Street People: A Familiar Tan Cotton Suit

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Sean Connery’s suits in Goldfinger aren’t the only clothes to have been worn by a James Bond actor in a previous non-Bond film. In Connery’s case, many of his clothes in Goldfinger were originally made for Woman of Straw. During Roger Moore’s longest break between Bond films, he made an Italian film called Street People in 1976. Though Street People was released half a year before filming in Egypt began for The Spy Who Loved Me, a certain cotton suit jacket from Roger Moore’s Street People wardrobe was reused. That cotton jacket is the tan jacket with safari details that Moore wears in the Cairo and Giza scenes in The Spy Who Loved Me.

In Street People, the cotton jacket was part of a tan suit with matching trousers, possibly made by Angelo Roma, Moore’s tailor at the time. In most cases, suit jackets don’t work well without the matching trousers, but the casual cotton material as well as the sporty safari details make this jacket work well on its own. It may even work better with the stoned-coloured trousers that Moore wears it with in The Spy Who Loved Me. In Street People, the details on the jacket are brought to attention more by the wearing trousers that don’t distract from the jacket (not that the trousers in The Spy Who Loved Me are distracting).

The suit gets soaked.

The suit gets soaked.

Tan is one of the best colours for a cotton suit since it looks great for warmer weather and fits the suit’s casual material. Tan also looks great with Roger Moore’s warm tan complexion and golden brown hair.

The structured suit jacket could have been made by Angelo Roma since the silhouette is similar to the other suit jackets that Roger Moore wears in both The Spy Who Loved Me and in Street People. It has a clean, trim cut with straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads and a suppressed waist. If the wide lapels don’t make the jacket look dated, the safari-esque details do. It has shoulder straps, a belted back with a deep single vent, belted sleeves, patch hip pockets with flaps and a set-in breast pocket with a flap. The jacket has swelled edges all over to reinforce the garment.

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Differing from Roger Moore’s typical suit jackets at the time, the lapels have a slight fishmouth shape and the front quarters are cut closed with the bottom corners only a little rounded. The closed, straight quarters give this jacket a more military look that goes with the safari details. The jacket’s brown buttons are probably made from the Tagua nut which comes from the seed of a tropical palm and is similar to ivory. These buttons are also known as corozo and are commonly used by Italian makers for suit buttons since they can be dyed in colours to match the suit. In brown they go especially well with the safari jacket look.

The suit trousers are similar to the Angelo Roma suit trousers that Roger Moore wears in The Spy Who Loved Me. They have a flat front, no belt loops and wide, flared legs. They differ from Moore’s trousers in his Bond films by having turn-ups. The turn-ups are approximately two inches, but they don’t look so tall because the bottoms of the trouser legs are so wide. Ordinary 1 1/2 inch turn ups would look very short on such a wide hem. Despite the suit being one of the most fashion-forward items Roger Moore has ever worn, it is well tailored and creatively tailored.

Notice the turn-ups on the trousers

Notice the turn-ups on the trousers

Moore wears this suit either with a open-neck cobalt blue shirt or a dark brown polo neck jumper. The cobalt blue shirt has a long point collar, a front placket and cocktail cuffs with a rounded and contoured shape. The shirt is made by Frank Foster. The contoured shape of the cuffs is different from the straighter cocktail cuff design that Foster made for The Man with the Golden Gun and Moonraker before and after this film, respectively, but Foster used to experiment more with cocktail cuff shapes. The collar and collar band shapes on this shirt are very similar to the collars Foster made for The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, but this collar is a little shorter. The shirt’s buttons are shiny medium blue and possibly made of shell. Moore wears the collar button as well as the first three buttons below the collar open. The buttons are spaced a little closer together and higher than on an ordinary shirt, but it’s still a lot of buttons to have open and looks a bit sleazy.

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The dark brown ribbed polo neck jumper must be lightweight to be comfortable in the seemingly warm weather in this film. However, even a lightweight jumper looks too heavy to wear with a light cotton suit.

With the suit, Moore wears dark brown socks, except for one shot where light brown socks are visible. His shoes are chestnut brown square-toe slip-ons. Briefly he wears a pair of large plastic oval sunglasses.

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A Guide to Bond’s Pinstripes and Chalk Stripes

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Since From Russia with Love, striped suits have been a staple of James Bond’s wardrobe. There are many different kinds of stripes for suits, including pinstripes, chalk stripes and variations on those stripes, such as bead stripes, rope stripes, track stripes, multi-stripes, shadow stripes, self stripes and more. There are not universally accepted definitions for all of these different stripes, but suiting stripes are defined purely on the appearance of the stripe and not how far they are spaced apart. James Bond has worn all of these different types of stripes, with the chalk stripes being the most common.

Pinstripes

A pinstripe is a stripe that is very fine but usually well-defined. Alan Flusser writes in Dressing the Man that pinstripes are “fine stripes the width of a pin scratch resulting from the use of white, gray, or other yarns in a series in the warp of a worsted fabric.” Hardy Amies writes in ABC of Men’s Fashion that pinstripes “are really a series of dots”. These two definitions aren’t exactly the same, but they aren’t at odds with each other either.

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Pierce Brosnan wears a dark charcoal suit with grey pinstripes in The World Is Not Enough

Pinstripes are often woven into the cloth separately from the background weave on a Dobby loom rather than as simply part of the background weave. In those cases the pinstripe isn’t one or two of every twenty to forty or so yarns in the weave, but it’s added to the cloth in on top of the base colour. This helps makes the pinstripe more defined and keeps it from blurring into the cloth. These kinds of pinstripes are often made of silk or mercerised cotton instead of wool so they stand out even more. A variation on the pinstripe is the bead stripe, also called a beaded pinstripe or a rain pinstripe, which looks like a line of tiny beads spaced apart. These can be either one or two yarns wide. On some pinstripes, two yarns of beads alternate above and below to create a more continuous pinstripe. This kind of stripe is what tailor Richard Anderson calls a “true” pinstripe in his book Bespoke: Savile Row Ripped and Smoothed.

A single-yarn pinstripe woven as part of the warp in a twill weave can also have a bead effect since the twill wales break the stripe. These single-yarn pinstripes that are part of the background weave don’t stand out as much as the kind described above and often can’t be seen clearly from a distance. When woven into the cloth, a stripe that is two yarns wide can look either like a pinstripe or a chalk stripe depending on the weave and type of cloth. In these cases the stripe could fairly be called either a pinstripe or a chalk stripe.

The track stripe is a variation where the pinstripes come in groupings of two or three, with the stripes in each grouping spaced one or two yarn’s width apart.

Chalk Stripes

A chalk stripe is woven two to five yarns wide and resembles the lines of a tailor’s chalk, hence the name. Chalk stripes are woven as part of the warp of the weave, which makes the stripes less defined than typical pinstripes. Amies describes the difference, “‘pin’ stripes … look very ‘set’ when compared to ‘chalk’ stripes, the outlines of which are blurred and thus blend with the background.”

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Sean Connery wears a navy flannel suit with grey chalk stripes in From Russia with Love

Chalkstripes, especially in wider spacings, are less formal than pinstripes. Chalk stripes are woven as two to four yarns of every forty or so yarns. A true chalk stripe is a stripe on a flannel cloth, which gives it a blurry appearance that resembles chalk. Wider stripes on worsted suitings can also be called chalk stripes. On a plain weave a chalk stripe has a pebbled effect and may be called a pearl chalk stripe. On a twill weave the diagonal wales make diagonal breaks in the stripe. This kind of chalk stripe mimics the look of twisted rope, and consequently this stripe is called a rope stripe or a cable stripe.

Worsted suits with stripes are best worn in a business setting, especially in the darkest of charcoal and navy worsteds. Riccardo Villarosa and Giuliano Angeli write in The Elegant Man, “It seems as if the design on the fabric of a pinstriped suit was inspired by the lines in accounting books. In reality, continuous or dotted lines be traced to the lines of the trousers worn with a morning coat, which was very popular in London during the first half of the century.” Pinstripes, however, do resemble the lines in ledger books more than they resemble the much bolder stripes of trousers worn with a morning coat, and thus they look most appropriate in a business setting. Flannel chalk stripes, on the other hand, can work well in social settings, especially when in lighter shades of charcoal and navy. Pinstripes and chalk stripe cloths are best made up as suits and not as odd jackets or trousers. Pinstripes and chalk stripes look too serious enough to wear outside of a suit, and they look best when they can continue from the shoulders down to feet.

James Bond’s Striped Suits

James Bond’s first striped suit is in From Russia with Love, and it is navy flannel with wide-spaced grey chalk stripes (pictured above under the “Chalk Stripes” header). The grey stripes don’t stand out as much as white chalk stripes would, but it is overall a very classic chalk stripe suit. This suit works well in Venice in a non-office setting because the flannel cloth and wider stripe spacing make this suit less formal than the typical striped suit.

This dark brown suit in Goldfinger has subtle shadow stripes

This dark brown suit in Goldfinger has subtle shadow stripes

Bond’s second striped suit is a brown shadow stripe suit worn in the Fort Knox scene in Goldfinger. Shadow stripes are created in two ways, either by a variation in the weave—woven on a dobby loom—in the same colour as the background of the suit or by using darker yarns. When the stripe is the same colour as the background of the suit it can also be called a self stripe. Shadow stripes can be any thickness, from one yarn to many more than a chalkstripe. Bond’s suit in Goldfinger has a stripe most likely two yarns wide.

Bond wears a navy chalk stripe suit to the office in On Her Majesty's Secret Service

Bond wears a navy chalk stripe suit to the office in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, James Bond starts a long tradition of wearing striped suits in London along with a tradition of three-piece suits. The suit in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service is navy flannel with white chalk stripes in a narrower spacing than on the suit in From Russia with Love. The narrower spacing gives the traditional chalkstripe a more modern and slightly more formal look. Narrower spacing between stripes became more popular in the 1960s, and Roger Moore wore suits with stripes spaced much closer than this throughout The Saint.

Sean Connery wear a navy suit with blue chalk stripes in Diamonds Are Forever

Sean Connery wear a navy suit with blue chalk stripes in Diamonds Are Forever

In Diamonds Are Forever, Bond visits Blofeld’s oil rig dressed for business in a navy suit with blue chalk stripes. Chalk stripes on worsted suitings are fairly bold when in white, but since these stripes are medium blue they don’t have so much contrast with the suit’s background. Blue stripes are an effective way to wear stripes without the fear of making too bold of a statement in stripes. However, in some settings blue stripes may be seen as too fashionable compared to the bolder, yet more traditional, white stripes.

Roger Moore's first chalk stripe suit is grey with white stripes

Roger Moore’s first chalk stripe suit in The Man with the Golden Gun is grey with white stripes

In The Man with the Golden Gun, Roger Moore continues the tradition started in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service of wearing stripes in London. Moore’s suit is a double-breasted medium grey flannel with white chalk stripes. Medium and lighter greys are not as popular in London as dark greys are, and consequently this suit has a less business-like appearance. This suit could just as easily be worn for a daytime social occasion, but the colour is too light to wear in the evening. Later in The Man with the Golden Gun, Bond wears an olive multi-stripe double-breasted suit out at night in Hong Kong. A multi-stripe pattern has a series of stripes in different weights or colours. The olive suit in The Man with the Golden Gun has both different weights and different colours, with a series of very closely-spaced tan pinstripes between wider-spaced red chalk stripes. Multi-stripes are the least serious of all suit stripes and function better for social occasions than for business.

The pinstripes on Roger Moore's office suit in Moonraker are so close together that they can only be seen clearly in this close-up shot

The pinstripes on Roger Moore’s office suit in Moonraker are so close together that they can only be seen clearly in this close-up shot

The next time Bond visits the office is in Moonraker, and once again he wears a striped suit. This time it’s a navy pinstripe suit, and the pinstripes are spaced so close together that they dull and lighten the navy from a distance and thus make the suit look blue-grey. The suit has about six pinstripes per inch.

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Roger Moore wears a navy chalk stripe suit in For Your Eyes Only

Bond returns to more traditional styles of clothing in For Your Eyes Only, and in his visit to the office he once again wears a striped three-piece suit. And just as Sean Connery and George Lazenby wore before, Roger Moore wears a navy chalk stripe suit. This suit is worsted flannel, so the stripe is more defined than it is on Connery’s and Lazenby’s fuzzier woollen flannel suits. Moore continues wearing a striped three-piece suit to office in Octopussy, but this time it’s a worsted dark grey twill rope stripe, a more defined variant of the chalk stripe. A View to a Kill is Roger Moore’s only Bond film in which he does not wear a striped suit to the office.

Timothy Dalton wears a navy suit with grey chalk stripes in The Living Daylights

Timothy Dalton wears a navy suit with grey chalk stripes in The Living Daylights

TImothy Dalton’s Bond continues the tradition of wearing a striped three-piece suit to the office in The Living Daylights with a navy suit with narrow-spaced grey chalk stripes. Though the grey stripes are thick and spaced close together, being grey prevents them from looking overbearing. After The Living Daylights Bond does not wear a striped suit again for twelve years. The next striped suit comes in The World Is Not Enough, when Bond wears a dark charcoal three-piece suit with subtle grey pinstripes to the office (pictured above under the “Pinstirpes” header). The grey stripes on this suit are of the “bead stripe” variety.

Daniel Craig wears a navy suit with track stripes in Casino Royale

Daniel Craig wears a navy suit with track stripes in Casino Royale

Every Bond film that follows The World Is Not Enough has Bond wearing a striped suit. Die Another Day sees Bond wearing a suit in dark grey with light grey pinstripes. Bond even wears two navy pinstripe suits in Casino Royale: a suit on the train with narrow-spaced, hardly seen grey pinstripes and a three-piece suit with slightly wider-spaced light grey double track stripes in Italy. This is the first film since Sean Connery’s Bond films that Bond wears striped suits outside of London, but he wears them to show he is in a business mindset. In Quantum of Solace, Bond wears a navy suit with blue pinstripes. These stripes are three yarns wide, with the three yarns creating horizontally arranged series of dots. I consider the stripes on this suit pinstripes rather than chalk stripes because the yarns are very fine and make up narrow stripes of pin dots. These stripes are spaced a half-inch apart.

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

Bond’s latest striped suit in a fancy charcoal rope stripe suit in Skyfall. The charcoal suiting is in a twill weave, as is necessary for a rope stripe, except on either side of each grey rope stripe there is a plain-woven section framing the stripe, hence the “fancy” part. With the exception of Skyfall, Bond’s striped suits in recent years have tended more towards pinstripes than chalk stripes.

Daniel Craig wears a charcoal suit with grey rope stripes in Skyfall

Daniel Craig wears a charcoal suit with grey rope stripes in Skyfall

More Spectre Filming in London

Spectre London Tom Ford Suit

Spectre has been filming in London as of late, and James Bond is appropriately dressed for the city in a grey pinstripe suit and “Crombie” coat. There are many photos at Daily Mail. The Tom Ford suit is a combination of styles from Quantum of Solace and Skyfall, but it’s also something new. The suit is dark grey with narrow-spaced white pinstripes, which makes the suit look medium grey overall.

The suit jacket goes back to the Quantum of Solace buttoning arrangement of three buttons with the lapels rolled to the middle button. The lapels are narrow, but not overly so. The shoulders are straight with a little padding, the chest is clean and the waist is very suppressed, with only a little pulling at the button. The fit is much cleaner than the fit in Skyfall. The jacket has a single vent and slightly slanted pockets. All of each cuff’s four buttons are fastened, something unusual—but an improvement—for Craig’s Bond’s who usually leaves the last button open on his Tom Ford suits. The last buttonhole is longer than the rest, as usual for Tom Ford’s suits.

The biggest problem with the suit jacket is its length. Like the suit jackets in Skyfall, it’s about an inch too short—or perhaps two inches too short if you want a traditional English length. The too-short jacket emphasises his hips more and takes away from his masculine physique. In addition to being fashionable, the shorter length may be done to make Craig look taller. Overall, the fit is a huge improvement over the suits in Skyfall, and costumer designer Jany Temime has corrected some of the mistakes she made in her first Bond film.

The trousers have a flat front with side adjusters and turn-ups. Turn-ups with flat front trousers has a long tradition in America, and now with Bond since he has been wearing non-pleated suit trousers with turn-ups since The World Is Not Enough. The legs are narrow, but they have enough room to allow Bond to move around without constraint. The rise looks extremely low, but the trousers also appear to be sagging. Even with the sagging, the rise is still lower than it should be to ensure that no shirt and tie show beneath the jacket’s fastened button. They don’t look particularly comfortable around the fork.

The white shirt has a point collar—which is rather un-British—and double cuffs. The tie is grey and may be solid or have a discreet pattern. The tie is tied in a four-in-hand knot with a well-formed dimple. Bond’s shoes are are black five-eyelet, cap-toe derby shoes on a chiselled last with Dainite studded rubber soles, and most likely the Crockett & Jones Norwich model. Bond also wears Tom Ford sunglasses in some photos.

Spectre London Tom Ford Crombie Coat

The navy “Crombie coat” is made by Tom Ford in Crombie’s famous style. The “Crombie coat” is essentially a three-quarter length chesterfield, and most classically in navy. Crombie has long been so well known for making this type of topcoat that the style is universally known by the brand name. Tom Ford only sets this coat apart from Crombie’s models with his curved “barchetta” breast pocket.

The topcoat is fitted with straight shoulders, a clean chest and a suppressed waist. The front is darted. In following the classic Crombie style, Bond’s Tom Ford topcoat has a navy velvet collar, a fly front with three large hidden buttons, straight pockets with flaps, a single vent and three buttons on the cuffs. Bond only fastens the middle button, which detracts from the elegance of the fly front because the top and bottom buttons are visible. And if the purpose of wearing a topcoat is to stay warm, why only fasten one button? It looks too tight to have the top button fastened anyway, which makes this a poorly fitted coat. The sleeves are also too short. The sleeves on an outercoat should be long enough to cover the shirt sleeves but not get in the way of the hands. Sleeves should be longer for the most warmth. The navy three-quarter coat with a velvet collar recalls Roger Moore’s double-breasted chesterfield in Live and Let Die. It’s just one of a few elements of Bond’s wardrobe in Spectre that has similarities to the clothes in Live and Let Die.

Anatomy of a Sulka Shirt

Sulka-Shirt

Only in GoldenEye, Pierce Brosnan wears shirts from the famous luxury clothier Sulka. Though I’ve written about Sulka’s shirts before, these wonderful shirts deserve a closer look. I own a Sulka shirt of roughly of the same vintage as the shirts in GoldenEye. Whilst my shirt is ready-to-wear (and purchased second-hand), Pierce Brosnan’s shirts are likely bespoke. Though Pierce Brosnan didn’t start using Sean Connery’s shirtmaker Turnbull & Asser until Tomorrow Never Dies, costume designer Lindy Hemming appropriately chose Sulka to make James Bond’s shirts in GoldenEye. Sulka was originally a New York company but also had other shops in the United States as well as in London and Paris. The shirt I will be examining is made in Italy and is the closest of my Sulka shirts in style to Pierce Brosnan’s shirts based on the placket design. I have other Sulka shirts made in France, but those have a different style of placket, as well as different collar and cuff construction. Does anyone know where Pierce Brosnan’s bespoke shirts from Sulka would have been made if purchased through the London shop?

Sulka-Collar

The collar is a moderate spread collar, wider than a point collar but narrower than the traditional spread collar. The points measure 2 7/8, the back height measures 1 3/4 and the collar band measures 1 1/8 in front. There is 1/2 tie space and the collar points sit 4 1/2 apart. This Sulka collar has the same measurements as the Classic Turnbull & Asser collar. The collar is stitched 1/4 from the edge and has removable collar stays. The collar has a fused interfacing, which is how most Italian shirtmakers do their collars. Fusible interfacings are affixed to the outer piece of the collar with a heat-activated adhesive, and by stiffening the outer layer of the collar they make the collar very easy to iron. The shape of the collar on my shirt is similar to Pierce Brosnan’s collar, but the collar on my shirt has twice as much tie space to give it a wider spread.

Sulka-Cuff

The double cuff measures 5 1/4″ when unfolded, and the link holes are roughly in the middle of the folded cuff, but slightly off-centre away from the fold. Italian shirtmakers usually place their link holes in the middle of the cuffs whilst English shirtmakers place their link holes closer to the fold. Placing the link holes further from the fold keeps the cuff from flaring out and getting caught inside the jacket sleeve, but it has the downside of keeping the cufflinks more hidden. The cuffs have a slightly rounded corner, but the stitching is squared. Like the collar, the cuffs are stitched 1/4″ from the edge and have a fused interfacing. The sleeve has two outward-facing pleats opposite the cuff’s opening to fit the larger sleeve into a smaller cuff. The sleeve’s gauntlet has a button.

The placket is similar to an English-style placket; it is just under 1 3/8″ wide and stitched 3/8″ from the edge. The stitching on the placket matches the stitching at the sleeve attachment and at the base of the cuff. The placket has a fused interfacing to keep it crisp. There are six buttons down the front of the shirt, not including the collar, and the shirt’s buttons are mother of pearl.

Sulka-Tails

The shirt’s tails are made in the the typical manner for a shirt meant to be tucked: contoured to be higher at the sides than in the front and back. The back of the shirt has a split yoke, but the sides of the yoke are not angled and the stripes go straight across the shoulders as it the yoke were one piece. Under the yoke the shirt has a pleat on either side to give ease over the shoulder blades.

Sulka-Label

Unlike Pierce Brosnan’s shirts, my shirt has a breast pocket. The pocket has rounded corners and a straight bottom. Like on most ready-to-wear shirts the pocket is a little too large and looks out of proportion on the chest. The pocket is placed very close to the sleeve, which may be placed as such so it stays hidden under an open jacket.

Sulka-Breast-Pocket

Napoleon Solo’s First Suit—1960s American Style

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Ian Fleming’s character Napoleon Solo, played by Robert Vaughn in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., is introduced in 1964 as American television’s answer to James Bond. The pilot episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. titled “The Vulcan Affair” became the first episode of the series and was later made into the feature film To Trap a Spy. Napoleon Solo’s first suit in this first episode is based in traditional American style, but it applies 1960s fashion trends to it. The suit overall is very much a product of 1960s fashions, and the trends of the decade pervade the suit in a much more exaggerated way than any of James Bond’s suits of the decade do. The suave American spy dresses quite a bit differently from 007.

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The suit is made of lightweight taupe wool, likely blended with mohair judging by the suit’s sheen. It is probably woven in brown and white yarns. The suit jacket is detailed in a very 1960s manner. The jacket has only a single button on the front and one button on each cuff. The narrow notched lapels are rounded rather than squared. The jacket has slanted pockets with narrow flaps, and both the lapels and the pocket flaps have swelled edges. The rear double vents are very short and about only four or five inches long.

In the American tradition, the shoulders are natural with little or no padding and the front has no darts. The lack of front darts makes the jacket look somewhat boxy, but it still fits closely and has waist suppression. The main different between a jacket with darts and a jacket without darts is that the one without darts has less fullness in the chest. Solo’s jacket has a very clean and close-fitting chest, whilst the waist is suppressed through the rear side seams and the darts under the arms. In following 1960s fashion, the jacket has a shorter-than-traditional length, but it is just long enough to cover the buttocks. This contrasts with today’s short jackets, which have no intention of keeping the buttocks covered. Vaughn has long legs, and the shorter jacket still makes him look out of proportion. The fashionably short length has the benefit of making the 5’10” Robert Vaughn look a little taller. Especially next to the 5’7″ David McCallum who plays Illya Kuryakin, Vaughn looks rather tall.

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The suit trousers have a flat front, long rise, tapered legs and no belt loops. The long rise is the most significant part of Solo’s suit that separates it from today’s suits. It is long enough to almost meet the jacket’s front button. Going against American tradition, the trousers have plain hems. The trousers also are hemmed short, making these what some call high-water or flood trousers. It’s a traditional American style to hem the trousers too short, and Solo’s are about two inches above where the trousers would meet the shoes in front. The short hem shows off Solo’s black socks.

Solo’s white button-down shirt follows traditional American style just as many parts of the suit do. Likely made of oxford cloth, the shirt has a soft button-down collar, rounded single-button cuffs and a front placket. The narrow tie is black with a pronounced diagonal rib and tied in a small four-in-hand knot. The tie is held against the shirt with small tie clip placed just above the height of the jacket’s button. The tie clip is hidden when the jacket is buttoned.

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Solo’s black shoes are an American style of shoe called longwing bluchers. Longwings have a pointed toe cap like a wing-tip, but they have wings extending the full length of the shoe. Bluchers are similar to derbys in that they have open lacing, but on bluchers the vamp and quarters are one piece, and they have tabs sewn to the front for the lacing eyelets.

When off duty, Solo removes his jacket and tie, unbuttons the shirt’s collar and dons a beige cardigan. The heavy ribbed cardigan is mid-hip-length and fits close to the body. From the collar down to the hem, the front of the cardigan has seven smoke mother-of-pearl buttons, and Solo leaves the top button open. The cuffs have four smaller buttons, like what would be found on a suit jacket. The cardigan has a turndown collar, side vents and a patch pocket on the bottom of either side of the front. The cardigan’s front edge, the collar and the top of the pockets have black piping. The unbuttoned shirt reveals a white crew-neck undershirt, which is something Americans are accustomed to wearing. When the shirt is buttoned with a tie, a crew-neck undershirt follows the base of the shirt’s collar so the outline of the undershirt’s neck does not show. With the shirt unbuttoned, however, a crew-neck undershirt is distracting.

The-Man-From-UNCLE-Cardigan

Though fans of certain American and 1960s fashions may appreciate this outfit, I suspect many fans of James Bond’s style will not. The fashionable and American style of Napoleon Solo differs considerably from the more traditional and English style that James Bond wears the same year in Goldfinger. After the first episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Solo’s clothes became a little less fashionable, but also less interesting.

On a Bond-related note, this episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. features a brief uncredited—but unmistakeable—appearance of Richard Kiel (The Spy Who Loved Me‘s and Moonraker‘s Jaws) as a thug.

Comparing Mr. White’s Grey Jackets and More

Mr. White in Casino Royale

Mr. White in Casino Royale

Just as James Bond is supposed to be wearing the same navy pinstripe suit in the beginning of Quantum of Solace as he is at the end of Casino Royale, Mr. White (Jesper Christensen) is supposed to be wearing the same clothes in those scenes as well. The change of costume designer from Lindy Hemming for Casino Royale to Louise Frogley for Quantum of Solace means that Mr. White’s clothes in Casino Royale were reinterpreted for Quantum of Solace. In Quantum of Solace the clothes have a more traditional and classic look than they have in Casino Royale, and at the same time they also look more modern.

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Mr. White in Quantum of Solace

The jackets in both films are very similar at first glance, but they have many differences. The part that is most different is the cloth, even though they are similar colours. In Casino Royale the jacket is lightweight and charcoal with a thin grey grid check, whilst in Quantum of Solace it’s a heavier donegal tweed in a black and dark grey basket weave. In both films the jacket is likely a button two, but it’s difficult to see since Mr. White never buttons it. Both jackets have flapped pockets and four buttons on the cuffs, but the jacket in Casino Royale has a single vent whilst the jacket in Quantum of Solace has double vents. The cut is also fuller in Casino Royale. The jacket’s shoulders in Casino Royale are straight with a good amount of padding whilst they are softer in Quantum of Solace and have roped sleeveheads.

Based on the Casino Royale jacket’s full cut, straight shoulders and shape of the lapels, it could possibly be made by Brioni, who made Daniel Craig’s suits and shirts as well as the tailored clothes for all the men at the poker table at the casino in that film. I have no guesses as to who made the jacket in Quantum of Solace.

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Mr. White in Casino Royale

The trousers in Casino Royale are brown and grey pick-and-pick, which ends up looking like taupe. They have single reverse pleats—the more common Italian style of pleats that opens outwards—and were a very popular style when Casino Royale was made in 2006. By 2008 when Quantum of Solace was made, pleated trousers had vanished from many stores. Mr. White’s trousers have a flat from in Quantum of Solace to reflect this. The trousers in Quantum of Solace are also a different colour: black and grey pick-and-pick. These trousers are the same two colours that are found in the jacket’s tweed, but the trousers contrast the jacket with a smaller scale and smoother texture.

The shirts in both films have the same idea but different executions. The Casino Royale shirt is dark blue with a white hairline stripe. It has a point collar, rounded button cuffs and a plain front with no placket. The Quantum of Solace shirt has a more classic look in medium blue oxford, which is a basket weave in medium blue and white yarns. It also has a point collar and rounded button cuffs, but it differs from the Casino Royale shirt with a raised placket and a breast pocket.

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Mr. White in Quantum of Solace

The ties in each film also have similar ideas but different executions. In Casino Royale the tie is navy with a brown pebble pattern, and in a diagonal arrangement over the tie are white dots surrounded by four light blue dots. The combination of blue and brown in the tie is a combination that costume designer Lindy Hemming often dressed Pierce Brosnan in for his Bond films. She must not have liked that combination for Daniel Craig, but she found another character to use it on with Mr. White in Casino Royale. For Quantum of Solace, Frogley chose the colours she liked from the Casino Royale tie and came up with her own take on it. This tie is simpler and is a solid navy with white and light blue squares.

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Mr. White in Casino Royale

The shoes, though the same light brown colour in both films, are much different styles. In Casino Royale the shoes are cap-toe oxfords with thin leather soles, whilst in Quantum of Solace the shoes are plain-toe four-eyelet derbys with studded rubber soles. The Casino Royale shoes are dressier and more elegant, but the more casual shoes in Quantum of Solace better match the formality of the sports coat. The belts in both films are darker shades of brown than the shoes, but the belt looks even darker in Quantum of Solace. Mr. White’s socks in Casino Royale are dark brown whilst in Quantum of Solace they are medium brown.

Mr. White in Quantum of Solace

Mr. White in Quantum of Solace

Overall, Mr. White’s outfit in Quantum of Solace is more elegant and more like something James Bond himself would wear. Bond, however, would be more likely to wear black shoes than light brown with grey trousers. The outfit in Casino Royale, on the other hand, is flashier and more continental due to the jacket’s more modern pattern and there being more colours in the outfit.

A Military Jacket and Vest in Archangel

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Pierce Brosnan brought James Bond into the 1990s by turning the spy into an action hero in a way no Bond had done before. With less spying and more extraordinary stunts, Brosnan’s Bond started wearing more combat gear to better suit the stunts, as well as suit Bond’s new action hero image. For jumping off the dam and infiltrating the weapons facility at Archangel in the opening of GoldenEye, Pierce Brosnan wears a military jacket, military trousers and an assault vest.

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Brosnan’s black jacket is a modified American M-1965 field jacket—also called the M65—and made by the venerable Angels and Bermans costumiers. There doesn’t seem to be any reason why James Bond, a British agent, should be dressed in American military gear in Russia, other than because costume designer Lindy Hemming liked the way it looked. Since the jacket is made of cotton and nylon blend, Bond must be wearing a thermal liner or thermal underwear beneath to keep warm in northern Russia.

The mid-hip length jacket has a zip front, covered with a fly that secures with press studs. The jacket’s front has two bellows patch pockets on the chest and two set in pockets below the waist, each with a pointed flap that secures with a press stud. There are also patch pockets on the upper sleeves. Hidden inside the jacket around the waist is a drawstring to give the jacket some shape. The shoulders have straps and the collar stands up with a hood hidden inside a zipped compartment. The collar has a nylon strap with velcro on the left side to fasten to the right side of the collar to keep it closed. The upper left side of the collar also has a buttonhole, with no apparent button on the other side. The cuffs close with velcro.

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Over the jacket Brosnan wears a black assault vest that was also made by Angels and Bermans. The vest has a zip front with a nylon strap around the waist that secures with a plastic side-release clasp. The back of the waist strap has a smaller adjustable strap. There are four large pouches along the bottom, two smaller pouches on the right side of the chest with one taller pouch below it. All are kept close with velcro on nylon straps. At waist level on the right is another pouch that secures closed with a flat and press stud. On the left side there is a holster to fit a Walther PPK with a suppressor. The holster is held in place with nylon straps that attach to the vest with plastic side-release clasps, and the PPK is held in the holster with a velcroed nylon strap over the top. There is a pack on the back of the vest to hold a parachute in case the bungee jump went wrong. Bond’s partner Alec Trevelyan (Sean Bean) wears a very similar vest.

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Brosnan’s black trousers are modified M-1965 field pants, which, like the jacket, are made of a cotton and nylon blend. They have angled, flapped inset pockets on the front for easy access as well as cargo patch pockets on the side of the thighs. The trouser legs tighten around the ankles with either velcro or a drawstring. The black nubuck derby boots have a four pairs of eyelets at the bottom, two pairs of speed hooks above the eyelets and another pair of eyelets at the top. They have moccasin toes and lug soles. The boots are made by Timberland, and back of the sole even say “Timberland” with the tree logo next to it. Brosnan wears black leather gloves with black wool cuffs in the outdoor scenes.

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An example of Pierce Brosnan M65 field jacket was sold at Bonhams in Knightsbridge on 16 November 2005 for £10,800 (http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/11808/lot/395/). Two examples of Sean Bean’s assault vest—which is similar to Brosnan’s vest—were sold at Bonhams in Knightsbridge on 16 Jun 2009. A vest sold along with Bean’s black Sketchers boots for £1,056 (https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/16808/lot/98/), and another vest sold along with Bean’s jumpsuit, which he wears under the vest, for £960 (https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/16808/lot/95/).

Thanks to the people at ajb007.co.uk for previously identifying elements in this outfit.

Roger Moore’s Infamous Flared Trousers

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Roger Moore’s trousers in his 1970s James Bond films are notorious for their flared or bell-bottom legs. Though the flares were most exaggerated in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, Roger Moore will forever be remembered for these trousers. That is unfortunate because Moore’s trousers have some interesting details beyond the rather pitiful flares. Moore’s suit trousers, odd trousers and casual trousers in the 1970s were all very similar, though in Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun they were made by Mayfair tailor Cyril Castle, and in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker they were made by Roman tailor Angelo Roma. Though most today would say the trousers are ruined by the flared legs, there are many interesting details at the top of the trousers.

Along with the flared legs, some may also say that the trouser waist sits too high. A higher waist gives Moore the illusion of being taller, and it gives his actual waist the definition it needs. When the trousers are worn with a jacket, the higher waist keeps the shirt from being visible beneath the fastened jacket button and creates an overall sleeker silhouette.

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Cyril Castle suit trousers in Live and Let Die

Cyril Castle’s Trousers

Cyril Castle’s trousers have subtly flared legs, which would now be called “boot-cut.” They taped gently to the knee and gently flare out below the knee. If there could be an elegant example of flared mens trousers, this would be it. Castle took the fashion trend and did the best he could with it. The hems are angled to cover most of the shoes.

In Live and Let Die the suit trousers are made with “DAKS top” button-tab side adjusters with three buttons, whilst the odd trousers and casual trousers are worn with belts. The suit trousers also have an extended waistband with a hidden clasp closure. Both the waistband extension and the side tabs have a rectangular shape with rounded corners. In The Man with the Golden Gun, all of Roger Moore’s trousers that can be seen are worn with belts. Some of the casual trousers may have been made by someone other than Castle, but they are all made without side pockets.

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Cyril Castle suit trousers in Live and Let Die

The tops of Castle’s trousers have a unique style. The front has long darts of approximately four to five inches sewn down the middle of either side. It’s effectively like having small pleats, but since they’re sewn down the trousers have the cleaner look of flat fronts. Castle obviously believed that trousers without pleats still needed to have shape in the front.

There are neither pockets on the sides of the trousers nor frogmouth pockets on the front of the trousers. This gives the trousers a very clean look, and when Moore moves about there are no pockets to gape open. Instead, the trousers have top-entry pockets on each side at the waistband seam. They’re like coin pockets that would be placed on the right side, but these pockets are larger. These top-entry can be found on Moore’s suit trousers in Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, and on many of his casual trousers as well.

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Roger Moore reaching into the left top pocket of his Cyril Castle suit trousers in The Man with the Golden Gun

The back of the Cyril Castle trousers has a button through pocket and a pair of darts on either side. Ordinarily, darts on the back of trousers go from the bottom of the waistband down to the top of the pockets, but on Castle’s trousers the inner darts extend further through the pockets to give more fullness to the seat. Castle offsets those darts slightly to the outside of the centre of the pocket so not to interfere with the buttons. The second dart on either side goes from the bottom of the waistband to the outer corner of the pocket. Placing the darts to the side of the pockets rather than spacing them over the middle of the pockets—where pairs of rear are typically placed—throws the fullness toward the hips where it may be more useful for Moore’s body. Through his unique method of using darts, Cyril Castle is able to give Moore the fullness through the seat, hips and thighs that he needs without using pleats.

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Cyril Castle linen trousers in The Man with the Golden Gun. Look closely for the two darts above and through the rear right pocket.

Angelo Roma’s Trousers

The tops of Angelo Roma trousers in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker aren’t seen very much since they are usually hidden under jackets and jumpers. Like Cyril Castle, Angelo made suit trousers, odd trousers and casual trousers for the Bond films he worked on. They’re cut with wider flared legs than the Castle trousers are, though from the knee up they still have a very classic look. The hems are angled to cover most of the shoes.

Like the Castle trousers, the Angelo trousers are also made without side pockets. However, they have nothing to make up for the lack of pockets. Some of the trousers, like the black casual trousers in Moonraker, have no rear pockets at all. The trousers chose clean lines over utility, which is an approach women’s clothes often follow. The lack of rear pockets highlights the shape of the buttocks instead of camouflaging it with pockets. The trousers on the dinner suit for The Spy Who Loved Me go the traditional route of having a rear jetted pocket only on the right.

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Angelo Roma dinner suit trousers in The Spy Who Loved Me

The front of the Angelo trousers is plain without darts. Like most better flat front trousers, these trousers are made with a pair of darts on either side in the rear. The darts extend from the bottom of the waistband to where the top of the rear pockets would be, and the darts would be spaced equidistant from the centre of each pocket. This is how two darts on each side of the rear of men’s trousers are typically done. The suit trousers and odd trousers in The Spy Who Loved Me are made with an squared extended waistband. They are neither worn without a belt nor have an adjustable waistband. They are made to exactly the right size so no assistance is needed. Such a waistband is not practical since almost everybody’s waist fluctuates a little. The casual trousers in The Spy Who Loved Me and most of the trousers in Moonraker are worn with belts.

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Pocket-less Angelo Roma black trousers in Moonraker