Max Denbigh’s Grey Glen Check Suit

Denbigh-Dark-Grey-Glen-Check-Suit

Andrew Scott’s Max Denbigh, the Director-General of the Joint Security Service who also goes by “C”, dresses in dark suits with a fashionable edge in Spectre. Denbigh’s modern clothes contrast with M’s traditional clothes without looking inappropriately fashion forward. The clthes reflect C’s attitude when he speaks to M regarding his new methods versus the old 00-section: “It’s the future, and you’re not.” C’s suits are rooted in the British tradition with a hint of 1960s fashion, whilst his shirts take their cues from fashion.

Denbigh-Dark-Grey-Glen-Check-Suit-2

When meeting with M in M’s office at the beginning of Spectre and when encountering M in the corridor later in the film, Denbigh wears a black and grey glen check suit. The suit jacket has an English silhouette with straight shoulders and roped sleeveheads. The chest is lean with a close fit and the waist is suppressed, but it’s not as tight as the waists of Daniel Craig’s suit jackets.

The suit jacket has two buttons on the front in a slightly high stance. The lapels are medium-narrow with small fishmouth notches, and they are finished with noticeable pick stitching. The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with flaps, four cuff buttons and a single vent. The suit’s trousers have a flat front and side adjusters. The legs are narrow and straight.

Denbigh-Dark-Grey-Glen-Check-Suit-3

On the two occasions Denbigh wears this suit he wears it with different shirts and ties. The first shirt he wears with it is ecru with a self stripe. With this shirt he wears a black tie with s random pattern of printed white dots that looks like a star-filled night sky. The second shirt he wears with it is cream with grey diamonds, most likely a printed pattern. The tie with the second shirt is black with alternating white and dark grey dotted lines. The dots on the tie clash with the similar scale of the shirt’s pattern. Both shirts are made in the same style. They have spread collars with short stands and short points, button cuffs and front plackets. The ties are tied in four-in-hand knots.

Denbigh-Dark-Grey-Glen-Check-Suit-4

Remington Steele: Checked Jacket with Throat Latch and Elbow Patches

Remington-Steele-Checked-Jacket

In the fifth episode of Remington Steele, titled “Thou Shalt Not Steele”, Pierce Brosnan wears a sporty checked tweed jacket with a jumper and knitted tie. Brosnan also wears this jacket in five subsequent episodes. The jacket is black and cream, most likely in a two-and-two check. A two-and-two check alternates two light yarns (cream in this jacket) and two dark yarns (black in this jacket) in both the warp and the weft of an even twill weave, and it’s the section of a Glen Urquhart check opposite the houndstooth (four-and-four) section. All else equal, a two-and-two check would be half the size of a houndstooth check, and its shape is simpler and boxier. It is possible that the check on Brosnan’s jacket may have more than just these two colours, but I believe that this is essentially what the check is.

Two-and-Two

A black and cream two-and-two check

The jacket is typical of the early 1980s and has a low—but not excessively low—gorge (lapel notch) and two buttons on the front in a low stance. The shoulders are strong, but narrow, with a pagoda shape and a lot of padding. The jacket has a lean chest and a suppressed waist, which gives this jacket a very elegant shape. When combined with the pagoda shoulders, the jacket’s silhouette endows Brosnan with a more powerful, but not unnatural, look.

This jacket has a number of sporty details. One of the most unusual and sportiest is the throat latch, which is also known as a storm tab. It allows the collar to be closed across the front of the neck when turned up. They’re often in the form of a separate piece of fabric that buttons onto the back of the collar and sticks out from the left side of the collar. The throat latch on this jacket is a permanent feature, and it’s in the form of a grey cord loop that extends from the left side of the collar.

Remington-Steele-Checked-Jacket-3

Sporty leather buttons and elbow patches trim this jacket. The buttons are braided leather in black to match the black in the jacket as well as provide contrast with the jacket’s overall colour. The elbow patches are grey-brown suede so they blend in with the jacket. The jacket’s hip pockets are open patch pockets and the breast pocket is a welt pocket. There are three buttons on the cuffs and double vents at the rear.

Brosnan leaves his jacket open. Either it’s too fitted to be able to button with a jumper underneath or Brosnan simply wants to show off his jumper. The fancy striped wool jumper is grey and cream to complement the jacket, but being grey instead of black gives some contrast with the jacket. It has a deep V-neck to show off the tie. The trousers are charcoal—either lightweight flannel or a medium-weight worsted—and have a flat front and straight legs.

Remington-Steele-Checked-Jacket-2

Under the jumper, Brosnan wears a pale blue poplin shirt with a point collar, narrow placket and rounded double cuffs. The point collar is worn with a gold collar bar of the slide-on variety. Some people feel that a slide-on or clip-on collar bar is to clip-on braces as a collar pin is to a button-on braces. They feel that a slide-on collar bar is a cheap approximation of a proper collar pin. However, Brosnan’s slide-on collar bar gets the job done—it pops the tie out from the collar—without damaging the shirt. True collar pins do indeed damage collars when they poke holes through the cloth, and after repeated use the damage is noticeable. A slide-on collar bar is good for beginners who aren’t sure if they want to commit to the damage a proper collar pin inflicts on the shirt. Brosnan, however, is not a beginner and should be using a proper collar pin.

Brosnan wears the double cuffs with the cuffs extended—not folded—and fastened like single-link cuffs, but it works because the cuffs are very short for double cuffs. There is an unused set of link-holes close to the base of the cuff. The sleeve length is likely meant for a man with shorter arms to accommodate the cuff folding in half, which would end up being less than two inches wide. The cuff unfolded as Brosnan wears it is approximately 3 1/2 inches wide.

Remington-Steele-Blue-Shirt-Grey-Knitted-TIe

I’ve said before that jumpers and kissing cuffs (when the ends of the cuff meet back-to-back rather than overlapping) don’t pair well together. The snug cuffs on the jumper don’t match the shape of the shirt’s cuffs, and the jumper’s cuffs are stretched out by the shirt’s cuffs. Here the shirt’s cuffs extend past the jumper’s to show the cufflinks, and the jumper’s cuffs are usually obscured under the jacket sleeves. Though wearing a jumper with kissing shirt cuffs isn’t ideal, this is a creative way to pair a jumper with such shirt cuffs. A sleeveless jumper would have been better for this outfit.

The tie is grey knitted silk and tied in, surprisingly, a full windsor knot. Brosnan knots his tie in a scene in this episode. He ties the tie with the wide blade much longer than the narrow blade, which allows him to tuck the wide blade into his trousers for a neat look under the jumper. Tying the tie further up means that the tie will be narrower in the knot area and will create a smaller knot. The small windsor knot on Brosnan’s tie has a very clean look, which can be difficult to achieve with a four-in-hand knot on a knitted tie. Brosnan finishes the outfit with a puffed silver satin silk pocket square that complements the greys in the outfit whist contrasting them in texture.

Preferably, the belt and shoes should match the jacket’s black leather buttons. However, matching all leathers is not required and Brosnan decides to pair this informal outfit, not inappropriately, with brown shoes and a brown belt. A black belt and black shoes may have been a better choice, especially since Brosnan wears this outfit in the evening, but the brown belt and shoes dress down the outfit.

Remington-Steele-Blue-Shirt-Jumper

“Thou Shalt Not Steele” is the first episode of Remington Steele to feature Pierce Brosnan’s then-wife Cassandra Harris, who played Countess Lisl von Schlaf opposite Roger Moore in For Your Eyes Only a year earlier .

A Black Herringbone Suit for a Funeral in Spectre

Spectre-Black-Herringbone-Suit

James Bond’s black herringbone three-piece suit in Spectre introduces Tom Ford’s signature “Windsor” model to the Bond series. This model is characterised by wide peaked lapels and aggressive shoulders. The look is inspired by suits from the 1940s as well as by 1960s and 1970s British designer Tommy Nutter’s suits. Though Bond is in disguise as an Italian gangster, the style of his suit is much more British than it is Italian. Bold and flashy doesn’t mean it’s Italian, but it’s also not the look a traditional English gentleman would sport either.

Bond has typically avoided wearing solid black suits because they’re neither the most traditional nor the most stylish. They have their place at funerals, which makes this black suit fitting for the situation. The only other time Bond wears a solid black suit is to Morton Slumber’s funeral home in Diamonds Are Forever. That suit is also a three-piece, and this suit is its direct successor. Though black suits usually look dull, this suiting is woven in a large herringbone weave to give it texture so it doesn’t look flat. Whilst this suit is 100% wool, the herringbone weave means it reflects more light and ends up looking livelier and shinier. Seeing it in person, it’s brighter than all of the other blacks around, even though it is still black. This is the rare example of an exciting black suiting.

The jacket has straight shoulders with a heavy amount of padding and roped sleeveheads. There is fullness and shape in the chest, which gives it a more bespoke look and feel, but the chest still fits close to the body, as does the waist. The length is a bit on the short side. The front has two buttons at a medium stance and medium-wide peaked lapels with belly. Belly is the convex curve of the outer edge that makes the lapels look wider than they actually are. Tom Ford spoke about his preference for wide lapels in a documentary that aired on 23 October 2011 as the second episode of the television programme Visionaries: Inside the Creative Mind:

I like a big lapel. I’ve always hated little skinny lapels. It doesn’t mean I haven’t ever done them before, but I’ve always felt they feel a little sad, like you don’t have enough fabric.

The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with wide flaps and a ticket pocket. The breast pocket has a curved “barchetta” shape. There are five buttons on the cuffs, and the last button has a longer buttonhole and is left open. There is a single vent to the back.

The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button—the last button and buttonhole are placed on the cutaway part at the bottom and would strain if fastened. There are four curved welt pockets on the front that match the style of the jacket’s breast pocket.

The trousers have a flat front, a medium low rise and narrow, straight legs with plain hems. This is the only Tom Ford suit of all the Bond films to not have turn-ups on the trousers, and this suit may not have turn-ups because it is more formal than any other suit Daniel Craig has worn in his Bond films. The waistband has a square extension with a hidden hook-and-eye closure and slide-buckle adjusters at the sides. The side pockets are on the seam, which curves forward at the top.

Spectre-Black-Herringbone-Suit-2

Costume designer Jany Temime was quoted about this outfit from Spectre on the James Bond 007 Facebook page:

Bond is in disguise and has to fit in with gangsters, moving in a daring way. The details in the shirt, the collar is more Italian style: it is Bond in disguise.

The white cotton poplin shirt from Tom Ford has a point collar with eyelets and metal bar, cocktail cuffs, a plain front and rear darts for a slim fit. Though Temime says the pinned collar is an Italian style, it’s not particularly Italian these days. It has some historical association with both Italians and Americans. Roger Moore wears a pinned collar in his 1976 film Street People when playing his Sicilian father in 1930s flashbacks. Pierce Brosnan almost always wears pinned collars during the first two series of Remington Steele, which reflected trends in America at the time as well as his character’s love for classic Hollywood films. Pinned collars are too fussy for James Bond to wear apart from being in disguise, and they’re not particularly appropriate for a modern British character.

Tom Ford calls the cocktail cuff on his shirts the “Dr. No cuff”, named after the first Bond film to feature Bond wearing shirts with cocktail cuffs. The cuff has a similarly rounded shape to the cocktail cuffs that Sean Connery wears in five of his Bond films, though the two buttons on this cuff are both positioned closer to the fold. The top button on this cuff is mostly hidden under the fold, whilst it’s always visible on Connery’s cuffs when has has both buttons fastened. Spectre is the ninth Bond film to feature James Bond wearing cocktail cuffs, after five films with Sean Connery and three films with Roger Moore. Turnbull & Asser made a bespoke cocktail cuff pattern for Pierce Brosnan when making shirts for Die Another Day, but no shirts cocktail cuffs were featured in that film.

The black-on-black woven check silk tie is 9.5 cm—or 3 3/4 inches—wide to go with the wide lapels on the suit jacket. The lapels are wider than the tie, though ties that are narrower than the lapels can still work. To fit his disguise as a gangster, Bond knots his tie in a windsor knot. Bond completes his outfit with a white silk handkerchief with a black border stuffed—rather than meticulously folded—into his breast pocket. The handkerchief measures 40 cm by 40 cm.

The boots that Bond wears with this suit are the flashy Crockett & Jones Camberley model in black calf. The style is best described as a double-monk boot, where the straps buckle from the inside quarter over the outside quarter. Like on monk shoes, the quarter are both over the tongue. This boot is not a Jodhpur boot, where the vamp and tongue are positioned on top of the quarters. Boots are a good match with narrow trousers because narrow trousers must be hemmed shorter, and thus boots will prevent sock from showing with shorter trousers. Whilst monk boots are not likely something the literary James Bond would wear, they satisfy his dislike for laces.

Bond wears this suit with a black double-breasted bridge coat, sunglasses and black driving gloves.

The Untraditional Ivory Dinner Jacket in Spectre

Spectre-Ivory-DInner-Jacket

After a 30-year gap, James Bond finally wears an ivory dinner jacket again in Spectre. A View to a Kill was the last film that featured Bond in an ivory dinner jacket. Daniel Craig’s dinner jacket in Spectre is made in Tom Ford’s “Windsor” model, which is Ford’s most famous model, characterised by its wide peaked lapels with belly and aggressive shoulders. The look is inspired by suits from the 1940s as well as by British designer Tommy Nutter’s suits. Though the overall cut of this dinner jacket in Spectre is classic-inspired, the details are not.

Bond’s visit to Morocco in Spectre necessitated the return of the ivory dinner jacket. Costume designer Jany Temime is quoted about this dinner jacket in the book Blood Sweat and Bond: Behind the Scenes of Spectre curated by Rankin:

I told Sam [Mendes] I couldn’t do a better tuxedo than Skyfall. But then I thought Morocco deserved that colonial touch, a feeling of Casablanca where time stops and everything is so iconic.

Temime is also quoted on the James Bond 007 Facebook page saying something similar about this dinner jacket:

It was very hard to do better than the Skyfall blue tuxedo but I took my inspiration from Humphrey Bogart in the film Casablanca and Morocco. Daniel added the red carnation buttonhole and it looked absolutely sublime.

Humphrey Bogart’s ivory double-breasted, shawl-collar dinner jacket in Casablanca is the most famous ivory dinner jacket in cinematic history (which Emilio Largo copied in Thunderball), and Bond’s trip to Morocco along with his status of “black tie master” gave him an obligation to honour that piece. Though a shawl collar would have brought more of the spirit of Casablanca to this dinner jacket, Temime instead went with peaked lapels to follow the Bond style established by Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Goldfinger. The wider, more classic peaked lapels on this Tom Ford dinner jacket actually make it more closely resemble Sean Connery’s dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever than the jacket in Goldfinger. Though the red carnation makes us think of Goldfinger, the dinner jacket itself is quite different from any dinner jacket Bond has previous worn.

The dinner jacket is made from a breathable silk and viscose faille. It is cut with a shaped—but close—chest and a suppressed waist. The shoulders are straight with a healthy amount of of padding and are finished with roped sleeveheads. The shoulders, however, look less aggressive than on Tom Ford’s usual “Windsor” jackets and have a more natural look. The jacket length is a little on the short side.

Spectre-Ivory-DInner-Jacket-2

The details are what throw off this dinner jacket. The most obvious error is a button two front, which already brings this dinner jacket down to the level of Timothy Dalton’s black dinner jacket in Licence to Kill. A single-breasted dinner jacket should only have one button, no exception. The second button disrupts the elegant lines that a dinner jacket should have. The single vent is another error on this dinner jacket. Most traditionally, a dinner jacket should not have any vents, though short double vents have been acceptable for half a century. The single vent is the sportiest of all vent styles and is completely out of place on a dinner jacket.

Silk facings—grosgrain silk on this dinner jacket—are also an untraditional detail. The lapels, jetted pocket and covered buttons (including the five on the sleeve) are all trimmed in grosgrain silk. Whilst black and midnight blue dinner jackets need silk facings to distinguish them from suit jackets, a ivory dinner jacket does not need this differentiation. Without silk facings, an ivory dinner jacket still looks nothing like a sports coat. On film, the silk facings aren’t very apparent, but the facings on this jacket look quite gaudy in person. Silk facings also mean that there will be two different silks in the outfit—white on the jacket versus black on the the trouser stripes and accessories. The black silk bow tie clashes against the white silk lapels.

All of the untraditional details—the second button on the front, the single vent and the silk facings—are marks of a cheap rental and separate this dinner jacket from the five elegant dinner jackets Bond has previously worn. The construction—apparent in the shaping—and materials put into a Tom Ford jacket, however, ensure that it does not look cheap. This dinner jacket stands above Dalton’s from Licence to Kill based on its better fit and superior quality, but all others in the series—ivory, black or midnight blue—are done better.

Bond wears the ivory dinner jacket with black wool and mohair blend grain de poudre black tie trousers. Grain de poudre translates from French into English as “grain power”, and it has a fine diagonal grainy texture. Mohair gives the trousers a bit of sheen whilst making them slightly more comfortable in the Moroccan heat. The trousers have a flat front, medium-low rise, an extended waistband with a hook-and-eye closure, slide-buckle side adjusters and a black satin silk stripe down the outseam on either side. The lower rise of the trousers is masked by a black satin silk cummerbund from Tom Ford, which has only two large pleats. White moiré braces from Albert Thurston hold up the trousers, and these are the same braces Bond wears with his black Brioni dinner suit in Casino Royale and his midnight blue Tom Ford dinner suit in Skyfall.

Spectre-Ivory-DInner-Jacket-3

The white cotton poplin dress shirt is also from Tom Ford, and its details recall many of the shirts Sean Connery and Roger Moore wore in their Bond films. It has Tom Ford’s “small collar”, which is a slightly short classic spread collar. The front has a pleated bib and is fastened with mother-of-pearl buttons. Spectre marks the first time since The Living Daylights that Bond has had visible mother-of-pearl buttons down the front placket of his dress shirt. The shirts in the films since have either shown studs down the front or covered the buttons with a fly front placket. The shirt also has double cuffs, gauntlet button, a split yoke and darts in the back.

Bond’s black diamond-pointed, butterfly-shaped bow tie should be in satin silk to match the satin cummerbund and satin stripes on the trousers. However, it does not have much sheen and is likely grosgrain to match the texture of the lapels. This is the third time Bond wears the often-neglected classic diamond bow tie, after Dr. No and Quantum of Solace.

Daniel Craig chose a red carnation to wear in the lapel on this dinner jacket to pay homage to Goldfinger, even though the dinner jacket only superficially resembles the dinner jacket Sean Connery wears in Goldfinger. The heavy filters in Spectre make the carnation looks much darker than it looks in reality.

Bond’s shoes are the Crockett & Jones “Alex” model wholecut in black calf. The sleek and clean elegance of the plain wholecut is a modern alternative to patent plain-toe oxford or opera pump. Patent leather looks passé to some, whilst well-polished calf can have a more understated look. The “Alex” has five eyelet pairs and a chiselled toe. Bond wears the same shoes with his midnight blue dinner suit in Skyfall.

The Quiller Memorandum: A Dependable Grey Suit

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-1

The popularity of the spy genre in the 1960s brought us the 1966 film The Quiller Memorandum. The character Qullier was originally written by novelist Elleston Trevor—under the pseudonym Adam Hall—as a British agent in the 1965 novel The Berlin Memorandum. In The Quiller Memorandum he is an American played by American actor George Segal, but he is still working for the British.

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-2

The Quiller Memorandum has a few things in common with the James Bond series, including a John Barry score (which is very different from his Bond scores), a song sung by “From Russia With Love” singer Matt Monro, and a villain played by Max von Sydow (who played Blofed in the unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again). Though the film is not especially unique or interesting, the main character is well-dressed in a Bond-like manner. Like Cary Grant does in North By Northwest, George Segal wears a single suit throughout almost the entire film. Only in the final scene of the film does Segal change his clothes. But unlike in Northwest By Northwest, the suit in The Quiller Memorandum never has a chance to get cleaned.

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-3

Though Quiller is an American in this film, the film was made in England and Germany, and George Segal is almost certainly wearing an English suit. Like Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, Segal’s suit has an unassuming look that is perfect for a spy. The suit is tailored in a Bond-like lightweight medium grey pick-and-pick wool and has a similar cut to Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, but with a few notable differences. The suits are similar in that jackets both button two and are cut with soft shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a full chest, a gently nipped waist and narrow lapels. Instead of the low button stance on Connery’s suit jackets, Segal’s suit jacket has a medium button stance.

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-4

Segal’s suit jacket is cut with a slightly short length to reflect the contemporary trends, but the jacket is just long enough to cover his buttocks. It is detailed with jetted pockets, three cuff buttons and double vents. Black buttons contrast with the jacket. The suit trousers have an extended waistband with a hidden hook-and-eye closure, “Daks top” side adjusters with two buttons, slanted side pockets, front darts (positioned in front of the pockets) and straight legs with turn-ups.

Under the suit, Segal wears an ecru shirt with a point collar that has a lot of tie space, a front placket and rounded single-button cuffs. The cuff button is placed near the base of the cuff. The textured burgundy tie is very flattering to Segal’s warm spring complexion and blonde hair, and he ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Segal wears black lace-up shoes with his suit.

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-6

George Segal wears clothes by On Her Majesty’s Secret Service tailor Dimi Major in the 1973 film A Touch of Class. The suit in The Quiller Memorandum shares a slight resemblance with Dimi Major’s cut, and the shoulders on Segal’s suits in A Touch of Class look identical to this suit’s shoulders. The Quiller suit lacks the fashionable flair that could be found on George Lazenby’s suits three years later, and though the shape of the jacket’s lapels is different, the trouser style is the same. There is a possibility that Dimi Major could have made this suit.

The-Quiller-Memorandum-Grey-Suit-5

Layer Cake: A Navy Pinstripe Suit Jacket with Jeans

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans

In the 2004 film Layer Cake, Daniel Craig wears striped suit jackets with jeans instead of the matching suit trousers. It was a popular fashion trend at that time, and it is still popular in some circles. Just as the mullet hairstyle has been described as “business in the front, party in the back”, wearing a pinstriped suit jacket with jeans has a similar effect. The suit jacket on the top is all business whilst the denim jeans on the bottom are as casual as trousers can be. Those who favour the mullet may see some appeal in this unorthodox combination, but like the mullet, this is not a conventionally attractive look. It’s difficult to make any tailored jacket look good with jeans, but rustic tweeds come closest since they match the rough, heavy look of denim. Robert Redford shows a great example of how to pair a tweed jacket with jeans in the 1975 film Three Days of the Condor.

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans-2

Craig’s jacket in Layer Cake can by no means be called a sports coat. Sports coats are, as the name suggests, sporty, whilst pinstriped jackets are business wear and part of a suit. The main thing that separates a suit jacket from a sports coat is the cloth it is made from. Sports coats are made from a material that has texture, whether it’s tweed, hopsack, cashmere, silk, linen, corduroy or any number of other materials. These materials are either solid or have a checked pattern. Suits can also be made of any of these textured materials, but they would informal sports suits and not business suits. Business suits are typically made from smooth worsteds and sometimes flannel. They may be solid, semi-solid, striped or have a subtle check.

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans-3

Certain cloths can work for both business suits and sports coats, like solid navy serge, bolder checks and woollen flannel. Jackets in these materials, however, need sporty details to make them work as sports coats, These details may include contrasting buttons, swelled edges, patch pockets or slanted pockets. But most worsteds don’t work well as odd jackets, especially not jackets with pinstripes or chalk stripes. And you can’t just put contrasting horn buttons on any suit jacket and turn it into a sports coat.

Daniel Craig’s navy pinstripe jacket is a suit jacket because it is made in a worsted business suit material. The button two jacket is tailored with straight shoulders, gently roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It was most likely purchased ready-to-wear from an English brand. The jacket has a high button stance, straight flap pockets, four buttons on the cuffs and double vents. The jacket mostly fits well, though the sleeves are too long.

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans-4

Craig wears the suit jacket with medium wash denim jeans. The jeans have a medium-low rise, five pocket design and straight legs. A wide brown belt holds up the jeans. Craig’s shoes are dark brown chelsea boots.

Craig wears two different shirts with this outfit, a white formal shirt and a grey t-shirt. The white shirt has a tall two-button spread collar, two-button cuffs, front placket stitched 3/8″ from the edge in the traditional English fashion. The placket means that the shirt is from an English brand, and the tall collar likely signifies a brand with a slight fashion edge or a special fashion line. Craig wears the shirt tucked into his jeans.

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans-5

When Craig doesn’t wear the white shirt, he wears only a grey crew neck, raglan-sleeve t-shirt under the jacket. Unlike with the white shirt, Craig does not tuck the t-shirt. Though the body of the shirt drapes over Craig’s body, the short sleeves fit tightly around his upper arm. Though t-shirts go well with jeans, it makes the suit jacket look even more out of place with the jeans. T-shirts have a practical disadvantage with tailored jackets. Whilst shirts with a collar and long sleeves protect the jacket from the body’s oils and shedding, t-shirts offer the jacket not protection. Because jackets are considerably more expensive than shirts are, it makes sense to protect them.

Layer-Cake-Navy-Pinstripe-Jacket-Jeans-6

The Rock: Sean Connery’s Navy Three-Piece Suit

Sean-Connery-The-Rock-Suit

A happy 85th birthday today to Sean Connery. In The Rock, Sean Connery plays John Mason, a British national who escaped from Alcatraz. The Mason character was written as an homage to Bond and has a lot in common with Bond. John Spencer’s character FBI Director Womack states that Mason is a British operative but says, “Of course the British claimed they’d never heard of him.” Womack also says, “This man knows our most intimate secrets from the last half-century…Mason’s angry. He’s lethal. He’s a trained killer.”

Sean-Connery-The-Rock-Suit-2

Mason even speaks like Bond when he responds to Nicolas Cage’s character Goodspeed’s introduction with the Diamonds Are Forever line, “But of course you are.” For Mason to agree to cooperate with the FBI, he makes a Bond-like demand: “I want a suite, a shower, a shave, the feel of a suit.” The new navy worsted three-piece suit he gets is what matters most, as far as this blog is concerned.

Sean-Connery-The-Rock-Suit-3

Though The Rock was released in 1996, Sean Connery’s suit more closely resembles an late 1980s/early 90s suit. The button two suit jacket has a low button stance and a very low gorge, which places the lapel notch almost in the middle of the chest. Sean Connery’s prominent shoulders make the jacket’s shoulders look more padded than they actually are. Still, the shoulders have a fair amount of padding, but natural sleeveheads gives the shoulders a natural but neat curve.

Sean-Connery-The-Rock-Suit-Waistcoat

The suit jacket is cut with a moderately full chest and a gently suppressed waist. The jacket is detailed with flapped pockets, three cuff buttons and no vent in the rear. The suit’s waistcoat has five buttons. The suit trousers have a full cut, likely with double or triple reverse pleats. The legs are wide but slightly tapered. The suit is very similar to the suits Timothy Dalton wears in Licence to Kill, but Connery’s suit has a much cleaner fit. Though this suit is strongly influenced by fashion in its proportions, it follows the principles of a good fit.

Connery’s white shirt has a spread collar with tie space and a sewn interfacing (revealed by a poor sloppy job), front placket and square cuffs with either one or two buttons. The collar design and construction could mean that this shirt is from an English maker. The tie has alternating wide navy and gold stripes. The navy stripes are woven in a twill weave whilst the gold stripes are woven with floats to look like a basket weave. Connery’s shoes are black single monk shoes.

Sean-Connery-The-Rock-Suit-Tie

Daniel Craig Dresses Up For Heineken

Heineken-James-Bond

Yesterday, GQ-Magazine.co.uk published three photos of Daniel Craig taken for a partnership between James Bond and Heineken. Though this partnership with the beer company involves Spectre, Daniel Craig is not in costume as James Bond, though he is dressed in a Bond-like manner. Though GQ identifies this navy pick-and-pick suit as a Tom Ford O’Connor suit, this is certainly not a Tom Ford Suit. This suit isn’t as interesting or unique as a Tom Ford suit, and it’s most likely a ready-to-wear suit, but Daniel Craig looks like James Bond in it.

Tom Ford suit jackets always have a curved “barchetta” breast pocket, which this suit jacket lacks. O’Connor suit jackets also have slanted hip pockets, whilst this jacket has straight pockets. The O’Connor jackets in Spectre are button three roll two, whilst this jacket is just a button two like the ready-to-wear O’Connor jackets. The Spectre suit jackets also have four cuff buttons whiles this jacket has only three cuff buttons. The buttons on this navy suit contrast in medium-light grey urea. And whilst Daniel Craig’s O’Connor jackets always have a single vent, this jacket has double vents. The narrow lapels are around the same width as the O’Connor lapels, but the notch on this jacket is smaller.

Craig’s suit jacket is cut with straight padded shoulders, gently roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. Overall, the suit has a very close fit, but it has a slightly cleaner fit than the Tom Ford suits he wears in Spectre. Because of his pose, it’s difficult to tell if the pulling at the waist is a result of the jacket being a little too tight, or if it’s because of the pose. The only serious problem with the fit of this jacket is the short length, which is fashionably on purpose. The suit trousers have a narrow, tapered leg with turn-ups, which contrast with the straight leg on Tom Ford trousers.

Under the suit, Daniel Craig wears a white shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. Though Craig wears similarly styled shirts made by Tom Ford in Spectre, this shirt is not one of those shirts. This shirt’s point collar is a bit shorter than the Tom Ford point collars and does not frame his face as well, but it doesn’t look bad either. The navy tie with white pin dots could possibly be from Tom Ford, but any number of brands could have provided this tie. There’s a folded white handkerchief in the jacket’s breast pocket to add to the Bond look. Craig’s shoes are black three-eyelet derbys with a chiselled toe and Dainite studded rubber soles. The shoes are likely the Crockett & Jones Highbury, which Craig wears in Skyfall.

GQ is also wrong about something other than the suit: Daniel Craig’s hair in Spectre. The longer hair in these photos gives Daniel Craig a more mature and sophisticated look, but if they looked at the Spectre trailer they would see that Craig’s hair in the film is the usual shorter length it has been in his other Bond films.

There are more photos GQ-Magazine.co.uk.