James Bond’s Dinner Jackets by Colour: Black, Midnight Blue and Ivory

Do you prefer James Bond in a black, midnight blue or ivory dinner jacket? The following infographic shows each colour of Bond’s dinner jackets (also known as Tuxedos) by film. Black and midnight blue dinner jackets make up part of a dinner suit with matching trousers, whereas ivory dinner jackets are worn with black trousers.

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Bullseye!: A Double-Breasted Grey Chalk Stripe Suit

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Roger Moore as Gerald Bradley-Smith, with Michael Caine

The 1990 Michael Winner film Bullseye! stars Roger Moore and Michael Caine as both a pair a nuclear physicists and a pair of con men who impersonate the physicists. It also features Roger Moore’s daughter Deborah Moore (credited as Deborah Barrymore) and Derren Nesbitt, whom shirtmaker Frank Foster said I resemble a younger version of. John Bloomfield is the costume designer. Though Moore and Caine shared the same tailor, Douglas Hayward, there isn’t a whole lot of Hayward’s tailoring in the film. Aquascutum is thanked in the credits for contributing suits, coats and raincoats for both Moore and Caine. Dormeuil, a French textile company, is also thanked in the credits, but their cloths may have been used for women’s clothing.

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Roger Moore as Sir John Bavistock

Roger Moore plays two characters in this film, Sir John Bavistock, a nuclear physicist, and Gerald Bradley-Smith, a conman who resembles Bavistock. In trying to impersonate Bavistock, Bradley-Smith purchases a suit identical to the double-breasted, dark grey chalk stripe suit Bavistock wears. The suit resembles the navy double-breasted suit made by Douglas Hayward that Roger Moore wears as James Bond in Octopussy, and this suit in Bullseye! was most likely made by Hayward.

Bradley-Smith picking out Bavistock's suit

Bradley-Smith picking out Bavistock’s suit

The double-breasted suit jacket has four buttons with one to button, which was a popular style in the 1980s and early 1990s. Though more fashionable brands usually paired this low keystone buttoning style with a low gorge (the seam where the collar meets the lapels), Hayward kept the gorge at a classic height. The jacket has soft shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a moderately full chest and a suppressed waist (as suppressed as Moore’s girthier figure can handle). The jacket has a very flattering cut and style for Moore’s body.

Roger Moore with Sally Kirkland, Deborah Moore and Derren Nesbitt

Roger Moore with Sally Kirkland, Deborah Moore and Derren Nesbitt

Moore’s suit jacket is detailed with flapped pockets, double vents and four buttons on each cuff. The suit trousers have medium-width straight legs with plain hems, side pockets and likely a flat or darted front.

There are two small details that make the Bullseye! suit’s jacket different from the Octopussy navy suit’s jacket. The jacket in Octopussy has three cuff buttons whilst the Bullseye! jacket has four cuff buttons. Also, the jacket in Octopussy has a buttonhole in each lapel, but the Bullseye! jacket only has a buttonhole in the left lapel. I’ve seen suit jackets from Hayward made in this era that match the details on this suit jacket, so it’s still most likely that Hayward made this suit.

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With the suit Moore wears a pale blue shirt that has a spread collar and double cuffs. The shirt is not made by Moore’s longtime shirtmaker Frank Foster due to its much shorter collar and link holes centred on the double cuffs instead of off-centred towards the fold. The regimental tie has stripes alternating red-navy-brown-navy, with the navy stripes slightly narrower than the others. This is the Winchester College tie, also known as the Old Wykehamist tie after the name for Winchester alumni. BIll Tanner wears the same tie with a similar suit in For Your Eyes Only. Moore knots the tie in a four-in-hand knot. He wears black shoes with the suit.

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Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes, Part 1

This week’s “Basted for Bond” infographic looks at the Tom Ford suits and coats that Daniel Craig wears in Quantum of Solace and Skyfall. This infographic details the differences between the “Regency” suit jacket from Quantum of Solace and the “O’Connor” suit jacket. Breakdowns of the navy overcoat and black greatcoat from Quantum of Solace and the navy topcoat from Skyfall are also included. A graphic for the Spectre clothes will come separately after the film is released.

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The Quiller Memorandum: A Dependable Grey Suit

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The popularity of the spy genre in the 1960s brought us the 1966 film The Quiller Memorandum. The character Qullier was originally written by novelist Elleston Trevor—under the pseudonym Adam Hall—as a British agent in the 1965 novel The Berlin Memorandum. In The Quiller Memorandum he is an American played by American actor George Segal, but he is still working for the British.

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The Quiller Memorandum has a few things in common with the James Bond series, including a John Barry score (which is very different from his Bond scores), a song sung by “From Russia With Love” singer Matt Monro, and a villain played by Max von Sydow (who played Blofed in the unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again). Though the film is not especially unique or interesting, the main character is well-dressed in a Bond-like manner. Like Cary Grant does in North By Northwest, George Segal wears a single suit throughout almost the entire film. Only in the final scene of the film does Segal change his clothes. But unlike in Northwest By Northwest, the suit in The Quiller Memorandum never has a chance to get cleaned.

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Though Quiller is an American in this film, the film was made in England and Germany, and George Segal is almost certainly wearing an English suit. Like Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, Segal’s suit has an unassuming look that is perfect for a spy. The suit is tailored in a Bond-like lightweight medium grey pick-and-pick wool and has a similar cut to Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, but with a few notable differences. The suits are similar in that jackets both button two and are cut with soft shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a full chest, a gently nipped waist and narrow lapels. Instead of the low button stance on Connery’s suit jackets, Segal’s suit jacket has a medium button stance.

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Segal’s suit jacket is cut with a slightly short length to reflect the contemporary trends, but the jacket is just long enough to cover his buttocks. It is detailed with jetted pockets, three cuff buttons and double vents. Black buttons contrast with the jacket. The suit trousers have an extended waistband with a hidden hook-and-eye closure, “Daks top” side adjusters with two buttons, slanted side pockets, front darts (positioned in front of the pockets) and straight legs with turn-ups.

Under the suit, Segal wears an ecru shirt with a point collar that has a lot of tie space, a front placket and rounded single-button cuffs. The cuff button is placed near the base of the cuff. The textured burgundy tie is very flattering to Segal’s warm spring complexion and blonde hair, and he ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Segal wears black lace-up shoes with his suit.

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George Segal wears clothes by On Her Majesty’s Secret Service tailor Dimi Major in the 1973 film A Touch of Class. The suit in The Quiller Memorandum shares a slight resemblance with Dimi Major’s cut, and the shoulders on Segal’s suits in A Touch of Class look identical to this suit’s shoulders. The Quiller suit lacks the fashionable flair that could be found on George Lazenby’s suits three years later, and though the shape of the jacket’s lapels is different, the trouser style is the same. There is a possibility that Dimi Major could have made this suit.

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Rittenhouse Costume Cards

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As many of you may know, Rittenhouse has sold “costume cards” of actual wardrobe clippings from the James Bond series. These include not only cards of James Bond’s clothes but of other characters as well, such as M, Mathis, Solange, Patrice, Silva and others. Most of these have been from clothes featured in Daniel Craig’s Bond films, but there have been cards from clothes throughout the series, including a piece of Sean Connery’s dinner suit in Dr. No. Many costume cards can be found on eBay, though the cards of Bond’s tie swatches are some of the most in-demand.

I own nine costume cards, including:

  1. The navy linen suit and blue end-on-end shirt from the black-and-white bathroom fight in Casino Royale.
  2. The grey linen Brioni suit and white self-stripe shirt from the Bahamas arrival in Casino Royale.
  3. The black Alfani shirt and mink Ted Baker trousers from the Bahamas poker scene in Casino Royale.
  4. The light blue poplin Brioni shirt worn with the navy track stripe suit from the final scene in Casino Royale.
  5. The pale blue Tom Ford shirt and navy pinstripe Tom Ford suit (with dirty trousers) from the opening scene of Quantum of Solace.
  6. The brown mohair tonic Tom Ford suit from the Bolivia arrival in Quantum of Solace.
  7. The black Tom Ford polo shirt and off-white Levi’s jeans from Quantum of Solace.
  8. The white Tom Ford shirt and midnight blue Tom Ford suit worn in Bolivia in Quantum of Solace.
  9. The light blue and charcoal grenadine-like tie worn with the charcoal rope stripe suit in Skyfall.

Which do you own?

Woven Tie Patterns

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Sean Connery, George Lazenby and Timothy Dalton wear mostly solid ties in their James Bond films, and Roger Moore wears solid, striped and printed ties in his James Bond films. Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig (until Spectre) have mostly eschewed the ties that their predecessors wore for ties with woven patterns. These often intricate patterns are woven on a Jacquard loom. When the pattern is woven, the colours will be more vivid and more defined than on printed ties. Though most striped ties are also woven with different coloured yarns rather than printed, this article will be focusing on other types of patterns than stripes.

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The first tie Bond wears that has a non-striped woven pattern is a navy tie with small white polka dots, He wears this tie with his navy double-breasted suit in Octopussy. Dots, from polka dots to pin dots, can be found both printed on and woven in ties, but woven dots are more vivid and defined.

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The plaid tie Roger Moore wears with his grey tweed jacket in A View to a Kill also has a woven pattern, but it’s woven just as any ordinary plaid for a jacket or shirt would be woven in an ordinary even twill weave. Though stripes and checks on ties appear diagonally, they are not woven into the cloth diagonally. Ties are cut on the bias (diagonally) so they hang straight and don’t curl in either direction, hence why patterns on ties are usually diagonal. If the ribs on a tie are horizontal or vertical, it usually means the tie is woven in a twill weave.

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Starting with GoldenEye, Bond has almost exclusively worn ties with woven patterns. In Pierce Brosnan’s Bond films the woven patterns vary from small to large. They range from small neat patterns and dots, to large chevrons and geometric patterns. The small neat patterns include the blue and bronze Turnbull & Asser tie that Bond wears with his vicuna-coloured overcoat and navy birdseye three-piece suit in Tomorrow Never Dies, the Herbie Frogg tie that Bond wears in the pipeline in The World Is Not Enough and the blue and yellow squares Turnbull & Asser tie that Bond wears on the plane with his navy birdseye suit in Die Another Day.

Some of Pierce Brosnan’s geometric ties include the black and gold tie in GoldenEye, the black tie with red, silver and gold lines and squares in The World Is Not Enough and the grey tie with blue circles in Die Another Day. The last two ties are from Turnbull & Asser. Though the weaving of these large patterns is very impressive, these are the furthest ties Bond has worn from the solid black knitted ties of his literary origins or the solid grenadine ties of his cinematic origins.

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Daniel Craig’s James Bond continues on from Brosnan’s by wearing mostly ties with woven patterns. Craig’s Bond, however, has preferred more discrete neat patterns, usually woven in two or three colours. His ties often have a basket weave appearance, but the patterns are created on a Jacquard loom with floated yarns that only mimic a basket weave. We see this basket weave look on the navy and white tie with the charcoal blue checked suit in Casino Royale, on the navy and white tie with the midnight blue suit in Quantum of Solace and on the navy and grey tie with the navy herringbone suit at the end of Skyfall.

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Many of the other ties that Daniel Craig’s Bond wears have other square patterns that look more complex than a basket weave. Craig’s other ties in his first three Bond films that don’t have a pattern of squares are the blue and white honeycomb tie with the three-piece navy pinstripe suit at the end of Casino Royale, the aubergine and black tie with white pin dots with the charcoal suit in Quantum of Solace, the oval-patterned tie at the end of Quantum of Solace and the two grenadine-esque ties in Skyfall. The ties in Quantum of Solace and Skyfall are made by Tom Ford.

Daniel Craig grey suit with grey rope stripes in Skyfall

The Suits of Ian Fleming’s James Bond Illustrated

Do you have a hard time picturing what the literary James Bond’s clothes may have looked like? I’ve taken the descriptions of Bond’s clothes and filled in the missing parts with details seen in pictures of Ian Fleming’s own clothes. Below you can see an approximation of how Ian Fleming intended his character to dress.

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Q’s History Through Ties

Desmond Llewelyn says in the Licence to Kill DVD commentary, “I wear a different tie every time, and I have sort of the history of Q worked out.” Llewelyn brought his own personal history and affiliations—including military, college and sports club—to the character of Q, also known as Major Boothroyd. Q actually does not wear a different tie every time, though his numerous regimental and club ties subtly give the character a more specific personal background than even James Bond has.

I have not been able to identify all the ties. Please comment below if you know what the unidentified ties represent and the article will be appended. You can click on the images to see them larger.

From Russia with Love

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The first time we see Desmond Llewelyn’s Q he is wearing a Brigade of Guards tie with his Prince of Wales suit. The Brigade of Guards tie has stripes in maroon and dark blue.

Goldfinger

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In the lab Q wears a Order Radleian Golf Club tie from Radley College with his brown tweed suit, which Llewelyn attended. The tie has red stripe with a narrower white stripe spaced below it.

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #1: In the opening scene in M’s office, Q wears a brown tie with rose and purple stripes. We get a much better look at this tie in Diamonds Are Forever.

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Q wears a light teal-grey textured tie at James Bond’s wedding. It is similar to Bond’s own tie.

Diamonds Are Forever

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Q wears an Order Radleian Golf Club tie in his lab, which he previously wears in Goldfinger.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #1: The brown tie with rose and purple stripes returns from the previous film, and we get a better look at it here. Q wears it in both the scene where Bond poses as Burt Saxby on the phone and at the casino.

The Man with the Golden Gun

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Q wears the Order Radleian Boat Club (Mariners) tie from Radley College when Bond meets him in the lab to examine the gold bullet and later in the second scene on the RMS Queen Elizabeth. The tie is black with a red stripe and thin white stripes spaced above and below the red stripe.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #2: In the first scene on the RMS Queen Elizabeth, Q wears a black tie with widely spaced pink stripes.

The Spy Who Loved Me

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The Brigade of Guards tie that Q first wears in From Russia with Love returns during Bond’s briefing and again at the end of the film.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #3: In Egypt and Sardinia, Q wears a red striped tie with white and black stripes. The stripes are in the reverse direction.

Moonraker

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The Order Radleian Golf Club from Goldfinger and Diamonds Are Forever returns for the third and final time in the M’s office scene in Moonraker.

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At the South American headquarters, Q wears a dark blue tie with a yellow stripe pattern. The stripes are in groups of three, with the middle stripe being narrower than the other two. Charles Day identified it as the 1st and 3rd Trinity College Boat Club Tie.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #5: At the end of Moonraker, Q wears a tie with wide pink and black stripes. We get another look at this tie in Licence to Kill.

For Your Eyes Only

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #6: In his lab, Q wears a navy or black tie with a triple stripe pattern in white, red and pink. The order of the three stripes reverses each repeat.

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The Order Radleian Boat Club from The Man with the Golden Gun returns in the final scene.

Octopussy

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #7: At the lab, Q wears a Navy tie with a white double-stripe pattern. Between each double-stripe is a white symbol.

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Q yet again wears the Brigade of Guards tie when piloting the hot air balloon

A View to a Kill

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Q wears a khaki knitted tie with morning dress, possibly to signify service in the Royal Artillery. RA officers wear a khaki knitted tie as part of their service dress. Otherwise, a casual knitted tie looks out of place with formal morning dress.

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At the end of A View to a Kill, Q wears his trusty Brigade of Guards tie.

The Living Daylights

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When he helps Koskov escape, Q once again wears a Brigade of Guards tie.

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In his lab with his three-piece Glen Urquhart check suit, Q wears a Newport Rugby Football Club. The tie is black with pairs of amber stripes, after the Newport RFC’s nickname, the “Black & Ambers”. The tie also has a motif of silver Prince of Wales’s feathers badges. The Prince of Wales’s feathers is a symbol of Wales that consists of three ostrich feathers emerging from a coronet. The tie also has a motif of red and green roses. Llewelyn played rugby for the club.

Licence to Kill

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Q is first seen in Bond’s hotel room wearing his Brigade of Guards tie.

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He wears a black tie as part of a chauffeur disguise.

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In one of Q’s scenes in Bond’s hotel room he wears a Guards Armoured Division tie. This navy tie has a motif of a white “ever open eye” inside the red outline of a shield. Llewellyn’s character in the 1950 Terence Young-directed film They Were Not Divided served in the Guards Armoured Division.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #8: Whilst assisting Bond on a boat, Q wears a navy tie with red, grey/grey-blue and white stripes. The stripes are in the reverse direction.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #5: The tie with wide black and pink stripes from the end of Moonraker returns.

GoldenEye

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GoldenEye features the seventh and final appearance—as well as the fifth consecutive appearance—of Q’s Brigade of Guards tie.

Tomorrow Never Dies

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As part of his disguise as an Avis car rental salesman “Quentin Quigley”, Q wears a black tie with printed red hexagon-like shapes and white lines. This tie is likely just part of the disguise and not relevant to Q’s background

The World Is Not Enough

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #9: When working on the Q boat, Q wears a navy tie with an unknown red motif.

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UNIDENTIFIED TIE #9: In his Scottish castle lab, Q wears a navy tie with a large yellow motif.

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In publicity stills for GoldenEye and The World Is Not Enough, Q wears a Royal Welch Fusiliers tie. It is a brighter red and blue than the Brigade of Guards tie, and the red stripes are twice as wide as the blue stripes. Llewelyn served in the Royal Welch Fusiliers during the Second World War.

Can anyone help identify the ten unidentified ties? Llewelyn mentioned a two ties in the Licence to Kill DVD commentary that are likely the ties that can’t be identified. One is for Trinity College of Cambridge, which Llewelyn attended. The other is for Malpas Cricket Club (MCC), for whom Llewelyn played cricket.