OK Connery: Neil Connery in Black Tie

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In 1967, Sean Connery’s younger brother Neil Connery starred in an Italian spy film called OK Connery, which is also known as Operation Kid Brother and Operation Double 007, amongst other titles. Neil Connery plays Dr. Neil Connery, who is the brother of a well-known British secret agent. The film features a number of actors who had appeared in the James Bond films, such as Daniela Bianchi (Tatiana Romanova in From Russia with Love), Adolfo Celi (Emilio Largo in Thunderball), Anthony Dawson (Professor Dent in Dr. No), Bernard Lee (M) and Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny). Neil Connery, who is dressed in lab coats, Scottish highland dress and dungarees in this film, also wears suits and sports coats with two buttons like his brother wears, but in shades of brown instead of greys and blues. Neil Connery’s most Bond-like outfit is his black dinner suit.

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Since OK Connery is an Italian production, Connery’s suits were most likely made by an Italian tailor. The single-button dinner jacket is cut with lightly padded straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The jacket has the traditional details of jetted pockets and no rear vent. The dinner jacket’s only concession to 1960s fashion is the narrow width of the silk-faced shawl collar. Unfortunately, the collar stands away from the neck in some shots, but that may be the fault of the way Connery donned the jacket rather than a problem with the fit. The too-long sleeves, however, are a problem with the fit. The trousers have medium-width tapered legs and likely have pleats.

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Connery’s white dress shirt has a short spread collar, double cuffs and a front bib with large pleats that fastens with shimmering mother-of-pearl studs. His narrow batwing bow tie is in black silk with crosswise ribs. Connery appears to be following his older brother’s style and foregoes a waist covering. Though his outfit is not perfect, he convincingly looks the part of James Bond’s younger brother.

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Marnie: Sean Connery’s Taupe Herringbone Suit

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For Alfred Hitchcock’s 1964 film Marnie, costume designer James Linn came up with varied wardrobe or suits and sports coats for Sean Connery to wear. For a large portion of the film, Connery wears a taupe suit quite unlike anything he wears as James Bond. Though Connery wears a few brown suits as James Bond, Bond’s are all in dark shades of brown. This suit is in a medium shade of taupe, which is a grey-brown. The name for the colour comes from the French taupe, a noun for the mole animal. A mole is dark grey-brown, and the colour is named after it.

Connery’s taupe suit is a heavy worsted wool woven in a herringbone weave with a white pinstripe bordering each repeat of the herringbone. This suit is what might be called a “town and country” suit, being neither completely a town suit nor a country suit. It is made in a worsted cloth, which is typically worn in town, and it has the details of a town suit, such as a vent-less rear and straight pockets. But taupe’s marginally warm tone brings it into the country. Since taupe is between grey and brown, it makes the transition nicely. Formality-wise, a taupe suit also fits between grey and brown.

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Taupe can be considered a neutral colour, but it has a slight warmth that is most flattering on people with a warm complexion. Sean Connery has a cool complexion and looks better in cooler greys than he does in a warmer taupe. However, Connery looks much better in taupe than he does in warmer and richer country browns. Taupe’s warmth reflects the country’s surroundings but is neutral enough to still look good on someone with a cool complexion. It is therefore an excellent compromise in the country for someone with a cool complexion. Likewise, it can also be a good compromise in the city for someone with a warm complexion because it is neutral enough to fit in amongst the greys of the city.

This suit is made in the same style as all of Connery’s other suits in Marnie, and the cuts of both the jacket and the trousers suggests an English tailor. The jacket is cut with a full chest and a gently suppressed waist. The shoulders are on the natural shoulder line with more padding than his suits in the Bond films have, and the shoulders have roped sleeveheads. The jacket buttons three with the lapels gently rolled over the top button, and it is detailed with flap pockets, three buttons on the cuffs and no vent. Connery briefly rides a horse in this suit, and the lack of vent does not make the task impossible. A vent, however, would likely have made Connery more comfortable on the horse.

Connery is bent forward, causing rumples at the waist

Connery is bent forward, causing rumples at the waist

The suit’s trousers have double forward pleats, a tapered leg with turn-ups, an extended waistband closure and button side tabs to adjust the waist. Instead of the tabs extending forward as they ordinarily do (like on Connery’s Bond suit trousers), these tabs extend rearward.

The cream shirt has a spread collar, front placket and single-button rounded barrel cuffs. The shirts resemble Frank Foster’s shirts, with a familiar collar shape and a placket stitched close to the center. Connery’s narrow tie is solid dark brown in a shiny satin weave, and it is tied in a windsor knot. The tie is held to his placket with a tie bar at the height of the jacket’s top button so it is just barely seen when the jacket is closed at the middle button. Connery’s shoes are medium brown derbys with an elongated and slightly squared toe. The shoes likely have double leather soles for extra durability in the country.

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James Bond and the Gauntlet (Turnback) Cuff

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Sean Connery’s dinner jacket in Dr. No

Before we are introduced to James Bond’s face in Dr. No, we first see his dinner jacket’s satin silk gauntlet cuffs. The gauntlet cuff, also known as a turnback cuff, is a turned back cuff at the end of the sleeve that extends approximately to the first button. It’s a subtle Edwardian detail that saw a resurgence in popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. The cuff is mostly decorative, but it can add unique character to one’s dinner jacket, suit jacket, odd jacket or overcoat.

There’s almost no restriction on what type of jacket or coat can have a gauntlet cuff. Some say it’s a sporty detail and should only be worn on sports coats and sporty suits. These people may prefer them on heavier cloths like tweeds and flannels because a heavier cloth gives the cuff more relief from the sleeve. Others only favour them on dinner jackets because the dinner jacket descended from the cuff-adorned smoking jacket or they may think the gauntlet cuff is too flashy to be on anything else. A gauntlet cuff can be appropriate on almost any jacket or coat, whether it’s light or heavy, whether it’s formal or informal, or whether it’s single-breasted or double-breasted. Tailcoats and frock coats historically have taken gauntlet cuffs, but the cuffs on those were made in a different style from the cuffs that Bond wears.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Daniel Craig’s’s dinner jacket in Quantum of Solace

James Bond creator Ian Fleming was a fan of gauntlet cuffs and often wore them on his jackets, from double-breasted suit jackets to country tweed jackets. He dressed a number of his characters in his James Bond stories in suit jackets with gauntlet cuffs, including Sir Hugo Drax in Moonraker, Wing Commander Rattray in “From a View to a Kill” and Dr. Fanshawe in “The Property of a Lady”, for whose dress he describes as “neo-Edwardian fashion”. Fleming uses the terms “turnback cuffs”, “turned-back cuffs” and “turned-up cuffs”, respectively.  Fleming also specified “two new suits with cuffs” for James Bond to wear disguised as Sir Hillary Bray in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Cuffs in this case still likely mean gauntlet cuffs, since a British person would probably not refer to trouser turn-ups as “cuffs” like an American would. Fleming never specified gauntlet cuffs on Bond’s own clothes, and the literary Bond would probably not have worn gauntlet cuffs considering the minimalist tendencies Fleming gave him.

In the films, James Bond has mostly worn gauntlet cuffs on his dinner jackets. Sean Connery’s midnight blue Anthony Sinclair dinner jacket in Dr. No and his similar dinner jacket in From Russia with Love have midnight blue satin silk gauntlet cuffs with four buttons. Roger Moore wears an off-white silk dinner jacket made by Cyril Castle with single-button self gauntlet cuffs in The Man with the Golden Gun. Daniel Craig brought back the gauntlet cuff on his Tom Ford midnight blue dinner jacket in Quantum of Solace, and this time the cuffs are are half gauntlet cuffs (more on this below) in black satin silk with five buttons. Though this dinner jacket was an homage to the original Dr. No dinner jacket, Tom Ford is a fan of gauntlet cuffs and has them on many of the dinner jackets in his line. Bond’s only piece with gauntlet cuffs that isn’t a dinner jacket is the Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield in Live and Let Die, also made by Cyril Castle. The cuffs on the chesterfield fasten with one button. David Niven wears gauntlet cuffs as Sir James Bond in the 1967 Casino Royale film, for which his clothes were made by Ian Fleming’s tailor Benson, Perry & Whitley.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Roger Moore’s dinner jacket in The Man with the Golden Gun

Cyril Castle made many jackets for Roger Moore with gauntlet cuffs before he was Bond, as Castle was Moore’s tailor for The Saint and The Persuaders television series. Most of Moore’s suit jackets and sports coats in the colour series of The Saint have gauntlet cuffs with a single button whilst the dinner jackets usually have gauntlet cuffs with three buttons. In The Persuaders, Roger Moore wears a striped double-breasted blazer with single-button gauntlet cuffs.

There are a number of different styles of gauntlet cuffs, including some that the buttons go through. Gauntlet cuffs are typically a separate piece laid on to the end of an ordinary sleeve, which is obvious in the case of silk cuffs on a dinner jacket. When in the same cloth as the rest of the jacket, they are still typically made from a separate piece and not just folded back. It’s not impossible to have a cuff that is folded back, but if there’s a pattern it will not match. There are other types of cuffs on a jacket or coat, but James Bond only wears the kind that are laid on separately. Gauntlet cuffs work best on narrow sleeves, whereas on wide sleeves they may look or feel too heavy.

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Gauntlet Cuffs on Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield coat in Live and Let Die

All of Bond’s gauntlet cuffs have an elegant curved shape—they all curve out of the way of the first cuff button—but there are slight differences in the way the cuffs are styled. Connery’s cuffs starts at the corners of the cuff’s opening and look the most integrated with the sleeve of all of Bond’s cuff designs. Moore’s cuffs start in from the corner to line up with the center of the button, so the corner of the sleeve opening can be tucked under the opposite end of the gauntlet cuff (Moore leaves the corner of the sleeve untucked). These cuffs, however, look less integrated with the sleeve than Connery’s do. Craig’s cuffs are only half gauntlet cuffs, in which the cuffs wrap around only the outside of the arm. They end at and are sewn into the seam at the front of the arm. The inside of the arm isn’t seen much, but this kind of cuff seems like a shortcut when compared to a full gauntlet cuff.

Comparing the cuffs: Anthony Sinclair, left; Cyril Castle, middle; Tom Ford, right

Comparing the cuffs: Anthony Sinclair, left; Cyril Castle, middle; Tom Ford, right

Though gauntlet cuffs are mostly decorative, they have one practical purpose: they protect the end of the sleeve. When worn out, the gauntlet cuff can be removed to reveal an unworn sleeve edge under the cuff. When made in contrasting silk on a dinner jacket, the cuff can be replaced. Half gauntlet cuffs, however, do not protect the full edge of the sleeve and are even more decorative than the full gauntlet cuff. All this said, the protective advantage to gauntlet cuffs is only beneficial on overcoats. The ends of the sleeves on dinner jackets, suit jackets and sports coats should not wear out because one’s shirt sleeves should be a little longer than one’s jacket sleeves to protect the jacket sleeves.

The Saint: A Blue Tweed Jacket

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For the first color series production of The Saint, Roger Moore takes full advantage of the color and wears a steel blue tweed sports coat made by his usual tailor Cyril Castle. Moore first wears this jacket in the fifth series episode “The Man Who Liked Lions” and later during the fifth series in “The Persistent Patriots” and “The Fast Women”. He wears it in two sixth series episodes, “The Fiction Makers” and “The House on Dragon’s Rock” that were actually part of the fifth series production. It is worn the most in “The House on Dragon’s Rock”, and the outfit Moore wears with it is what is featured in this article. The episode first aired on 24 November 1968.

Moore’s tweed is woven in a twill weave with a blue ground and has white flecks. It looks similar to a donegal tweed, but donegal is woven in a plain weave rather than a twill. Blue tweeds are somewhat unorthodox, being a country cloth in a city colour. Tweeds are traditionally in earthy colours—the brown and green families—or in neutral greys. Because a blue tweed jacket is an anomaly, a blue tweed jacket must be worn carefully. In the country, it should be avoided in autumn when browns completely dominate nature. In the country in winter it can fit in with the snow so long as the blue is muted. In spring, however, any blue can look good anywhere. Though tweeds aren’t traditionally worn in the city, a blue tweed jacket is a solid choice for casual wear amongst the concrete and steel.

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This jacket is Moore’s only jacket with two buttons in the entire run of The Saint, apart from an unfortunate ivory dinner jacket with two buttons that he wears in the early episodes of the series. Compared to his typical button three jackets from The Saint, this button two jacket makes Moore look less top-heavy and more balanced. The jacket is cut with a swelled chest and a closely nipped waist for an athletic look. The shoulders are lightly padded with roped sleeveheads, but the shoulders look more built-up than they are due to the heavy tweed. The jacket is detailed with double vents, single-button gauntlet (turnback) cuffs and straight flap pockets with a ticket pocket. The jacket has swelled edges on the lapels, the collar, the front edge, the pocket welt and flaps and the gauntlet cuffs. The jacket’s buttons are black horn, though brown horn would have been a more fitting choice due to the rustic look and warm tones Moore wears with the jacket.

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A close look at both sides of the jacket’s gauntlet cuffs—or turn back cuffs—from “The House on Dragon’s Rock”. The gauntlet cuff is a separate piece attached to the cuff.

In “The House on Dragon’s Rock”, Moore wears this jacket with medium grey flannel trousers that have a darted front, frogmouth pockets and straight legs. In some other episodes he wears tan twill trousers with this jacket, and almost any neutral trousers can pair well with a steel blue jacket. All shades of grey can work, from a light ash to a deep charcoal. Though black trousers won’t clash with this jacket, they will make the blue pop in a bold way, whilst charcoal trousers will give a similar look that is softer and more elegant. Anything in the brown family can work, from a light beige to a dark chocolate. Though cream and white trousers wouldn’t necessarily go with a cool-weather tweed jacket, they would be perfect with a steel blue linen or silk jacket in warm weather. Olive trousers, though often considered neutral, don’t work so well with a blue jacket. As triadic colours, blue and olive compete with each other when there are large amounts of both colours.

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Moore’s ecru shirt has a moderate spread collar, plain front and double cuffs. The narrow tie has wide brick red and grey stripes separated by narrow black stripes in the classic British direction, and it is tied in a four-in-hand knot. Moore’s shoes are dark brown short chelsea boots.

Jim Fanning: Navy Worsted Flannel Suit and Bow Tie

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Douglas Wilmer, who played Jim Fanning in Octopussy, died Thursday at the age of 96. Wilmer was best known for playing Sherlock Holmes in the 1965 television series, but he made a lasting impression to James Bond fans in his brief role alongside Roger Moore in Octopussy. Wilmer also appeared with Roger Moore in an episode of The Saint titled “The Rough Diamonds” and filmed a scene for—but was cut from—Sean Connery’s film Woman of Straw.

Wilmer’s character Fanning in Octopussy is an art expert employed by MI6 who is excited about the auction he attends with Bond, but he’s quickly frustrated by Bond’s antics. His old-fashioned and relaxed outfit is stylish and detail-focused, and it perfectly suits the character.

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Fanning’s light navy lightweight worsted flannel suit is made in a soft drape cut that suggests an Anderson & Shepard inspiration. It’s certainly a bespoke suit, and it’s likely Douglas Wilmer’s own suit from his personal tailor. It’s unlikely the film would budget for a bespoke suit for such a minor character. The suit has a worn-in look, which would be appropriate for an older gentleman who has likely had this suit for two decades.

This suit jacket’s drape cut is characterized by soft and slightly extended shoulders with light wadding and by a full chest with vertical folds at the side. The waist is suppressed, but how much so cannot be determined from an unbuttoned jacket. The jacket’s soft construction allows the narrow fishmouth lapels to roll gently over the top of the jacket’s three buttons, but the actual lapels start at the top button. The fishmouth shape of the lapels suggests that this jacket is likely not from Anderson & Sheppard, despite the rest of it resembling their style. Still, Anderson & Sheppard could be a possibility. The jacket is detailed with straight flap pockets and two buttons spaced apart on the cuffs, and there is no vent in the rear.

The details of the suit trousers cannot be seen clearly, but the trousers likely have double forward pleats and are worn with braces. They have a medium-long rise to the waist.

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Fanning’s light grey and white narrow-striped shirt follows the traditional English design. Whilst solid grey shirts can look very dull and bland, the fine stripes on this shirt give it a livelier appearance. The collar is a wide spread with a little tie space and stitched a 1/4-inch from the edge. The front has a narrow placket identical to Turnbull & Asser’s and is stitched 3/8-inch from the edge. The cuffs are double cuffs.

The bow tie is navy with a woven pattern of large tics, each made up of a green tic, a yellow tic and a red tic. Unlike James Bond’s perfectly tied black bow ties, Fanning’s bow tie is left askew. The back and front don’t perfectly line up, giving the bow tie some character. He accessorises his suit with a white linen handkerchief stuffed into his breast pocket with the corners sticking up. Reading glasses hang from Fanning’s neck on a thin red lanyard whilst a magnifying glass hangs from a thicker black lanyard.

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M: The Blue Chalk Stripe Suit in Spectre

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Timothy Everest tailored a slightly more modern wardrobe for Ralph Fiennes to wear as M in Spectre than he did for him in Skyfall. The most modern of these suits is the only single-breasted suit fully seen in the film: a two-piece navy worsted flannel with an electric blue chalk stripe. Since a blue chalk stripe doesn’t have as much contrast with navy as a white stripe would, the “electric” description is a little lost. Fiennes wears a similar three-piece suit in Skyfall, Sean Connery wears a navy suit with a blue chalk stripe in Diamonds Are Forever and Daniel Craig wears a navy suit with a blue stripe in Quantum of Solace.

M’s suit jacket is a button two and has a classic English cut with straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a full chest, nipped waist and medium-width lapels. The jacket is detailed with slanted pockets, a ticket pocket, double vents and four buttons on the cuffs. The edges are finished with subtle pick stitching, and the buttons are dark horn with a four-hole domed centre.

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The suit trousers have a plain front, slanted side pockets and medium-width tapered legs with turn-ups. The waistband has a three-inch square tab extension with a hidden clasp closure and slide-buckle side adjusters. The rear has two tabs for the braces to attach to, which raises the back of the braces like a fishtail back would to make the braces more comfortable. M reveals the black leather tabs of his braces when he pushes the jacket open by placing his hands in his pockets. Opening the jacket also reveals the trousers’ traditional rise to the waist.

Spectre has proven to be the James Bond film of short trousers. Bond’s suit trousers are noticeably short, and so are M’s. M’s trousers just barely touch his shoes, though there is a slight break in front. The trousers overall are not hanging cleanly, and this is likely a result of the braces not sitting properly over Fiennes’ shoulders or wearing the trousers higher than they were meant to be. If a gentleman is going to wear his trousers too short, the trousers should at least have a narrow leg like Bond’s trousers have. M’s trousers don’t have wide legs by any means, but they are wide enough to flap around when too short. Braces typically ensure that the trousers always hang from the proper height, but when the braces aren’t adjusted properly we might see this.

With this suit, M wears a sky blue shirt with a spread collar, plain front and double-cuffs. The tie is a subdued neat pattern of navy squares on navy. Each square has a small white dot in its centre. His shoes are black cap-toe oxfords, the standard shoe for a city suit.

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M’s outfit is traditional but is neither old fashioned nor outdated. Foregoing the braces and cutting the suit just slightly closer to the body would make it completely appropriate for Bond to wear. M’s suit is still quite traditional compared to the trendier looks Timothy Everest often tailors. It’s rather a shame M keeps the jacket open the entire scene, so we are deprived of seeing the beauty of the bespoke cut in all its glory.

How James Bond Looks Masculine and Sophisticated in His Suits

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Nobody else combines masculinity and sophistication in the way that James Bond does. The masculinity comes from looking as much like the ideal man from the western perspective. This ideal man’s body is lean, strong and overall athletic. it is tall with broad shoulders, a muscular chest and small waist. The ideal man’s torso has a V-shape, which is masculine because it’s not a common shape for women to have. The sophistication comes from a well-tailored suit. A well-tailored suit can give man a more masculine shape, can show off a masculine figure or can downplay a masculine figure. All three of these aspects of tailoring can be desirable, depending on the body type one has. This article focuses on the suits that Bond wears that best deal with a masculine but elegant silhouette.

Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits emphasise his masculine physique whilst downplaying some aspects of it. Connery doesn’t need much help in the shoulders, and his jackets have soft shoulders that follow his shoulder line but have a little structure to smooth out the shoulders to give them more elegant lines. The chest has a full, swelled shape to build on the strength in the chest. There are two buttons on the front of the jacket in a low stance to create a deep “V” on the front of the jacket to highlight Connery’s masculine shape.

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Because Sean Connery had a very athletic physique, Anthony Sinclair decided to soften it by not making the waist as suppressed as he normally would. A tightly suppressed wasp waist in the normal Savile Row fashion with Sean Connery’s fabled 13-inch drop would look neither elegant nor manly. The waist on Connery’s jackets is still very shaped, but it’s not tight. Too much waist suppression can make one look feminine, and stressing an overly athletic physique detracts from the elegance of a suit by making someone look too much like a body builder.

I find that Sean Connery’s narrow lapels in the 1960s also help drawn attention to his large chest. Narrow lapels make the chest look wider by showing more expanse of chest. Connery’s considerably wider lapels in Diamonds Are Forever cover two-thirds of his chest, giving him a visually narrower chest.

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For the slighter Bonds Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan, large shoulders on their jackets give them a stronger look. If they wore suits with natural shoulders they wouldn’t have the necessary imposing look that an action hero needs. The shoulders on many of Dalton’s suit jackets, however, were too strong and draw too much attention to themselves. Brosnan’s Brioni suits, however, gave him a more natural look that was still built-up. Additionally, the two buttons in a low stance on Dalton’s suits, like on Connery’s, give him a more athletic look by drawing attention to the chest.

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Daniel Craig takes a different approach to looking masculine and strong in his suits. Whilst Connery’s suits work with his body, Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall fight against his body. They have the goal to make him look like he worked out so much that his muscles are bursting out of his suit. He wears suits meant for someone with a 38-inch chest and more likely has a chest around 40 inches. Narrow shoulders on the jackets allow Craig’s deltoids to push the sleeves out a little. A too-small chest splays open to give the impression Craig’s chest muscles are bigger. Ripples at the waist further the impression that Craig is turning into the Hulk. Unlike Connery’s method of looking stronger, Craig’s method is devoid of elegance and sophistication. Clean lines, not ripples, are a mark of refinement.

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Craig’s method also does not achieve its goal to make him look more muscular. Suits—particularly Tom Ford’s—are very structured and can’t stretch like a t-shirt or jumper to show off the form of his muscles. Knitted, not woven, garments are best used to show off one’s body. A suit that is too small ripples and pulls the same way whether one is too muscular or too fat for it. And putting Craig in a suit that is too small for him has the effect of making him look smaller, not bigger. This method would work better with someone who is genuinely more imposing with a chest much larger than Craig’s 40 inches. Narrow shoulders downplay his breadth and the V-shape of his torso. The short jacket length makes his torso look smaller overall. The positive effect of a short jacket length, however, is that it makes Craig look taller in wide shots by extending the perceived length of his legs. That’s the one way his suits in Skyfall make him look more masculine. However, the lower rise on his trousers partially negates the height benefits of the shorter jackets by shortening his lower half. The suits in Spectre mostly have the same problems but to a lesser extent than in Skyfall. The shoulders in Spectre are wider in comparison to Craig’s body and allow the sleeves to hang more elegantly.

Like on Connery’s 1960s suits, most of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall and Spectre have narrow notched lapels that make Craig’s chest look larger. But one of Craig’s suits in Spectre has wide peaked lapels: the black herringbone Tom Ford “Windsor” suit. These wide peaked lapels have a different effect from wide notched lapels. Peaked lapels point up and out, extending the width of the chest and shoulders. The belly of the lapels added perceived depth to the chest. Wide notched lapels with a higher and more horizontal gorge, as well as some belly, can counter the narrowing effect of wide lapels.

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Though the right tailoring can make a man look more masculine or more sophisticated, clothes can not add the attitude, charisma and personality needed to truly be like James Bond.

A Suede Jacket and Mock Polo Neck for Spectre’s Climax

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During Spectre’s climax in London, James Bond wears a “marine” navy “Racer Jacket” from John Varvatos. The jacket is made of goat suede and has a two-way zip-front that can open from both the top and the bottom. The sleeves have a zip gauntlet to allow the hand to fit through the narrow sleeves. The front and back are each made of two pieces, and the front has darts at the sides for a trimmer fit. There are side-access pockets at the base of each front dart. The jacket is fully lined.

Under the jacket Bond wears a dark charcoal grey fine gauge mock turtleneck from British company N.Peal made of a blend of 70% cashmere and 30% silk. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. This jumper has a close fit that shows off Daniel Craig’s body much better than a suit does.

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On the teaser poster for Spectre we see the jumper without the jacket, where Bond’s shoulder holster is revealed. This look immediately recalls the 1973 film Live and Let Die, in which Roger Moore wears a black full polo neck with black trousers and shoulder holster. In turn, Roger Moore’s look was inspired by Steve McQueen in Bullitt, and Daniel Craig’s wardrobes also often take much inspiration directly from McQueen. Craig’s updated dark grey version better flatters his fair complexion than Roger Moore’s black polo neck does, though McQueen’s blue polo neck would be a great look on Daniel Craig.

The trousers are from Neil Barrett and have a flat front with frogmouth pockets. The trousers are black with a grey tic pattern of large tics made up of tiny tics in a blend of viscose, nylon, polyester and elastane. The legs are narrow and tapered, but the elastane content makes the narrow legs wearable. Bond wears the trousers with a belt, though because the scenes are so dark it is difficult to tell if the belt is black or brown. Because Bond wears brown boots with the outfit, a brown belt would be the ideal choice, and dark brown wouldn’t break up the outfit too much.

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Speaking of boots, Bond’s are the Sanders & Sanders “Hi-Top” chukka boots, also known as the “Playboy” chukka boots. The boots are snuff suede with a two-eyelet closure, a full leather lining and crepe soles. Crepe soles are associated more with the desert boot, the chukka boot’s brother. Crepe soles are made of coagulated rubber and are very soft and comfortable and fantastic for the desert, but they’re not a good choice for the city. On pavement they absorb all of the filth, and in the rain they become very slippery. The sides of the soles do not look pretty as they wear. And as the soles age they harden, crack and lose their spongy comfort. The “Playboy” chukka boots are something directly inspired by Steve McQueen, which he wears with his polo neck in Bullitt.

Read more about James Bond’s relationship with the turtleneck/polo neck over the years.