The Offence: A Navy Suit Like Bond

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The Offence is the first film Sean Connery made when he exited the James Bond role after Diamonds Are Forever. The film was made in 1972 and is directed by Sideney Lumet. Connery plays Dectective-Sergeant Johnson, a police officer who is distressed by and haunted by the violent crimes he has investigated over his career. In a scene where Johnson is interrogated by the detective superintendent, played by Trevor Howard, he wears a navy mini-herringbone-weave suit. Connery was dressed by costume designer Vangie Harrison, who is better known for her work on Get Carter, which was made a year earlier. In his navy suit, Sean Connery is dressed very much like both Michael Caine is in Get Carter as well as the literary James Bond is.

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The suit jacket has three buttons with the lapel rolling over the top button. It has natural shoulders with roped sleeveheads, and it is cut with a full chest and a nipped waist. The pockets are flapped, and there are four buttons on the cuffs and a single vent. The suit trousers have tapered legs, but the front is not seen. This is not a suit characteristic of the early 1970s like what Sean Connery wears in Diamonds Are Forever. The jacket’s notched lapels and pocket flaps are balanced widths, the jacket’s vent is not too deep and the trousers have classic tapered legs. Apart from having a third button on the front, this suit resembles Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits that he wears in all of his James Bond films. This film was made in London, so Sinclair still would have been convenient. Even if it’s not from Sinclair, the suit is much nicer than a suit one would expect a police detective to wear. It fits very well, with the only problem being that the sleeves are just a little too long.

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With the navy suit, Connery wears a white shirt with a point collar—which he unbuttons during the heat of the interrogation—and double cuffs. Since the character isn’t supposed to be a style-conscious man, he wears his double cuffs improperly. He fastens them in a barrel fashion with a button or a cufflink that looks like a button. Cufflinks wouldn’t fit the character. His black textured silk tie is tied in a Windsor knot. Wearing a white shirt and black tie—which somewhat resembles a knitted tie—with a navy suit follows the style of the literary James Bond. If it wasn’t for the tie’s Windsor knot, this might be the closest Sean Connery has ever dressed to the literary Bond. Even his shoes are black slip-ons.

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A Blue Striped Dressing Gown of Shirting

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Roger Moore may be known for his wide lapels, flared trousers and safari suits, but he also loved his dressing gowns and bathrobes. The dressing gown he wears in Octopussy in India is perfect for the hot weather. It’s made of cotton poplin shirting (the cloth a shirt is made from), which is lightweight, breathes well and feels great against the skin. Additionally, it takes up little space in baggage, so this is one of the few dressing gowns we see in the Bond series that most likely belongs to James Bond, as opposed to a hotel or villain hosting Bond. It’s one of James Bond’s most elegant dressing gowns, and it likely came from an English shirtmaker, though it probably isn’t bespoke. Many of the Jermyn Street shirtmakers make similar dressing gowns from their shirtings.

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Bond’s dressing gown is sky blue with red, grey and white stripes. The red and grey stripes are bordered by thin white stripes, whilst the white stripes are bordered by thin grey stripes. The gown has a shawl collar, turnback cuffs, one breast patch pocket on the left and hip patch pockets on either side. The waist secures with a wide belt. The collar, cuffs, pockets and belt are finished with royal blue piping for a luxurious look. The gown is calf-length.

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Marnie: A Black, White and Red Houndstooth Jacket

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Previously I wrote about the black and grey herringbone tweed sports coat that Sean Connery wears as Mark Rutland in the 1964 Alfred Hitchcock film Marnie. The houndstooth check sports coat that Connery also wears in Marnie is made in the same style as the herringbone sports coat, and he wears it in a very similar manner. The jacket’s houndstooth check is in black and white (or rather slightly off white), and it has a windowpane that replaces the black in the check with red. The colours of this jacket look great on Connery’s cool complexion and allow it to work in informal settings outside the country. The cloth of this jacket is very similar to the cloth of George Lazenby’s hacking jacket in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

The jacket is likely made by an English tailor and is cut with straight shoulders on the natural shoulder line, roped sleeveheads, a full chest and a full waist. Though the shoulders look English, the jacket has a fuller cut since Americans often like to wear their sports coats fuller than their suit coats. The men’s costume designer on Marnie, James Linn, was likely American, and Rutland is supposed to be either American or English-American in the film. Nevertheless, the jacket still has some shape, which would show better if Connery buttoned the jacket. The jacket buttons three, but the lapel gently rolls over the top button. The jacket is detailed with flap pockets, three buttons on the cuffs and no vent. It’s an odd style choice to make a sports coat without a vent, especially one in a sporty tweed, but when worn for social occasions and not riding, the lack of vent does not matter. Non-vented jackets are very popular amongst the men in Hitchcock’s films since they have a cleaner look than a vented jacket.

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The medium grey flannel trousers are made in an English style. They have double forward pleats, a tapered leg with turn-ups, button side tabs to adjust the waist and an extended waistband closure. The choice of medium grey for the trousers isn’t the best since they have little contrast with the jacket. However, there is a bit of contrast in texture: woollen tweed for the jacket versus woollen flannel for the trousers. Flannel trousers are the perfect match for a tweed jacket. From a distance, however, the jacket’s pattern looks like solid medium grey, and because the trousers have a cooler tone than the jacket, the outfit, unfortunately, looks like a mismatched grey suit. The scale of the jacket’s check isn’t large enough to work with similarly-toned trousers.

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The jacket and trousers look like a mismatched suit from a distance.

In comparison to the English-style trousers, the shirt is an American classic that Connery never wears as James Bond: a button-down shirt. The key to a successful button-down collar is in the roll. The buttons are placed a bit higher up than where the collar points fall to assist the roll. The button-down collar is a rather casual collar, and thus Connery only wears it with sports coats in Marnie. Most people in England today would never wear a tie with a button-down collar, and button-down collars aren’t as popular in America as they used to be either. Connery’s white button-down shirt has a front placket and most likely single-button cuffs. Connery’s narrow tie is plain black, and he clips it to his shirt with a tie bar, something he never wears as James Bond. The tie bar, however, comes loose and leaves the tie dangling. There’s nothing wrong with a dangling tie, but it should not be dangling with a tie bar. Because the tie is so narrow, it is difficult to tell if he knotted the tie in a windsor or a half windsor knot. The lace-up shoes are black, and whilst they look rather serious in the informal country setting they match the black in both the jacket’s check and the tie.

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Young Q in a Fishtail Parka

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For James Bond’s introduction to the new Q (played by Ben Whishaw) in Skyfall, costume designer Jany Temime dressed Q in a fishtail parka. Compared to James Bond in a topcoat and suit, Q’s parka over a sports coat makes him look less serious, less professional and less mature than Bond, which he would later unfortunately prove the same with his methods. The casual way Q is dressed certainly doesn’t help him earn Bond’s trust. The fishtail parka was originally made for the United States Army in the 1950s with a split and cords at the rear that so each side of the coat could be tied around the legs to keep out the elements. The fishtail parka soon became popular with Mods in the UK, and that connexion makes it fit well with the young Q’s hipster style.

According to Bond Lifestyle, Q’s coffee-brown fishtail parka is from Pretty Green. It has a zip-fastening covered with a fly that secures with press studs. The cuffs also adjust with press studs. On the front of the coat there are steeply slanted pockets with flaps. The waist cinches with a drawstring, which is visible as a ridge around the back of the coat and exits through a hole in either side on the front of the coat. The coat is long enough to reach the upper thighs. The coat also has a hood that cinches with a drawstring. The original coat came with fur trim on the collar that was removed.

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Under the fishtail parka, Q wears a black cotton moleskin jacket from Maison Margiela (according to Jany Temime) in a fashionable button two cut. The jacket has a shorter length, slightly narrow lapels and a very high gorge, which is the seam that connects the collar to the lapels. The lapels have very conspicuous prick stitching, which some makers use to give a false sense of quality. At one time only the best makers used prick stitching, which should be done by hand as subtly as possible. It serves to keep the lapels flat and isn’t meant to be a visual element. Q’s jacket has very bold prick stitching, which is most likely done by machine.

Q’s narrow tie is black with purple tick marks. Spaces between the tick marks create black lines in a herringbone tile pattern. Q’s shirt and trousers are same as what he wears later in the film with his Dries Van Noten cardigan. The shirt from Reiss is pale pink with light grey pencil stripes and has a spread collar and double cuffs. The trousers from Hentsch Man are a check with navy and plum.

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The Avengers: Creative Eveningwear in Red

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The first episode of The Avengers in colour, “From Venus with Love” in 1967, takes full advantage of colour by placing Patrick Macnee’s John Steed in a claret red dinner suit. I was inspired to write about this outfit after seeing Selma star David Oyelowo wear a very similar—and equally effective or ineffective, depending on your opinion—outfit at the Oscars last week. Though Steed breaks the rules of black tie, he does so in a creative way. If one is going to break the rules of black tie, breaking the rues should not turn a dinner suit into an ordinary lounge suit. More than one button on a single-breasted dinner jacket, flapped pockets and single vents (or even double vents by some standards) and very boring and pointless ways to mess with black tie tradition. If you are going to break black tie, at least be original! Steed demonstrates how to be creative with black tie, as he does with all of his tailored clothes. If you don’t like this dinner suit, which I’m sure many of you will not, there are photos of Mrs. Peel here to make this article more enjoyable.

Rather than the traditional black or midnight blue, Steed’s dinner suit is made in a colour often used for the garment that inspired the dinner jacket: the smoking jacket. Claret red is a rich colour appropriate for the evening, unlike the shades of grey that a number of men wore to the Oscars this year. Additionally, the dinner suit is made of silk, a luxurious and appropriate for evening clothes. It reflects a lot of light, making it look lighter than it is in a brightly-lit room.

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This dinner jacket follows Steed’s signature style: a button one jacket with slanted hip pockets, no breast pocket, double vents and a velvet collar. This style is partially inspired by riding jackets, but it works well for an adventurous dinner jacket. Steed’s signature style already has a single button on the front, as a dinner jacket should. The slanted pockets aren’t a big deal since they are jetted. Though the traditional dinner jacket has no vents, double vents are the more acceptable—and dressier—vent style over a single vent. The burgundy velvet collar may be the oddest part of this dinner jacket, but it’s not entirely inappropriate since it recalls the material the smoking jacket is made from. The dinner jacket has buttons covered in silk, and there is one button on each cuff.

The dinner jacket’s notched lapels are faced in burgundy watered silk to contrast them from the plain, slightly lighter-coloured silk of the dinner jacket’s body. Some may argue that notched lapels are inappropriate on dinner jackets, but they were historically worn for less formal black tie occasions, like private dinners. Since a red dinner jacket isn’t appropriate for any proper black tie occasion, notched lapels fit the dinner jacket’s uses. I would argue, however, that peaked lapels would have been a better choice, though they would take away from the dinner jacket’s intended sporting look.

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Tailor Bailey and Weatherill of Regent Street tailored this suit in a traditional English equestrian cut, with strong straight shoulders, a clean chest, a closely fitted waist and a flared skirt. The equestrian cut is similar to the military cut and has a very formal look that is appropriate for a dinner jacket. The dinner suit’s matching trousers are tailored with narrow, tapered legs and are without pleats. They do not have a stripe down the legs.

Steed not only makes bold choices with his dinner suit but also with its accessories. A pale lilac dress shirt—which may be made of silk—stays in the red family but still contrasts with the bold dinner suit. It has a wide spread collar, double cuffs and a plain front. The bow tie is red velvet, which matches the dinner jacket’s collar rather than lapels. Proper black tie means that the bow tie must be black, but since so many other rules are broken here it doesn’t really matter. Steed’s socks are dark burgundy and his chelsea boots are black. Chelsea boots work well for black tie because of their sleek plain-toe, side-gusset design, and they look neat with the narrow trouser legs.

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Ultimately, John Steed’s claret red dinner suit would be best worn for a “creative black tie” dress code, or by the host an intimate black tie dinner. It breaks the rules of black tie in creative ways, but it perhaps breaks the rules so much that it doesn’t even resemble a dinner suit much anymore. Nevertheless, it is suit inspired by black tie that certainly looks like it is meant to be worn in the evening, and for that it is a successful design. The outfit’s contrast of intense and muted colours has the same effect as the traditional black tie outfit’s black and white contrast. Steed may not be dressed conservatively like James Bond in an episode with a Bond-inspired title, but not all spies need to be inconspicuous.

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Unrelated to this dinner suit, “From Venus with Love” has an amusing scene where Steed takes an eye exam of hat styles on shelves rather than letters on a chart. “From the top, if you please”, says the ophthalmologist. “Trilby, homburg, bowler, cap. Jockey, porkpie, topper, boater, busby, fez,” replies Steed, as he passes the eye exam swiftly and perfectly!

Pierce Brosnan for Kia in a Navy Peaked Lapel Suit

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Pierce Brosnan appeared in a Superbowl television advertisement for Kia Motors’ Sorrento Crossover SUV this year wearing a navy suit very similar to what we recently saw Daniel Craig wear for filming Spectre. Though Pierce Brosnan’s suit is a two-piece suit as opposed to a three-piece suit, it is made in a very similar button-two single-breasted, peaked-lapel cut that would suggest Tom Ford. The navy cloth has a sheen that would suggest mohair, possibly woven with yarns in white or other colours to give it extra sheen. The jacket has fairly wide lapels with a considerable amount of belly, and they extend roughly two-thirds of the way between the jacket’s opening and the sleeves. The shoulders are straight and have roped sleeveheads. The sleeves have five buttons on the cuffs. The suit trousers have a flat front and plain hems, and they are worn without a belt. This Kia advertisement plays up Brosnan’s James Bond past, and he is undoubtedly still supposed to dress like James Bond in this advertisement.

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This suit very closely resembles the navy three-piece Tom Ford suit that Pierce Brosnan wore to the premiere of The November Man. The most noticeable difference between these two suits are the cuff buttons. Though both suits have five buttons on the cuffs, they are overlapping in the suit in the Kia advertisement whilst they are touching on the suit the Brosnan wore to the premiere of The November Man. Also, the buttonhole closest to the edge on this suit is the same length as the others whilst it is longer on the suit at the premiere, just like on all of Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford suits. This could still be a Tom Ford suit, but the sleeves would not likely have been finished in house. If this is not a Tom Ford suit, it was certainly inspired by Tom Ford’s designs.

The white shirt has a point collar that stands up neatly inside the jacket’s collar. The collar stands fairly tall, which is flattering because it covers most of Pierce Brosnan’s sagging 61-year-old neck. Brosnan wears the collar open without a tie. Usually a dark suit looks incomplete without a tie, but Brosnan pulls off this look elegantly. The relaxed setting and Brosnan’s relaxed demeanour makes it work. The shirt also has a front placket and double cuffs. Brosnan’s shoes are burgundy cap-toe oxfords and his socks are grey, a neutral tone that neither complements his outfit nor clashes with it. Navy socks that match the suit, however, would have been a better neutral choice.

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If you haven’t seen the advertisement, you can watch it on YouTube.

A First Look at Spectre’s Suits

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Daily Mail has given us a good look at what Daniel Craig is wearing in Spectre. For those who want to read about the suit without spoilers, my write-up of this new suit is free of context. There are many more photos posted at imgur (where the photo above is from), but no more photos will follow in this article.

Daniel Craig’s first suit from Spectre that we get to see is a three-piece navy herringbone made by Tom Ford. It’s likely a mohair blend due to the suit’s strong sheen. It’s made in Ford’s well-known style: a button two jacket with wide peaked lapels and strong pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The shoulders are similar to the Quantum of Solace suits’ shoulders. The dramatic silhouette is inspired by British designer/Savile Row tailor Tommy Nutter’s designs that his former tailors Edward SextonRoy Chittleborough and Joe Morgan still make today. I recommend checking out their work at the links above. Though Spectre is the third Bond film to feature Tom Ford’s suits, this is the first time Bond is wearing Ford’s signature style full-on. Craig’s suit jacket is still too tight and too short like the Skyfall suits, but it’s not as short and not quite as tight. Also, the jacket’s larger shoulders combined with a not-as-short length make Craig’s Bond look like the commanding man he should be. This is where Spectre‘s suits have greatly succeeded over Skyfall‘s. The narrow shoulders and shrunken cut of the Skyfall suits manage to make the muscular Daniel Craig look rather wimpy. The Skyfall suits look like they are a full chest size and length too small whereas this suit from Spectre looks only just a little too tight.

The suit jacket has wide pocket flaps with a ticket pocket, a single vent and five-button cuffs with the last button left open. The jacket’s lapels—being both very wide and peaked—make this suit rather flashy for a secret agent. Peaked lapels on a single-breasted jacket were popular in the 1930s and 40s and are popular again now, but they are not a conservative choice. James Bond previously wears peaked lapels on single-breasted suit jackets in Diamonds Are Forever and Casino Royale. The single vent—like in Skyfall—isn’t particularly British for a dressy worsted suit, but there’s technically nothing wrong with it. Sean Connery’s Bond wears single-vented suits fairly often. This is the style of suit jacket Tom Ford favours on himself, so he may have had more personal input this time around. Roger Moore even wears a suit in a very similar style in his film Street People.

The suit’s waistcoat has six buttons with the bottom button left open. Like the jacket, it looks a little too tight, but Craig doesn’t look like he is going to burst the buttons off it like the Hulk. The trousers have a flat front, somewhat low rise, slide-buckle side adjusters, narrow tapered legs—which are, again, just a little too snug—and plain hems. Yes, that’s right, Bond does not wear turn-ups (cuffs) this time. Only once or twice over the past twenty years has Bond worn suit trousers without turn-ups. The trousers have slipped down, revealing the shirt below the waistcoat. Braces would have helped the shirt to not show, and since Bond is wearing a waistcoat they would be completely hidden.

Daniel Craig not only wears Tom Ford’s preferred suit style but also Ford’s preferred shirt collar. Craig’s white shirt has a point collar with eyelets for a collar pin to stick through it. The silver collar pin is the kind with balls on the end that unscrew to slide through the holes in the collar. It’s the cleanest-looking type of collar pin, but it’s the most affected kind of collar pin as well. Ford himself prefers a collar without eyelets and a gold safety pin that sticks through the collar. Nevertheless, any collar pin is too fussy for the literary Bond’s simple tastes, and it’s a step beyond Skyfall’s tab collars. Pierce Brosnan was a big fan of the collar pin in Remington Steele since it was a popular style in the 1980s. One thing this shirt might actually get right is the cuff style. Click on the image at the top to enlarge and you might see a cocktail cuff! James Bond has not worn cocktail cuffs since Moonraker (not counting Never Say Never Again), but unless my eyes are deceiving me, it looks like he is wearing cocktail cuffs again. A win for the cocktail cuff fans! Costume designer Jany Temime deserves credit for this brilliant homage to the early Bond films. For those who aren’t fans of the cocktail cuffs they add yet another level of flashiness to the outfit.

Craig’s tie is a black-on-black pattern and tied in a windsor knot, another uncharacteristic style for Bond, but it certainly wouldn’t be Bond’s first windsor knot. The white pocket square with a navy border is stuffed in the pocket, though it’s not stuffed in deep enough. It looks like he’s trying to hard to show it off, whereas just a little of it showing from behind the wide peaked lapels would have been more effective.

The black double-monk ankle boots are the Crockett & Jones Camberley. They have a cap toe and Dainite studded rubber sole. Monk boots are not to be confused with Jodhpur boots; monk boots have the quarters over the vamp whilst jodhpur boots have the vamp over the quaters. Though atypical, the boots are actually very Bond-like, recalling a mix of Sean Connery’s and Pierce Brosnan’s Bonds’ footwear. Connery wears black ankle boots with some of his suits in Goldfinger and Thunderball. Pierce Brosnan wears black monk shoes with some of his suits in The World Is Not Enough. The closest shoes to these previously worn by Bond are Sean Connery’s brown monk boots in Diamonds Are Forever that he wears with his light grey suitcream suit and brown checked sports coat. Boots work well with the narrow suit trousers since narrow trousers cover less and are more likely to show sock with regular shoes. Monk boots also respect the literary Bond, who “abhorred shoe-laces,” as Ian Fleming wrote in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. On the other hand, these monk boots are amongst Bond’s flashiest footwear. They might be even flashier than Roger Moore’s Gucci and Ferragamo horse-bit slip-ons!

Over the suit Daniel Craig wears a black greatcoat-inspired topcoat that has many similarities to the greatcoat he wears in Quantum of Solace. It is probably made by Tom Ford. The double-breasted coat is knee-length and has eight buttons on the front with four to button. The coat also has an ulster collar, meaning the coat has revers than can fold over button up at the neck. The ulster collar is more practical but less dressy than peaked lapels. The back of the coat has a half belt with buttons. The style of coat recalls James Bond’s military origins. Craig only buttons the coat’s second button from the top, which causes the rather lightweight topcoat to fall out of shape and rumple a bit. On top of that, the coat is a little too tight around the waist. It’s difficult to tell if the fit, the belt’s setting or the way Craig buttons the coat is the main cause of the rumpling. Both with and without the topcoat, Craig wears black perforated leather gloves that have a strap on top of the wrist. They go well with the black topcoat, but without the topcoat they look villainous. Craig wears sunglasses again in Spectre, and they’re probably made by Tom Ford.

Overall this first clear look of the style in Spectre is very interesting, and costume designer Jany Temime has done a better job with this suit in her second Bond film than she did with any of the suits in Skyfall. Though we see a fit problem again, it’s not as bad as it was in Skyfall. The clothing styles respect James Bond tradition in some areas—like the colours of the clothes, the cocktail cuffs, the boots (in some ways) and the topcoat—and ignore it in others—like the peaked lapels, the boots (in other ways) and the collar pin. The clothes are certainly too flashy for Bond, but at the same time they are very stylish and interesting.

11 Checks and Patterns James Bond Has Worn

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I’ve compiled diagrams of many of the checks and other small patterns that James Bond has worn in his suits, sports coat and other garments over the series into one list for easy reference. Stripes have not been included and will be the subject of a future article.

Houndstooth1. Houndstooth

The houndstooth (or dogtooth) check is one of the most basic checks and the basis for many other checks. It is woven in an even twill weave with alternating four dark and four light yarns in each the weft (lengthwise yarns) and weft (crosswise yarns). The result is a tessellation of dark and light four-pointed shapes. James Bond wears a houndstooth check suit in Goldfinger and a houndstooth check sports coat in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

Pick-and-Pick2. Pick-and-Pick

Pick-and-pick (also known as sharkskin) is a simple pattern woven with alternating dark and light yarns in both the warp and weft of an even twill weave. This results in alternating dark and light diagonal lines, which up close look like tiny zig-zags or steps. This pattern is only used for suits. James Bond wears pick-and-pick suits in From Russian with Love, The World Is Not Enough and Skyfall.

From-Russia-With-Love-Glen-Urqhuart3. Glen Urquhart Check

The Glen Urquhart check is made up of large and small checks and woven in an even twill weave. The large check is the houndstooth check (as seen above) and the small check is a two-and-two check woven with alternating two dark and two light yarns in both the warp and weft. Stripes resulting from having four dark and four light in one direction with two dark and two light in the other direction connect the houndstooth check sections with each other. The true Glen Urquhart is woven with black and white or cream yarns. In smaller scales, this check works best for suits, whilst in larger scales it works better for sports coats. James Bond wears suits with this check—with slight variation—in From Russia with Love, Skyfall and a number of other films. This check often comes with an overcheck in red or blue (with the resulting check often and incorrectly called a Prince of Wales check), and James Bond wears the latter in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. In Diamonds Are Forever, Bond wears a tweed sports coat with a larger, multi-coloured variation on the Glen Urquhart check. Read more on the Glen Urquhart check.

Glen-Check-(Plain-Weave)-FRWL4. Plain Weave Glen Check

This variation on the Glen Urquhart check is woven in a plain weave. The four-and-four sections become two-and-two (a puppytooth check), and the two-and-two sections become one-and-one. The check that results looks very similar to the proper Glen Urquhart check but with simpler shapes and at half the scale. This check is used only for suits. James Bond wears suits with this check in Dr. No and From Russia with Love. Read more on the plain weave glen check.

Glen-Hopsack-Check5. Hopsack Glen Check

This is another variation on the Glen Urquhart check, but it is woven in a two-by-two hopsack weave (basket weave). The two-and-two sections have the same puppytooth check found on the plain weave glen check, whilst the one-and-one sections form a pick-and-pick pattern. The stripes connecting the puppytooth sections also look different than on the plain weave glen check. This check is used only on suits. James Bond wears suits with this check in Goldfinger and Diamonds Are Forever. Read more on the hopsack glen check.

TLD-Gun-Club-Check6. Gun Club Check

The gun club check is a check made up of intersecting bands of colours and ordinarily woven in a twill weave. The bands are at least four yarns wide. A gun club check can have as little as two colours, but more colours are more common. James Bond wears a gun club check sports coat in The Living Daylights that is made up of five colours, and interesting combinations appear when these five colours intersect.

Barleycorn7. Barleycorn

The barleycorn pattern (also known as crow’s feet) is a tessellation of small pointed chevrons and has its own weave. Bond wears a brown tweed hacking jacket with this pattern in Goldfinger and Thunderball.

Broken-Twill-Barleycorn8. Broken Twill/Barleycorn

The barleycorn pattern has a simpler variation which is essentially a broken twill weave that changes direction every two yarns. It’s like a herringbone weave at its most basic. The result are upward and downward ticks. James Bond wears a sports coat in brown barleycorn in A View to a Kill.

Tick-Pattern9. Tick Pattern

The tick pattern is simple check woven in an even twill weave where the cloth varies between two dark and two light yarns in the warp and a single colour in the weft. The result is a pattern of small tick marks. This pattern is typically best used for suits. James Bond wears a tick-patterned tweed suit in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

Herringbone10. Herringbone

Herringbone is a variation on the twill weave weave where the diagonal rib alternates direction to form a broken zig-zag pattern (when the zig-zag isn’t broken it’s called a chevron weave). When two colours are used instead of one, the herringbone weave becomes a pattern. Ordinarily the warp is light yarns whilst the weft is dark yarns. James Bond wears herringbone suits in black and white in You Only Live Twice and The Living Daylights, a black-and-white herringbone topcoat in From Russia with Love and a brown-and-beige herringbone topcoat in Thunderball. In Diamonds Are Forever Bond wears a tweed sports coat in brown-and-black herringbone.

GoldenEye-Birdseye11. Birdseye

Birdseye is a pattern of round dots on a diagonal grid. It has its own very unique weave. The pattern alternates two dark yarns and two light yarns in both the warp and the weft. In a larger scale the pattern looks like large circles with a dot in the centre. In smaller scales it looks like a simple pattern on dots on a diagonal grid. For example, on the pattern pictured here the smaller light blue dots would hardly show up in a finer scale since the dark blue yarns are woven over those four light blue yarns. If the dark and light colours are reversed it can significantly change the way the pattern is perceived. The navy birdseye suit is a favourite of Pierce Brosnan Bond, and he wears examples of it in GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies and Die Another Day.

There are many more unique and interesting checks James Bond has not worn, and there will be an article on those as well.