A Suede Jacket and Mock Polo Neck for Spectre’s Climax

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During Spectre’s climax in London, James Bond wears a “marine” navy “Racer Jacket” from John Varvatos. The jacket is made of goat suede and has a two-way zip-front that can open from both the top and the bottom. The sleeves have a zip gauntlet to allow the hand to fit through the narrow sleeves. The front and back are each made of two pieces, and the front has darts at the sides for a trimmer fit. There are side-access pockets at the base of each front dart. The jacket is fully lined.

Under the jacket Bond wears a dark charcoal grey fine gauge mock turtleneck from British company N.Peal made of a blend of 70% cashmere and 30% silk. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. This jumper has a close fit that shows off Daniel Craig’s body much better than a suit does.

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On the teaser poster for Spectre we see the jumper without the jacket, where Bond’s shoulder holster is revealed. This look immediately recalls the 1973 film Live and Let Die, in which Roger Moore wears a black full polo neck with black trousers and shoulder holster. In turn, Roger Moore’s look was inspired by Steve McQueen in Bullitt, and Daniel Craig’s wardrobes also often take much inspiration directly from McQueen. Craig’s updated dark grey version better flatters his fair complexion than Roger Moore’s black polo neck does, though McQueen’s blue polo neck would be a great look on Daniel Craig.

The trousers are from Neil Barrett and have a flat front with frogmouth pockets. The trousers are black with a grey tic pattern of large tics made up of tiny tics in a blend of viscose, nylon, polyester and elastane. The legs are narrow and tapered, but the elastane content makes the narrow legs wearable. Bond wears the trousers with a belt, though because the scenes are so dark it is difficult to tell if the belt is black or brown. Because Bond wears brown boots with the outfit, a brown belt would be the ideal choice, and dark brown wouldn’t break up the outfit too much.

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Speaking of boots, Bond’s are the Sanders & Sanders “Hi-Top” chukka boots, also known as the “Playboy” chukka boots. The boots are snuff suede with a two-eyelet closure, a full leather lining and crepe soles. Crepe soles are associated more with the desert boot, the chukka boot’s brother. Crepe soles are made of coagulated rubber and are very soft and comfortable and fantastic for the desert, but they’re not a good choice for the city. On pavement they absorb all of the filth, and in the rain they become very slippery. The sides of the soles do not look pretty as they wear. And as the soles age they harden, crack and lose their spongy comfort. The “Playboy” chukka boots are something directly inspired by Steve McQueen, which he wears with his polo neck in Bullitt.

Read more about James Bond’s relationship with the turtleneck/polo neck over the years.

Meeting Mr White in a Navy Jacket in Spectre

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When meeting Mr. White in Altaussee, Austria in Spectre, James Bond wears a navy wool and cashmere jacket from Dior Homme. The front of the jacket has five buttons covered with a fly. There is zip to close the fly, which is offset like the zip on a biker jacket. Whilst the biker jacket’s zip is angled, this jacket has a vertical zip that follows the fly. The zipped fly keeps the jacket warmer, though the buttons don’t serve a purpose with the zip. Jackets more open have a buttoned fly that conceals the zip instead. The sleeves to taper to the cuff and follow the shape of the arm, but to allow the hand though the cuffs have a long zip.

The jacket has a turn-down collar which can be flipped up and closed with a throat latch. The collar originally had black fur trim. There are set-in pockets on the front with straight flaps that fasten down on the corners with poppers. The inside the jacket has a black, quilted lining. There are horizontal darts over the shoulder blades to give fullness and neatness in the upper back. Though the jacket doesn’t match any traditional jacket styles, it has a practical design with a timeless look. Though Dior’s clothes mostly focus on the latest fashion trends, this jacket doesn’t suffer from being overly trendy.

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Under the jacket, Bond wears a polo neck—the proper rolled style—from N.Peal. It is in a colour they call “Fumo Grey”, which is a light and warm shade of grey that is very flattering to Craig’s complexion. It is designed for warmth and is cable-knitted in a heavy Mongolian cashmere.

The trousers are from Neil Barrett and have a flat front with frogmouth pockets. The trousers are black with a grey pattern of large tics made up of tiny tics in a blend of viscose, nylon, polyester and elastane. The legs are narrow and tapered, but the elastane content makes the narrow legs wearable. The trousers are worn with a belt.

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Bond wears black Danner Mountain Light II 5″ boots. The boots lace with five pairs of lugs to the toe and two pairs of speed hooks at the top for a secure fit. The boots are made of one piece with leather plus a counter up the back. They have Vibram soles with yellow cleats. Bond’s black leather gloves are the “James” model from Agnelle. The back is quilted and there are gathers on the underside of the wrist. The gloves are lined with 100% alpaca. Matching the jacket, the navy knitted cap—also called a beanie or tuque—is in a ribbed knit wool and is folded up at the bottom.

Shawl-Collared Cardigan with Checked Trousers in Casino Royale

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When chatting with Mathis on the balcony of his hotel suite in Casino Royale, James Bond wears a shawl-collared cardigan over a t-shirt and checked trousers. The outfit is stylish and urbane, yet it’s also young and very relaxed. This cardigan is the second in the film. Bond wears the first cardigan under his pea coat in the film’s opening scene. This second cardigan is black wool with six buttons down the front. The top button is placed in the middle of the shawl collar and is smaller than the other buttons. The bottom two buttons are spaced close together. The cardigan’s ribbed shawl collar continues down the front into a placket. There are two patch pockets on the front. The cuffs, pocket openings and hem are ribbed and elastic. Bond also wears this cardigan in Venice at the end of the film.

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Under the cardigan, Craig wears a charcoal grey crew-neck fitted T-shirt from Sunspel. The dark t-shirt has a more refined look than a lighter grey or white t-shirt would have, but it keeps the outfit looking casual, relaxed and young. His trousers are the same checked trousers that he wears under his topcoat when breaking into M’s flat earlier in the film. They are in a small black and white glen check with an overlaid light blue check and have a flat front and turn-ups. Bond also wears black socks and black calf John Lobb Romsey two-eyelet chukka boots.

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Though Bond changes his clothes many time in Casino Royale, he mixes and matches many of the same pieces as a real person would do. This adds a realism to the film’s wardrobe that most other Bond films do not share. The shawl-collared cardigan and checked trousers are only two of the many pieces that make multiple appearances in the film. The t-shirt he wears in this scene may also be the same t-shirt he wears under his pea coat in the film’s opening scene.

Tan Suede Jacket from Matchless in Spectre

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When in Morocco in Spectre, Bond needs a cool jacket to conceal his firearm. For this purpose he wears a tan lightweight suede jacket from Matchless London. Matchless calls this jacket the “Craig Blouson”, but this is technically not a blouson since the waist is not drawn in. The jacket is longer than waist-length and sits over the top of the hips to cover the waistband of the low-rise trousers. The jacket has a zip front, side pockets and an ecru viscose rayon lining. The collar is two pieces and has a hook to close with. Bond wears the collar up in back to protect his neck from the sun but folded down a little in front to keep it away from his face. An unlined jacket would likely be a better choice for the hot weather in Morocco.

Under the suede jacket when Bond arrives in Morocco, Spectre brings a new take on a Bond staple: the navy polo. Bond’s polo from Tom Ford is made of a 57% cotton and 43% viscose rayon blend pique knit. Rayon makes the polo lighter than if it were just cotton, but cotton is stronger and more breathable. Instead of the usual buttoned placket, the shirt has an open V-neck. The collar and sleeve hems are a fine rib knit, and the shirt’s hem has a thick ribbed band like on a jumper. The polo has a close fit everywhere, and the mid-bicep-length sleeves perfectly curve around Bond’s shoulders and excellently show off his arms.

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Later in the film on the train across Morocco, Bond switches the polo for a blue and white end-on-end linen shirt. This shirt is mostly hidden under the jacket, but it has a short point collar that curls up. Medium blue buttons fasten down a plain placket, and there is no pocket on the front. There are darts down the front at the sides of the front panels for a very tapered waist. Front darts are usually only on women’s shirts, which help the shirts fit closely around their anatomy. Men do not need front darts in their shirts, and tapering at the sides with darts for the small of the back are enough to fit a shirt closely to a man’s physique. This shirt matches the “Morton” model from Orlebar Brown, who made the blue swimming trunks for Skyfall. The “Morton” has long sleeves with short, pointed cuffs that have two buttons around the circumference to fasten the cuff at different sizes.

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The khaki cotton gabardine chinos from Brunello Cucinelli are the same trousers that Bond wears later with his light brown Brunello Cucinelli jacket. They have a flat front, a low rise and narrow straight legs. Bond wears the bottoms rolled up for a casual look. The chinos are pressed with a crease down each leg, but the crease is faded and hardly noticeable. Bond wears the chinos with a brown woven leather belt from Brunello Cucinelli. The belt has a solid brown leather tab at the end with holes for the buckle to feed through. It is not the type of belt where the whole piece is braided and the buckle feeds through the braid.

The sunglasses are the Tom Ford Henry model. Bond’s boots are the Kenton Suede Boots from J. Crew in a tan colour appropriately called “Sahara”. They have five pairs of eyelets and three pairs of speed hooks, a plain toe and red mini-lug soles. The boots were likely chosen because they closely match the jacket, but the match looks too forced. Oiled leather desert boots could have been a better choice.

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The outfit of a tan jacket, navy polo and khaki chinos pays homage to a similar outfit that James Bond wears on a previous trip to Tangier in The Living Daylights. Though Timothy Dalton’s outfit in The Living Daylights had the right idea—and the execution is fine for the 1980s—it’s not as unique as Craig’s similar outfit in Spectre is. The clothes in Spectre are much higher quality and more interesting. The return of the suede jacket in Spectre also recalls the numerous suede jackets Roger Moore wears in his 1980s James Bond films.

A Nylon-Front Blouson and Ski Trousers in Solden

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For a snowy mountain adventure in Solden, Austria in Spectre, James Bond wears an elegant outfit of a nylon-front blouson, a mock turtleneck and vintage-inspired ski trousers. The zip-front blouson from Tom Ford is knitted with a fine rib in dark grey merino wool with elasticised cuffs and a mock turtleneck collar. The front of the blouson, however, is blue nylon with 12 large, down-filled ribs. There is a zipped slash pocket on either side of the front.

Under the blouson, Bond wears a mock turtleneck jumper from N.Peal in “Lapis Blue”. It is made from a fine gauge 70% cashmere and 30% silk blend. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. The warm, rich blue is flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion, and the bit of blue that shows from beneath the blouson’s collar brings the needed contrast to the dark shades of the rest of the outfit. The warm colour of the jumper is more like cerulean than a true lapis blue.

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Costume designer Jany Temime spoke to Bloomberg Business about the navy ski trousers, which Tom Ford calls the “Sky Pant”:

Those were based off French army ski trousers, 1960s ski trousers. I took them to Tom Ford, and he made them for us. It was very old fashioned the way he did it, with the same look.

Since they are based on 1960s trousers, the “Sky Pant” does not have the slim fit of all the other trousers than Bond wears in Spectre. They are tailored from a heavy brushed wool, woven in a pronounced steep twill. At the front there are double forward pleats. The pleats are stitched down roughly two inches at the top about half a centimetre into the pleat. It’s not uncommon for pleats to be stitched down for the first inch or two at the top to help them lay more neatly, but they’re ordinarily stitched down at the edge of the pleat. By stitching down the pleat away from the edge, the sharp edge of the pleat is continued up to the waistband for a less interrupted look whilst still benefitting from being stitched at the top.

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On each side of the trousers forward of the side seams is an offset side pocket with rearward-facing flaps that fasten down with a button. There is a a jetted pocket on either side of the rear. The legs are tapered and have stirrups and expanding gussets at the bottom. The trousers have belt loops, but we don’t see if Bond wears a belt with them.

Though the trousers are designed for skiing, James Bond does not ski in Spectre. These may be very stylish, but there are better modern alternatives for actual skiing. If they get wet, the elegant crease down each leg would disappear!

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Bond wears the trousers tucked into black Danner Mountain Light II 5″ boots. The boots lace with five pairs of lugs to the toe and two pairs of speed hooks at the top for a secure fit. The boots are made of one piece with leather plus a counter up the back. They have Vibram rubber soles with yellow cleats. Bond wears heavy grey socks folded over the top, meaning the trousers are worn inside the socks as well.

Bond’s sunglasses are from Vuarnet with black leather shields on the sides. The quilted black gloves are made by Agnelle.

James Bond Brings Back the Turtleneck

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If Daniel Craig’s fashion sense is anything to go on, the turtleneck has boldly returned. Craig had the power to return shawl collar cardigans to the forefront of fashion after wearing them as James Bond in Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace, and he will no doubt do the same for the turtleneck after wearing three in Spectre.

The turtleneck, also known as the polo neck or roll neck, is a knitted jumper that has a close-fitting high collar that rolls over to cover the neck all around. An alternative to the turtleneck is the shorter and more modern mock turtleneck, which does not fold over. Turtlenecks saw their heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, while mock turtlenecks ruled in the 1990s. Both the true turtleneck and the mock turtleneck are returning in Spectre.

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Daniel Craig wears a dark charcoal grey fine gauge mock turtleneck made of cashmere and silk from British company N.Peal on the teaser poster for Spectre with charcoal tick-patterned trousers and a shoulder holster. This look immediately recalls the 1973 film Live and Let Die, in which Roger Moore wears a black full turtleneck with black trousers and shoulder holster. Craig’s dark grey version better flatters his fair complexion and adds more subtle interest in updating the look. In the film, Craig will be wearing a dark blue-grey suede Racer Jacket from John Varvatos over the mock turtleneck to conceal his gun.

Both Daniel Craig in Spectre and Roger Moore in Live and Let Die were inspired to wear this look after Steve McQueen famously wore a dark blue turtleneck sweater with a shoulder holster as police lieutenant Frank Bullitt in the 1968 film Bullitt. This look is only seen briefly at the end of the film since he is usually wearing a brown herringbone, elbow-patched tweed jacket to hide his gun and holster. Bullitt‘s poster and publicity stills, which are without the jacket, are what made the look so iconic. Not only does Daniel Craig copy McQueen’s turtleneck and shoulder holster look in Spectre, but he also wears the same brown suede Sanders & Sanders “Playboy” chukka boots that McQueen wears in Bullitt.

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Steve McQueen in Bullitt

Before Steve McQueen wore the turtleneck and holster in Bullitt, it was a popular look for agents in the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Robert Vaughn first wore this look as Napoleon Solo in the 1965 episode “The Four-Steps Affair”, but David McCallum’s character Illya Kuryakin is more famous for the look and first wore it in the following episode “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”.

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David McCallum as Illya Kuryakin in “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”

Besides the charcoal grey mock turtleneck, Daniel Craig wears another mock turtleneck in Spectre under a dark grey nylon-front knitted wool blouson from Tom Ford while on his mission in snowy Austria. This example, which is also from N.Peal, is identical to the dark charcoal grey piece, except it is made in a vivid medium shade of blue called “Lapis Blue”.

Daniel Craig wears a third turtleneck in Spectre from N.Peal in a colour they call “Fumo Grey”, which is a light and warm shade of grey. This turtleneck is the more traditional full roll-neck style and is designed for warmth. It is cable-knitted and in a heavier Mongolian cashmere. Craig wears it under a heavy navy wool zip-front blouson in the Austrian Alps.

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N.Peal turtleneck in “Fumo Grey” from Spectre

Spectre and Live and Let Die are not the only two James Bond films to feature turtlenecks. Sean Connery introduced the mock turtleneck to the Bond in the 1967 film You Only Live Twice when he wears a grey top to infiltrate the SPECTRE volcano headquarters. Sean Connery wears full turtlenecks in Diamond Are Forever with his brown tweed jackets. In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, George Lazenby wears orange and white turtlenecks as part of his golf and ski outfits, respectively.

Roger Moore undoubtedly holds the status as the turtleneck James Bond. In The Spy Who Loved Me he wears a navy turtleneck as part of his naval battle dress, and in Moonraker he wears a cream turtleneck under a double-breasted navy blazer. The 1981 Bond film For Your Eyes Only is tied with Spectre for featuring the most turtlenecks. In this film, Moore wears his turtlenecks under a shearling blouson and a ski jacket in the Italian Alps as well as under a lightweight blouson in Greece. Until Spectre, Die Another Day was the last Bond film to feature a turtleneck. Pierce Brosnan wears a heavy cashmere cable-knit mock turtleneck from the Scottish company Ballantyne, now liquidated, in the 2002 film.

Bond's last turtleneck in Die Another Day

Bond’s last turtleneck in Die Another Day

This article was originally published in 20 Minuten.

The Wild Geese: Tan Leather Bomber Jacket

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To celebrate Roger Moore’s 88th birthday today, we look at his classic 1978 action film The Wild Geese. The Wild Geese stars Moore alongside Richard Burton and Richard Harris in a film about mercenaries in Africa. In two scenes in The Wild Geese, Moore wears a tan leather bomber jacket along with some of his classic wardrobe items.

The bomber blouson-style jacket is in a flattering dark shade of tan known as Windsor tan. The jacket buttons up the front with seven gilt buttons, and there are two additional buttons on the collar that button backwards from the revers of the left side onto the right side of the collar. The leather jacket is constructed with a yoke in front, raglan sleeves and only two pieces in back. The inside of the collar, the cuffs and the hem are made of mottled beige ribbed knit wool that’s a close match to the jumpers he wears under the jacket. Slash pockets on either side at the waist have tabs that fasten with gilt buttons.

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Under the bomber jacket, Moore first wears a v-neck jumper and a sky blue shirt. The jumper is beige with a hint of olive and most likely made of cashmere. The shirt is made by Frank Foster with the same long point collar that he made for Roger Moore to wear in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. The shirt has a front placket stitched close to the centre. The shirt also has button cuffs, but since the jumper’s cuffs are mostly covering the shirt’s cuffs we can’t tell if they are the Lapidus-style tab cuffs that Moore was wearing as Bond at the time. It’s unfortunate that Moore leaves the first two buttons open on his shirt, since the purpose of such a low V-neck opening on the jumper should not be to show off his chest and necklace. The low V-neck is better suited to a buttoned shirt collar with a tie. But alas, this was the fashion of the 1970s.

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In the following scene, Moore replaces his V-neck jumper and blue shirt for a tight-fitting, beige cashmere polo neck jumper. With both outfits, Moore wears tan trousers with a flat front and flared legs. Because the trousers have a sharp crease down each leg, they are likely wool gabardine. But judging by the creasing around the crotch, the trousers are probably lighter weight than one would typically wear with a heavy bomber jacket. Moore wears tan socks and light brown slip-on shoes with the first outfit, and he probably wears the same with the second outfit.

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Layer Cake: A Navy Pinstripe Suit Jacket with Jeans

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In the 2004 film Layer Cake, Daniel Craig wears striped suit jackets with jeans instead of the matching suit trousers. It was a popular fashion trend at that time, and it is still popular in some circles. Just as the mullet hairstyle has been described as “business in the front, party in the back”, wearing a pinstriped suit jacket with jeans has a similar effect. The suit jacket on the top is all business whilst the denim jeans on the bottom are as casual as trousers can be. Those who favour the mullet may see some appeal in this unorthodox combination, but like the mullet, this is not a conventionally attractive look. It’s difficult to make any tailored jacket look good with jeans, but rustic tweeds come closest since they match the rough, heavy look of denim. Robert Redford shows a great example of how to pair a tweed jacket with jeans in the 1975 film Three Days of the Condor.

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Craig’s jacket in Layer Cake can by no means be called a sports coat. Sports coats are, as the name suggests, sporty, whilst pinstriped jackets are business wear and part of a suit. The main thing that separates a suit jacket from a sports coat is the cloth it is made from. Sports coats are made from a material that has texture, whether it’s tweed, hopsack, cashmere, silk, linen, corduroy or any number of other materials. These materials are either solid or have a checked pattern. Suits can also be made of any of these textured materials, but they would informal sports suits and not business suits. Business suits are typically made from smooth worsteds and sometimes flannel. They may be solid, semi-solid, striped or have a subtle check.

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Certain cloths can work for both business suits and sports coats, like solid navy serge, bolder checks and woollen flannel. Jackets in these materials, however, need sporty details to make them work as sports coats, These details may include contrasting buttons, swelled edges, patch pockets or slanted pockets. But most worsteds don’t work well as odd jackets, especially not jackets with pinstripes or chalk stripes. And you can’t just put contrasting horn buttons on any suit jacket and turn it into a sports coat.

Daniel Craig’s navy pinstripe jacket is a suit jacket because it is made in a worsted business suit material. The button two jacket is tailored with straight shoulders, gently roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It was most likely purchased ready-to-wear from an English brand. The jacket has a high button stance, straight flap pockets, four buttons on the cuffs and double vents. The jacket mostly fits well, though the sleeves are too long.

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Craig wears the suit jacket with medium wash denim jeans. The jeans have a medium-low rise, five pocket design and straight legs. A wide brown belt holds up the jeans. Craig’s shoes are dark brown chelsea boots.

Craig wears two different shirts with this outfit, a white formal shirt and a grey t-shirt. The white shirt has a tall two-button spread collar, two-button cuffs, front placket stitched 3/8″ from the edge in the traditional English fashion. The placket means that the shirt is from an English brand, and the tall collar likely signifies a brand with a slight fashion edge or a special fashion line. Craig wears the shirt tucked into his jeans.

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When Craig doesn’t wear the white shirt, he wears only a grey crew neck, raglan-sleeve t-shirt under the jacket. Unlike with the white shirt, Craig does not tuck the t-shirt. Though the body of the shirt drapes over Craig’s body, the short sleeves fit tightly around his upper arm. Though t-shirts go well with jeans, it makes the suit jacket look even more out of place with the jeans. T-shirts have a practical disadvantage with tailored jackets. Whilst shirts with a collar and long sleeves protect the jacket from the body’s oils and shedding, t-shirts offer the jacket not protection. Because jackets are considerably more expensive than shirts are, it makes sense to protect them.

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