Never Say Never Again: Bond Borrows a Striped Bathrobe

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When Bond arrives aboard Largo’s yacht the Flying Saucer in Never Say Never Again, he’s wearing a wet suit. He removes the wetsuit immediately and when he climbs on deck he’s only wearing a pair of tight, mid-thigh-length navy swimming trunks with red and white stripes. Largo’s butler greets Bond and gives him a bathrobe and matching towel to wear over his shoulders to dry off.

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Bond’s briefly seen swimming trunks

Bond’s striped bathrobe in Spectre makes the striped bathrobe from Never Say Never Again relevant again, though the colour schemes are vastly different. The bathrobe Largo provides Bond has a bold pattern of wide and narrow yellow, navy and periwinkle stripes. There are also narrow sections of white and coloured pin stripes in each of the three respective colours. The bathrobe is made from a very absorbent waffle cotton or microfibre.

The calf-length robe cinches around the waist with a belt. There are two open patch pockets at the sides below the belt. The chest has a black patch with a gold insignia.

Close-up of the waffle fabric

Close-up of the waffle fabric

Like many of the bathrobes and dressing gowns that Bond wears, this one is not Bond’s own and not something to judge his taste by. The pastel colours were very popular in the 1980s, and his polo later in the film follows the same colour scheme. The shared colours between the bathrobe and polo may signify that Bond also got the polo from Largo. However, the shirt and trousers that Bond wears aboard the Flying Saucer inexplicably match his own since he brought no clothes with him.

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A Blue Bathrobe, Courtesy of Dr. No

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James Bond wears many bathrobes and dressing gowns throughout the series, and they all started in Dr. No with the bathrobe Bond given after his decontamination shower by Dr. No’s men. The bathrobes and dressing gowns that Bond wears are rarely his own. Bond’s calf-length bathrobe is made of sky blue cotton terrycloth and it is made like any ordinary bathrobe with a shawl collar, turned-back cuffs a patch pocket on the left side of the chest and two patch pockets on the hips. A belt ties around the waist. Bond’s sandals are also provided by Dr. No’s men and are made of woven rope in the natural tan colour of the fibre they are made of. Though slippers are the ordinary footwear to wear with a bathrobe, sandals fit the island location.

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Honey is holding Bond’s sandals, with hers inside

A Blue Striped Dressing Gown of Shirting

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Roger Moore may be known for his wide lapels, flared trousers and safari suits, but he also loved his dressing gowns and bathrobes. The dressing gown he wears in Octopussy in India is perfect for the hot weather. It’s made of cotton poplin shirting (the cloth a shirt is made from), which is lightweight, breathes well and feels great against the skin. Additionally, it takes up little space in baggage, so this is one of the few dressing gowns we see in the Bond series that most likely belongs to James Bond, as opposed to a hotel or villain hosting Bond. It’s one of James Bond’s most elegant dressing gowns, and it likely came from an English shirtmaker, though it probably isn’t bespoke. Many of the Jermyn Street shirtmakers make similar dressing gowns from their shirtings.

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Bond’s dressing gown is sky blue with red, grey and white stripes. The red and grey stripes are bordered by thin white stripes, whilst the white stripes are bordered by thin grey stripes. The gown has a shawl collar, turnback cuffs, one breast patch pocket on the left and hip patch pockets on either side. The waist secures with a wide belt. The collar, cuffs, pockets and belt are finished with royal blue piping for a luxurious look. The gown is calf-length.

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Yukata at Tanaka’s Home

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Of all the cultures James Bond visits, he outwardly shows the most appreciation for Japanese culture in You Only Live Twice. He follows many of the Japanese’s customs even before he “becomes” Japanese. As a guest at Tiger Tanaka’s home, Bond wears a yukata and slippers. The yukata is a casual kimono made of cotton, and the name “yukata” means bathing clothes. Bond does indeed wear a yukata at the baths at Tanaka’s home.

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Bond’s yukata is a printed pattern of grey on white that resembles trees and water. It has a shawl collar and the front parts overlap left side over right side across the body. The yukata is held closed around the waist with a black sash called an obi, and it’s tied in back. The yukata’s length reaches the ankles, and the wide sleeves end at the middle of the forearm. Tiger Tanaka’s yukata has all of the characteristics of Bond’s yukata, but his has a light grey ground with closely-spaced indigo lengthwise stripes and wavy black crosswise stripes that create a scale-like pattern. Bond wears dark brown slippers, and Tanaka wears cream slippers.

Since I know little about Japanese garments and have never worn them, I found most of my information on the yukaka Wikipedia entry. If anyone knows more about these Japanese garments, feel free to comment below.

Navy Silk Dressing Gown

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James Bond briefly wears a navy silk dressing gown in Thunderball that he likely found in his large, luxurious room at the Shrublands health clinic. It has a shawl collar, turnback cuffs and a belt around the waist. The dressing gown is clearly sized for the average shorter man, since the sleeves end at the middle of Sean Connery’s forearm, and the length reaches the middle of his thighs. At 6’2″, Connery needs a longer dressing gown than what most men need. Though it’s too short, the gown’s shoulders are also much too large. Dressing gowns are often made as one size to fit all, but they don’t always have to fit poorly. Compare this dressing gown to the much better-fitting example in Goldfinger.

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Bond in a Women’s Bathrobe

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Like most of Bond’s bathrobes and dressing gowns, the bathrobe Bond wears in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service is not his own. In fact, it’s not even a men’s bathrobe. Tracy (Diana Rigg) wears the bathrobe after she breaks into Bond’s hotel suite, and she leaves the bathrobe behind when she disappears from Bond’s balcony in the middle of the night. Since her dress is on the bed when we first see her in the bathrobe, Tracy probably found the bathrobe in Bond’s hotel suite closet. The bathrobe is likely provided by the hotel in every suite’s closet.

Tracy-BathrobeBond puts on the bathrobe when he wakes up and finds it laying next to him in bed. The robe’s short length is what gives it away a women’s bathrobe, and when Bond sits in the bathrobe it just barely covers the parts that it needs to. On Tracy, the bottom of the bathrobe hits at her upper thigh. Diana Rigg 5’9″ tall, and the short bathrobe plays up the sex appeal of her long legs. Bond, however, is 6’2″ tall and for obvious reasons needs a longer bathrobe. The brief shot of Lazenby just barely wearing the bathrobe that is too short for him may have been for the same reasons Diana Rigg wears it. After all, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service features a new younger and fitter Bond.

Bond-Womens-Bathrobe-2The terrycloth bathrobe is white with a windowpane of double navy lines. The lines are thicker in the vertical than in the horizontal, which is an attempt to make the pattern more slimming by emphasising the vertical lines. There are two sets of three navy stripes follows by a single navy stripe around the shawl collar and the ends of the sleeves. The sleeves are worn folded up. A belt ties around the waist.

This may be the only piece of women’s clothing I ever cover on this blog, unless Bond again wears women’s clothing. It’s a shame we don’t get to see Bond wearing the gold silk pyjama suit with blue piping laid out on his bed.

Columbo’s Bathrobe

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“It was a very amusing performance between you and the owner of this,” says Bond, referring to Countess Lisl von Schlaf (played by Pierce Brosnan’s wife Cassandra Harris) and Milos Columbo (played by Topol), respectively. And “this” is the red and black striped bathrobe that Bond is wearing whilst spending the night at Columbo’s beach home. Bond often borrows bathrobes and dressing gowns wherever he sleeps, since it’s not the kind of garment most people travel with. However, Bond didn’t come to Columbo’s home prepared with a change of clothes either. The red in the bathrobe brings out the best in Roger Moore’s spring complexion, and the colour was likely chosen by the costume designer to look better on Moore than on Topol, who has a cool, olive complexion. The bathrobe is made of a smooth velour that is very comfortable for lounging in, though it’s not the most absorbent as a bathrobe. The robe also has traditional details like a shawl collar and turn back cuffs.

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Two Bathrobes

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In For Your Eyes Only, Bond wears two bathrobes aboard the research vessel Triana. After being painfully pulled through the water in his t-shirt and cotton trousers, Bond dons the most comfortable thing he can: a terrycloth bathrobe. Bond has worn terrycloth bathrobes starting in Dr. No, but they are likely never his own. This one his most likely found in a closet on the ship. The prussian blue terrycloth has a pile of very long, absorbent loops that dry him and keep him warm. It’s not luxurious but it serves its purpose. The robe has raglan sleeves and a shawl collar, and there are three stripes of the cloth missing the pile around the collar. Though we don’t see much of this bathrobe, it most certainly has a belt around the waist, and it probably has patch pockets under the belt.

White-Velour-BathrobeThe second robe is a more lavish white velour, the kind you might find in the closet at a luxury hotel. Velour is knitted and has a fine cut pile, which is very soft but not so absorbent. Some are lined in terrycloth to be a more absorbent bathrobe, but if not it’s great for lounging around. Like a more classic dressing gown it has a shawl collar, a belted waist, a patch breast pocket, two patch pockets below the belt and set-in sleeves with turnback cuffs. Like the blue bathrobe, this robe is most likely not Bond’s own and probably belonged to Sir Timothy Havelock, the owner of the Triana.

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