The Spectre Trailer: Tom Ford Suits and Coats

A longer Spectre trailer was released yesterday and revealed official footage of many of the suits and coats that James Bond wears in the film. Spectre has the most varied selection of tailored clothing of the Bond series we’ve seen since Roger Moore was Bond. The clothes it features are designed by both the film’s costume designer Jany Temime and by Tom Ford. Though there are still problems with the fit, the styles of the clothes respect the history of Bond’s exquisite wardrobes over the years. Here is an overview of the tailored clothes in the film.

Blue Prince of Wales Suit with a Blue Windowpane

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This lightweight wool suit is the Tom Ford O’Connor cut, with a few updates from the suits in Skyfall. The O’Connor suit jacket, which is designed by Jany Temime, has three buttons with the narrow lapels rolled to the middle button. It has a single vent, four cuff buttons and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. The jacket is cut with straight shoulders and roped sleeveheads. The trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side-adjusters, a waistband extension with a hook closure and a straight leg with turn-ups. The jacket fits tightly, but it’s not quite as tight as the suit jackets in Skyfall. The sleeves look less constricting. Unfortunately, it’s still too short and doesn’t fully-cover Daniel Craig’s buttocks. The trousers are again too tight and a little too short.

Bond wears his blue Prince of Wales check suit with a white shirt from Tom Ford. The shirt has a point collar and double cuffs. Bond’s tie is solid medium blue and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The shoes are black Crockett & Jones Norwich five-eyelet derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Grey Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Three-Quarter Coat

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This wool, silk and mohair suit is also made in Tom Ford’s O’Connor cut, detailed exactly the same as the blue Prince of Wales check suit. This suit is worn with two different shirts and ties. The first (below) is a white Tom Ford shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. The tie is solid medium grey and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The second shirt (above) is sky blue, made in the same style as the white shirt. With this shirt, Bond wears a solid navy tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears black Crockett & Jones Norwich derby shoes with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over this suit, Bond wears a navy cashmere and silk herringbone three-quarter topcoat with a three buttons hidden under a fly front, a moleskin collar, flapped pockets, a rear vent and three cuff buttons. This kind of coat is often known as the “Crombie” coat, named for the brand who made this style popular. It’s like a chesterfield but shorter.

Blue Sharkskin Suit

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Not much is seen of this wool sharkskin suit, but it appears to be the same style as the other O’Connor suits that we see more of. Bond wears it with a solid navy tie and a white shirt with a point collar. It has either double cuffs or cocktail cuffs. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

Black Herringbone Three-Piece Suit and Greatcoat

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The black herringbone wool three-piece suit is different than the other suits in Spectre, made in Tom Ford’s Windsor cut. The Windsor is one of Tom Ford’s most popular designs. The jacket buttons two and has medium-wide peaked lapels and pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with flaps, a ticket pocket, a single vent and five cuff buttons. The Windsor jacket is slightly longer than the O’Connor jacket. The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button and four welt pockets. The trousers are similar to the O’Connor suit’s trousers but have a slightly fuller leg and no turn-ups. With this suit Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford that has a pinned eyelet collar and single-button cocktail cuffs. The tie is black with a subtle texture. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over the suit, Bond wears a knee-length double-breasted greatcoat made in black brushed wool. It has eight buttons on the front with four to button, an ulster collar, slash pockets, a button-on half belt in the back, a rear vent and three cuff buttons.

Ivory Dinner Jacket

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The new Spectre trailer reveals James Bond’s first ivory dinner jacket since A View to a Kill, released 30 years ago. Not much can be seen of this ivory silk and viscose blend faille dinner jacket, but it is made in the Windsor style and has medium-wide peaked lapels. The wide peaked lapels make this dinner jacket most closely resemble Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever. Bond wears a black cummerbund, and most likely black trousers, under the dinner jacket. The white dress shirt is from Tom Ford with a spread collar, double cuffs and a pleated front. The black diamond-point bow tie that Bond previously wears in Dr. No and Quantum of Solace returns. Compared to the bow tie in Quantum of Solace, this bow tie is pointier. Bond also wears a red boutonnière in his lapel, paying homage to Goldfinger. The muted colours of the trailer make the flower look darker and duller than it likely is in reality.

The images here have been partially colour-corrected to look more true to the actual colours of the clothes. The trailer’s colours are often muted and have a very warm cast. After Spectre is released, this blog with have more thorough reviews of all the clothing in the film.

More Spectre Filming in London

Spectre London Tom Ford Suit

Spectre has been filming in London as of late, and James Bond is appropriately dressed for the city in a grey pinstripe suit and “Crombie” coat. There are many photos at Daily Mail. The Tom Ford suit is a combination of styles from Quantum of Solace and Skyfall, but it’s also something new. The suit is dark grey with narrow-spaced white pinstripes, which makes the suit look medium grey overall.

The suit jacket goes back to the Quantum of Solace buttoning arrangement of three buttons with the lapels rolled to the middle button. The lapels are narrow, but not overly so. The shoulders are straight with a little padding, the chest is clean and the waist is very suppressed, with only a little pulling at the button. The fit is much cleaner than the fit in Skyfall. The jacket has a single vent and slightly slanted pockets. All of each cuff’s four buttons are fastened, something unusual—but an improvement—for Craig’s Bond’s who usually leaves the last button open on his Tom Ford suits. The last buttonhole is longer than the rest, as usual for Tom Ford’s suits.

The biggest problem with the suit jacket is its length. Like the suit jackets in Skyfall, it’s about an inch too short—or perhaps two inches too short if you want a traditional English length. The too-short jacket emphasises his hips more and takes away from his masculine physique. In addition to being fashionable, the shorter length may be done to make Craig look taller. Overall, the fit is a huge improvement over the suits in Skyfall, and costumer designer Jany Temime has corrected some of the mistakes she made in her first Bond film.

The trousers have a flat front with side adjusters and turn-ups. Turn-ups with flat front trousers has a long tradition in America, and now with Bond since he has been wearing non-pleated suit trousers with turn-ups since The World Is Not Enough. The legs are narrow, but they have enough room to allow Bond to move around without constraint. The rise looks extremely low, but the trousers also appear to be sagging. Even with the sagging, the rise is still lower than it should be to ensure that no shirt and tie show beneath the jacket’s fastened button. They don’t look particularly comfortable around the fork.

The white shirt has a point collar—which is rather un-British—and double cuffs. The tie is grey and may be solid or have a discreet pattern. The tie is tied in a four-in-hand knot with a well-formed dimple. Bond’s shoes are are black five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes on a chiselled last with Dainite studded rubber soles, and most likely the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. Bond also wears Tom Ford sunglasses in some photos.

Spectre London Tom Ford Crombie Coat

The navy “Crombie coat” is made by Tom Ford in Crombie’s famous style. The “Crombie coat” is essentially a three-quarter length chesterfield, and most classically in navy. Crombie has long been so well known for making this type of topcoat that the style is universally known by the brand name. Tom Ford only sets this coat apart from Crombie’s models with his curved “barchetta” breast pocket.

The topcoat is fitted with straight shoulders, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The front is darted. In following the classic Crombie style, Bond’s Tom Ford topcoat has a navy velvet collar, a fly front with three large hidden buttons, straight pockets with flaps, a single vent and three buttons on the cuffs. Bond only fastens the middle button, which detracts from the elegance of the fly front because the top and bottom buttons are visible. And if the purpose of wearing a topcoat is to stay warm, why only fasten one button? It looks too tight to have the top button fastened anyway, which makes this a poorly fitted coat. The sleeves are also too short. The sleeves on an outercoat should be long enough to cover the shirt sleeves but not get in the way of the hands. Sleeves should be longer for the most warmth. The navy three-quarter coat with a velvet collar recalls Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield in Live and Let Die. It’s just one of a few elements of Bond’s wardrobe in Spectre that has similarities to the clothes in Live and Let Die.

Another Suit from Spectre Revealed

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Daily Mail has once again posted images from the filming of Spectre. This time Daniel Craig is wearing a light navy Tom Ford suit with a light windowpane over a glen check. The style and fit of the suit is, quite unfortunately, practically identical to the suits in Skyfall. Clearly it’s not a suit meant for moving around in!

The suit jacket looks like it has two buttons, but it may have three like in Skyfall. It also has straight shoulders, narrow notched lapels, a single vent, four buttons on the cuffs—with the last button left open—and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. As for the fit, the jacket length is again too short to cover his buttocks and it is too small all around. A suit should not be so binding, no matter how much one moves around. No matter how tight a suit is it doesn’t show off Daniel Craig’s muscular physique. Tight knitted garments, like the mock polo neck jumper, conform to the body and move with the body because they can stretch, whilst tight woven garments, especially tailored garments with a lot of internal structure, are unable to stretch. Suits can mould to the body, but they still have to fit well first, and they need a little allowance in areas for movement. The suit may be too tight because Daniel Craig is wearing a safety harness under it, but the costume designer Jany Temime should have accounted for that, just as she ordered a suit with longer sleeves for riding a motorbike in Skyfall. One things this suit from Spectre improves on over the Skyfall suits are wider shoulders, so at least Daniel Craig looks more powerful in this suit. The flat-front suit trousers are again a little too tight, and they aren’t staying up as high as they are supposed to sit on the waist. When the trousers sag, it causes the front to look messy and show below the fastened jacket button. The trousers have an extended waistband with side adjusters, and the legs are finished with turn-ups.

The white shirt is certainly an improvement over the Skyfall shirts since the tab collar is replaced with a point collar. Still, one would expect at least a semi-spread for such an English hero. The shirt also has double cuffs, which don’t quite fit inside the suit jacket’s narrow sleeves. One area that this shirt is not improved over the Skyfall shirts is the colour. Light blue flatters Daniel Craig’s light complexion more than white does, which washes him out a little. The tie is navy (possibly with a pattern that can’t be seen), and the navy tie with a navy suit is one of the most classic Bond combinations, though it is most often done with a blue shirt. It is tied in a four-in-hand knot. Since the knot is so narrow, the tie likely has a very light interlining. Craig also wears a folded white linen handkerchief in his breast pocket. The shoes are probably the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. They are black five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles. His socks are a rather boring and unstylish black. Navy would have been a better choice, since it would extend the line of possibly-too-short trouser legs.

See more photos and read about the filming at Daily Mail.

Spectre Teaser Poster: A Charcoal Mock Polo Neck

Spectre Teaser Poster

The teaser poster for Spectre was released yesterday, and it features Daniel Craig wearing a charcoal grey mock polo neck—also known as the mock turtleneck or mock roll-neck—jumper and charcoal grey checked trousers. The outfit with the visible shoulder holster immediately recalls Roger Moore’s black polo neck outfit in Live and Let Die. That outfit, in turn, was inspired by Steve McQueen’s very similar outfit in Bullitt, which was made five years before Live and Let Die. Whilst Moore’s and McQueen’s jumpers have true polo necks that are folded over, Daniel Craig’s jumper has a mock polo neck that has both ends of the collar sewn down to the neckline. It’s also shorter than a true polo neck. Daniel Craig’s jumper is also charcoal instead of black like Moore’s is, which is a more flattering choice to his light complexion. The finely-knitted wool jumper snugly hugs Daniel Craig’s body, and it has fine-ribbed cuffs and hem. It is 70% cashmere and 30% silk, and it is made by N.Peal.

The choice to bring back the polo neck may be due to Spectre director Sam Mendes’ fond memories of seeing his first James Bond film Live and Let Die. It may also be due to the popularity of the animated spy television show Archer, in which the title character popularised the black polo neck he originally saw tactical potential in and calls it the “tactleneck”. By going with charcoal grey instead of black, James Bond makes this mock polo neck his own. Grey is actually a little better for hiding in the dark than true black is. The grey mock polo neck recalls the lighter grey one that Sean Connery wears in You Only Live Twice.

The trousers are black with a tiny white or light grey tick pattern, giving them a charcoal look overall. The ends of the frogmouth pockets can be seen peaking out from under the jumper. The Tom Ford Autumn/Winter 2015 collection features many trousers with frogmouth pockets, so these could certainly be from it.

Young Q in a Fishtail Parka

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For James Bond’s introduction to the new Q (played by Ben Whishaw) in Skyfall, costume designer Jany Temime dressed Q in a fishtail parka. Compared to James Bond in a topcoat and suit, Q’s parka over a sports coat makes him look less serious, less professional and less mature than Bond, which he would later unfortunately prove the same with his methods. The casual way Q is dressed certainly doesn’t help him earn Bond’s trust. The fishtail parka was originally made for the United States Army in the 1950s with a split and cords at the rear that so each side of the coat could be tied around the legs to keep out the elements. The fishtail parka soon became popular with Mods in the UK, and that connexion makes it fit well with the young Q’s hipster style.

According to Bond Lifestyle, Q’s coffee-brown fishtail parka is from Pretty Green. It has a zip-fastening covered with a fly that secures with press studs. The cuffs also adjust with press studs. On the front of the coat there are steeply slanted pockets with flaps. The waist cinches with a drawstring, which is visible as a ridge around the back of the coat and exits through a hole in either side on the front of the coat. The coat is long enough to reach the upper thighs. The coat also has a hood that cinches with a drawstring. The original coat came with fur trim on the collar that was removed.

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Under the fishtail parka, Q wears a black cotton moleskin jacket from Maison Margiela (according to Jany Temime) in a fashionable button two cut. The jacket has a shorter length, slightly narrow lapels and a very high gorge, which is the seam that connects the collar to the lapels. The lapels have very conspicuous prick stitching, which some makers use to give a false sense of quality. At one time only the best makers used prick stitching, which should be done by hand as subtly as possible. It serves to keep the lapels flat and isn’t meant to be a visual element. Q’s jacket has very bold prick stitching, which is most likely done by machine.

Q’s narrow tie is black with purple tick marks. Spaces between the tick marks create black lines in a herringbone tile pattern. Q’s shirt and trousers are same as what he wears later in the film with his Dries Van Noten cardigan. The shirt from Reiss is pale pink with light grey pencil stripes and has a spread collar and double cuffs. The trousers from Hentsch Man are a check with navy and plum.

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A First Look at Spectre’s Suits

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Daily Mail has given us a good look at what Daniel Craig is wearing in Spectre. For those who want to read about the suit without spoilers, my write-up of this new suit is free of context. There are many more photos posted at imgur (where the photo above is from), but no more photos will follow in this article.

Daniel Craig’s first suit from Spectre that we get to see is a three-piece black herringbone made by Tom Ford. This black has a blue cast, so unlike ordinary blacks it doesn’t look brown or green. It’s likely a mohair blend due to the suit’s strong sheen. It’s made in Ford’s well-known style: a button two jacket with wide peaked lapels and strong pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The shoulders are similar to the Quantum of Solace suits’ shoulders. The dramatic silhouette is inspired by British designer/Savile Row tailor Tommy Nutter’s designs that his former tailors Edward SextonRoy Chittleborough and Joe Morgan still make today. I recommend checking out their work at the links above. Though Spectre is the third Bond film to feature Tom Ford’s suits, this is the first time Bond is wearing Ford’s signature style full-on. Craig’s suit jacket is still too tight and too short like the Skyfall suits, but it’s not as short and not quite as tight. Also, the jacket’s larger shoulders combined with a not-as-short length make Craig’s Bond look like the commanding man he should be. This is where Spectre‘s suits have greatly succeeded over Skyfall‘s. The narrow shoulders and shrunken cut of the Skyfall suits manage to make the muscular Daniel Craig look rather wimpy. The Skyfall suits look like they are a full chest size and length too small whereas this suit from Spectre looks only just a little too tight.

The suit jacket has wide pocket flaps with a ticket pocket, a single vent and five-button cuffs with the last button left open. The jacket’s lapels—being both very wide and peaked—make this suit rather flashy for a secret agent. Peaked lapels on a single-breasted jacket were popular in the 1930s and 40s and are popular again now, but they are not a conservative choice. James Bond previously wears peaked lapels on single-breasted suit jackets in Diamonds Are Forever and Casino Royale. The single vent—like in Skyfall—isn’t particularly British for a dressy worsted suit, but there’s technically nothing wrong with it. Sean Connery’s Bond wears single-vented suits fairly often. This is the style of suit jacket Tom Ford favours on himself, so he may have had more personal input this time around. Roger Moore even wears a suit in a very similar style in his film Street People.

The suit’s waistcoat has six buttons with the bottom button left open. Like the jacket, it looks a little too tight, but Craig doesn’t look like he is going to burst the buttons off it like the Hulk. The trousers have a flat front, somewhat low rise, slide-buckle side adjusters, narrow tapered legs—which are, again, just a little too snug—and plain hems. Yes, that’s right, Bond does not wear turn-ups (cuffs) this time. Only once or twice over the past twenty years has Bond worn suit trousers without turn-ups. The trousers have slipped down, revealing the shirt below the waistcoat. Braces would have helped the shirt to not show, and since Bond is wearing a waistcoat they would be completely hidden.

Daniel Craig not only wears Tom Ford’s preferred suit style but also Ford’s preferred shirt collar. Craig’s white shirt has a point collar with eyelets for a collar pin to stick through it. The silver collar pin is the kind with balls on the end that unscrew to slide through the holes in the collar. It’s the cleanest-looking type of collar pin, but it’s the most affected kind of collar pin as well. Ford himself prefers a collar without eyelets and a gold safety pin that sticks through the collar. Nevertheless, any collar pin is too fussy for the literary Bond’s simple tastes, and it’s a step beyond Skyfall’s tab collars. Pierce Brosnan was a big fan of the collar pin in Remington Steele since it was a popular style in the 1980s. One thing this shirt might actually get right is the cuff style. Click on the image at the top to enlarge and you might see a cocktail cuff! James Bond has not worn cocktail cuffs since Moonraker (not counting Never Say Never Again), but unless my eyes are deceiving me, it looks like he is wearing cocktail cuffs again. A win for the cocktail cuff fans! Costume designer Jany Temime deserves credit for this brilliant homage to the early Bond films. For those who aren’t fans of the cocktail cuffs they add yet another level of flashiness to the outfit.

Craig’s tie is a black-on-black pattern and tied in a windsor knot, another uncharacteristic style for Bond, but it certainly wouldn’t be Bond’s first windsor knot. The white pocket square with a black border is stuffed in the pocket, though it’s not stuffed in deep enough. It looks like he’s trying to hard to show it off, whereas just a little of it showing from behind the wide peaked lapels would have been more effective.

The black double-monk ankle boots are the Crockett & Jones Camberley. They have a cap toe and Dainite studded rubber sole. Monk boots are not to be confused with Jodhpur boots; monk boots have the quarters over the vamp whilst jodhpur boots have the vamp over the quaters. Though atypical, the boots are actually very Bond-like, recalling a mix of Sean Connery’s and Pierce Brosnan’s Bonds’ footwear. Connery wears black ankle boots with some of his suits in Goldfinger and Thunderball. Pierce Brosnan wears black monk shoes with some of his suits in The World Is Not Enough. The closest shoes to these previously worn by Bond are Sean Connery’s brown monk boots in Diamonds Are Forever that he wears with his light grey suitcream suit and brown checked sports coat. Boots work well with the narrow suit trousers since narrow trousers cover less and are more likely to show sock with regular shoes. Monk boots also respect the literary Bond, who “abhorred shoe-laces,” as Ian Fleming wrote in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. On the other hand, these monk boots are amongst Bond’s flashiest footwear. They might be even flashier than Roger Moore’s Gucci and Ferragamo horse-bit slip-ons!

Over the suit Daniel Craig wears a black greatcoat-inspired topcoat that has many similarities to the greatcoat he wears in Quantum of Solace. It is probably made by Tom Ford. The double-breasted coat is knee-length and has eight buttons on the front with four to button. The coat also has an ulster collar, meaning the coat has revers than can fold over button up at the neck. The ulster collar is more practical but less dressy than peaked lapels. The back of the coat has a half belt with buttons. The style of coat recalls James Bond’s military origins. Craig only buttons the coat’s second button from the top, which causes the rather lightweight topcoat to fall out of shape and rumple a bit. On top of that, the coat is a little too tight around the waist. It’s difficult to tell if the fit, the belt’s setting or the way Craig buttons the coat is the main cause of the rumpling. Both with and without the topcoat, Craig wears black perforated leather gloves that have a strap on top of the wrist. They go well with the black topcoat, but without the topcoat they look villainous. Craig wears sunglasses again in Spectre, and they’re probably made by Tom Ford.

Overall this first clear look of the style in Spectre is very interesting, and costume designer Jany Temime has done a better job with this suit in her second Bond film than she did with any of the suits in Skyfall. Though we see a fit problem again, it’s not as bad as it was in Skyfall. The clothing styles respect James Bond tradition in some areas—like the colours of the clothes, the cocktail cuffs, the boots (in some ways) and the topcoat—and ignore it in others—like the peaked lapels, the boots (in other ways) and the collar pin. The clothes are certainly too flashy for Bond, but at the same time they are very stylish and interesting.

Announcing Spectre—Daniel Craig in a Blue Jumper

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At a press conference yesterday morning, Bond 24 was christened Spectre, and Skyfall’s costume designer Jany Temime was confirmed to be returning. So what did Daniel Craig wear to this press conference? He dressed down elegantly in a jumper, grey wool trousers and a shirt and tie. Thanks to James Bond Lifestyle, the round-neck jumper is identified as the “Oxford” model from N.Peal, the same one that he wears in Skyfall. But it’s in a different colour: a deep royal blue that flatters Daniel Craig’s warm spring complexion. Under the jumper, Craig wore a white shirt with a narrow collar—presumably a point collar but it could possibly be a tab collar—and a navy tie. V-neck jumpers typically work better with a tie than round-neck jumpers do since the V-neck leaves a space for the tie. The round neck jumper awkwardly sits over the tie knot. On the other hand, a crew-neck jumper over a tie looks like something one would wear when removing a jacket after returning home from work. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing; it shows an unstudied elegance. Craig allowed shirt cuff to show beyond the jumper’s sleeves.

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Craig wore grey wool flat-front trousers with turn-ups and Crockett & Jones Molton chukka boots (again, identified by James Bond Lifestyle) with the jumper. The Molton is a three-eyelet chukka with rubber soles sold at Barneys New York. Craig’s boots were black suede, an unusual combination of colour and material. Black is the dressiest colour for footwear whilst suede is a rather informal material. Black looks good when it’s well-shined leather, and in suede it looses that characteristic whilst lacking the interest that the brown colour can give suede. Black suede looks very dull and flat. However, the black goes with the grey and blue in the outfit whilst suede chukka boots match the casual look of outfit. Black suede is very difficult to pull off due to its unorthodox nature, yet Craig makes it work.

Daniel Craig’s outfit certainly looked elegant, but was it appropriate for a grand announcement of a new Bond film? Does it give insight to what he will wear in Spectre? Perhaps not. Craig wore a suit and tie at the press conferences announcing his first three Bond films, though only at the Quantum of Solace press conference did Craig wear an outfit from the upcoming film (the charcoal suit he wears in the London scenes). The Spectre press conference certainly looks like a more spontaneous affair than the previous press conferences, not only in the way Daniel Craig is dressed but also in the way the other actors are dressed. Nobody appears to be wearing costume.

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Ralph Fiennes, who plays M in Spectre, wore a beautiful charcoal birdseye suit with an azure blue shirt. The suit jacket is a button two with jetted pockets and no vents, and the trousers have forward pleats and turn-ups and are held up with braces that button on the outside of the waistband. However, Fiennes made the mistake of fastening the bottom button of the jacket instead of the top. The suit jacket has a fairly soft construction for what is most likely a bespoke English suit, judging by the full chest, natural shoulders and roped sleeveheads, and the lapel had rolled over the top button down to the bottom button. This was most likely the result of a poor pressing because no English tailor would design a suit to button so low as to show the trouser waistband above the jacket’s button. Fiennes’ wore shoes with plain toe and were likely chelsea boots, though they were mostly hidden by the trousers. Fiennes’ suit is also not one that should be worn without a tie. That suit and the occasion warranted a tie.

Spectre‘s Director Sam Mendes wore a sloppy-looking suit with both the sleeves and the trousers too long. It was as if he borrowed a suit for the event. The jacket has three buttons and he fastened the bottom two buttons.

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Ben Whishaw, who plays Q in Spectre, wore one of the least attractive outfits of the men at the event. He wore a black, button four unstructured jacket, baggy black trousers that bunch at the waist, black derby shoes and white shirt with the collar buttoned but no tie. He was probably inspired by the Twelfth Doctor to button his collar without a tie, but it is nevertheless an unattractive look. Rory Kinnear, who plays Tanner, dressed similarly to Daniel Craig in a jumper, though his outfit isn’t quite as refined.

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Christoph Waltz, who plays Franz Oberhauser, was perhaps the best-dressed man at the Spectre press conference in a outfit of a well-fitting suit and tie that’s appropriate for the grand occasion. The suit is a tone-on-tone brown Glen Urquhart check and has a button two jacket with flapped pockets and a single vent with flat front and plain-hemmed trousers. He unfortunately had the right pocket flap tucked whilst he left pocket flap out. He wore it with a white shirt that had an edge-stitched point collar and a burgundy tie with a brown grid and white dots. He knotted the tie in a windsor knot. His shoes are light brown cap-toe oxfords, a flashy and fashionable, yet stylish, choice.

Silva: Cream Jacket and Printed Shirt

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Raoul Silva, played by Javier Bardem in Skyfall, is one of the most flamboyantly-dressed villains, yet he’s a well-tailored one. His cream silk jacket fits almost perfectly, the only problem being that the sleeve are too long. It’s made by Mayfair tailor Thom Sweeney, so it’s nice to see a second character in Skyfall—the first being Gareth Mallory—wearing bespoke English tailoring. The button two silk jacket is elegantly-tailored in the English style with softly-padded shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The jacket is tailored with classic proportions; the lapels are a balanced width, the length covers his behind and the jacket is closely fitted but not tight. The jacket has slanted hip pockets, double vents, four buttons on the cuffs, and dark brown corozo nut buttons.

Silva-Cream-Jacket-2Under the jacket, Silva wears a waistcoat and trousers in dark olive tropical wool or mohair. The waistcoat has five buttons, and Silva unstylishly fastens the bottom button. However, if he left the waistcoat’s bottom button open the shirt underneath may be exposed since the trousers have a somewhat low rise. The trousers’ waistband is visible in the notch of the bottom of the waistcoat. The waistcoat has narrow lapels and a small, full collar that are worn flipped up. The trousers have a flat front and plain hem.

Silva-Cream-Jacket-3Silva’s shirt from Prada is the flashiest part of his outfit. The shirt’s printed pattern consists of tan tiles with a white border and navy tiles with a tan border on a black ground. The shirt has a point collar, rounded single-button cuffs and dark buttons. Silva wears the collar button and first button open. Because of how flashy the shirt is, the necktie isn’t missed. It can be awkward to wear a waistcoat without a tie, but the waistcoat’s purpose here is to tone down the outfit by covering the shirt rather than to dress up the outfit. By flipping up the waistcoat’s collar and lapels, Silva rejects the additional formality that the waistcoat would ordinarily give the outfit. This is not a way I would recommend anyone wear a waistcoat, but when you’re a Bond villain you can dress as you please.

Silva’s medium brown chelsea boots add an additional level of flamboyance to his outfit. Though chelsea boots are typically very clean and sleek, Silva’s chelsea boots have an excessive amount of brogueing and far more seams than typical chelsea boots. They have a toe cap as well as a decorative strip of leather across the vamp. Apart from brogueing on every seam, they also have a toe medallion. The boots have thick double leather soles.

Costume designer Jany Temime dressed Silva appropriately in a garish and outrageous manner that perfectly suits the insane Bond villain.

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