille dinner jacket, but it is made in the Windsor style and has medium-wide peaked lapels. The wide peaked lapels make this dinner jacket most closely resemble Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever. Bond wears a black cummerbund, and most likely black trousers, under the dinner jacket. The white dress shirt is from Tom Ford with a spread collar, double cuffs and a pleated front. The black diamond-point bow tie that Bond previously wears in Dr. No and Quantum of Solace returns. Compared to the bow tie in Quantum of Solace, this bow tie is pointier. Bond also wears a red boutonnière in his lapel, paying homage to Goldfinger. The muted colours of the trailer make the flower look darker and duller than it likely is in reality.

The images here have been partially colour-corrected to look more true to the actual colours of the clothes. The trailer’s colours are often muted and have a very warm cast. After Spectre is released, this blog with have more thorough reviews of all the clothing in the film.