Daniel Craig at the Spectre Premiere


Daniel Craig arrived at the Spectre premiere at Royal Albert Hall in London properly dressed in Bondian black tie. Craig’s black dinner suit is Tom Ford’s signature “Windsor” model. which is the same model as the ivory dinner jacket that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. Unlike the dinner jacket in Spectre, this black dinner jacket is properly cut for only one button on the front with a lower stance. The suit is likely made of a wool and mohair blend since it has a slight sheen, and many of Tom Ford’s dinner suits are made of an 85% wool and 15% mohair blend.

The dinner jacket is tailored with strong, straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It has a single button on the front, medium-wide peaked lapels, jetted pockets, five buttons on the cuffs and deep double vents. The sleeves are finished with turned back gauntlet cuffs, which wrap around only the outer half of the sleeves and are sewn into inner sleeve seam. The jacket’s peaked lapels, pocket jettings, gauntlet cuffs and buttons are faced in satin silk.


The cut of the double vents doesn’t work well for Craig’s large seat, which is likely why Craig has been dressed in all single vents in his last two films. It’s not because Craig’s build doesn’t work for double vents but rather because the way the vents on this jacket are cut doesn’t work for him. The vents on this dinner jacket don’t completely gape open, but they’re pulled open so that there’s almost no overlap. The vents need to be flared out more to have the proper overlap, and the double vents on the “Rengecy” cut in Quantum of Solace had the necessary flare.

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

The dinner suit’s trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side adjusters and straight legs with a satin stripe down each leg. The legs are narrow but not tight.

The white dress shirt has a short spread collar in marcella cotton, a marcella bib front with no placket and marcella double cuffs. The front of the shirt takes four studs, but Craig’s studs do not all match each other. The first stud looks like smoked mother of pearl with a black centre whilst the second and third studs are white mother of pearl with nothing in the centre. The fourth stud looks like it’s also white mother of pearl, but it has a larger rim. The double cuffs fasten with round double-sided cufflinks in mother of pearl.


The black thistle bow tie is not as shiny as the jacket’s facings and may be a barathea weave instead of matching the lapels in a satin weave. Craig wore a cummerbund that matches the bow tie. He had a puffed white silk handkerchief stuffed into his outer breast pocket. On his left lapel, Craig wore a Royal British Legion poppy pin with two red paper petals and a green paper leaf on his lapel, which commemorates those who were killed in war and supports those currently serving. The shoes are Crockett & Jones Alex black calf wholecuts, which Craig wears in Skyfall and Spectre with black tie.


Daniel Craig wasn’t the only person at the premiere dressed like James Bond. Host David Walliams was wearing the same ivory Tom Ford dinner jacket that Craig wears in Spectre. But whether or not you think Walliams looked good, he was poorly dressed because an ivory dinner jacket should never be worn in the British Isles, especially not in autumn or in London. It does not fit him particularly well, with a noticeable collar gap at times. Likewise, Sam Smith was also poorly dressed in his ivory dinner jacket, looking even worse because of his attached wing collar. Though the wing collar looked bad, it is also too formal to pair with an ivory dinner jacket.

Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes in Spectre

The latest “Basted for Bond” infographic looks at the Tom Ford suits and coats that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. This infographic details the differences between the updated roll two “O’Connor” suit jacket and the peak lapelled “Windsor” suit jacket. The single-breasted and double-breasted are included.


The Spectre Collection at Tom Ford


I visited the Tom Ford shop on Madison Avenue in New York City to see the Spectre clothing first-hand, and I was thoroughly impressed. They had in stock examples of every suit from the film plus a khaki left hand twill cotton two-piece suit that is not used in the film. Unlike the Skyfall suits sold by Tom Ford, all of the suits for the Spectre collection are screen-accurate. The shop also has the single-breasted and double-breasted overcoats, sky blue and purple blue shirts with “Dr. No” cocktail cuff, the white pin-collar cocktail cuff shirt, the nylon-front knitted blouson, the “Sky” wool ski pants with stirrup bottoms and forward pleats, a narrow grey repp tie, three different narrow blue repp ties and a wider black-on-black tie. It’s an impressive collection in both the quality of the clothes and the diversity of the items. Spectre features has the most diverse collection of suitings that Bond has worn since The World Is Not Enough, and Daniel Craig picked out the different cloths himself.

Most of the suits are in the Fit Y O’Connor model, which has narrow notched lapels, slanted pockets and an aggressively shaped cut. Whilst the regular O’Connor suit has two buttons, the Spectre O’Connor suits are completely unique within Tom Ford’s collection in that they have the Regency model’s three buttons with the lapels rolled to the second button. The lapel is more gently rolled on the suits than it looks on Daniel Craig, who wears his suits slightly too tight. If the jacket isn’t too tight, this will allow the lapel to have a very elegant roll.

The black herringbone suit and ivory dinner jacket are the Fit A Windsor model, but it’s not Tom Ford’s usual Windsor cut. Though it has the Windsor’s wide peaked lapels and dramatic roped sleeveheads, the body has the same aggressive cut that the O’Connor suits have. The only difference with the fit of the Windsor compared to the O’Connor is that the Windsor has a slightly wider shoulder.

Despite Daniel Craig’s suits looking just a little too snug on him, the fit of these ready-to-wear suits is the same fit that was developed especially for Daniel Craig. This explains how his suits in Skyfall with a size tag of “48F” could be bespoke and still have a size tag. He was the mould for this collection.

Both suit jacket styles have a very structured and shaped cut, much like what the military and equestrian Savile Row tailors make. The shoulders and chest have a lot of padding for a clean military look, but the jacket still feels natural because it is shaped to the body and doesn’t sit on top of the body. Like the traditional Savile Row suit, the cut is very waisted. It works well for slim and athletic men, though Tom Ford has other cuts that may work better for heavier men.

I tried on both the O’Connor and the Windsor models in a size 48 regular (European sizing), and they fit me perfectly. I am slim, but I do not have Daniel Craig’s athletic build and I am an inch shorter than he is. The fit on me was very close and hugged the body all over, but the jackets were shaped perfectly and did not pull at all. The jacket was also long enough to cover my buttocks. I didn’t feel like I was wearing a high fashion suit, just a suit of exceptional quality that fit me perfectly.

Though there are not a large variety of sizes available for each piece, I was told that most of the suits could be purchased made-to-measure.

Tom Ford suits are tailored and shaped more like Savile Row suits than they are like most ready-to-wear suits, even high-end ready-to-wear suits. Though Zegna’s factories produce Tom Ford suits, Tom Ford’s suits have nothing else in common with Zegna’s and should never be compared. A Tom Ford suit is in no way a marked-up Zegna suit. The cuts are unique to Tom Ford and the construction is different and made to a higher standard, the highest I’ve ever seen in any ready-to-wear suit and comparable to many bespoke suits.

Of the Spectre clothes, I noticed that both the blue Prince of Wales check suit and the blue sharkskin suit look lighter and more vivid in person than they do in the stills, posters and trailers. This lighter blue is not only very trendy, it is the perfect shade for Daniel Craig’s light and warm complexion and blue eyes. The black herringbone suit looks lighter than black double-breasted bridge coat even though they are both black, but the herringbone weave reflects light and prevents it from looking flat like ordinary black suits. The cotton poplin shirts are the softest I’ve ever felt, yet they still have body. The purple blue shirt that Daniel Craig wore in his interview with Jonathan Ross had plenty of sheen, but it didn’t have the same iridescent look in person, no matter which way I turned it.

Cocktail Cuffs on the Jonathan Ross Special


In the ITV special “James Bond’s Spectre with Jonathan Ross”, Daniel Craig dresses down for an interview in what may or may not be clothes that he wears in Spectre. Craig’ s shirt is from Tom Ford in purple blue cotton poplin. Though this shirt has not been seen in any stills or trailers from Spectre, it is part of Tom Ford’s collection of Spectre clothing. The shirting has an iridescent look, which may be the result of weaving blue in one direction and purple in the other direction. This iridescent look, however, almost makes the shirt look like it had a bleach accident. The collar is the same “classic” point collar that Craig’s double cuff shirts in Spectre have. The shirt has a narrow front placket and darts in the back for a slim fit.


Tom Ford calls the shirt’s cuffs “‘Dr. No’ cuffs” because they are based on the cocktail cuffs that Sean Connery first wears as James Bond in Dr. No, though Connery also wears the same cuffs in four other Bond films. The cuffs have two buttons and the same scalloped shape that Connery’s cuffs have, though the top button on Craig’s cuffs is more obscured than on Connery’s cuffs. Overall, the cuffs have the elegant, flowing design that cocktail cuffs should have. The cuffs are attached to the sleeve with pleats, and the sleeves have gauntlet buttons.

Daniel Craig dresses down the lower half of his body with dark indigo wash jeans and Nike training shoes. British GQ wrote about some of the clothes that Bond wears in Spectre, including a pair of selvedge jeans by Rag & Bone. These could be those Rag & Bone jeans. We have not yet seen Craig wearing these jeans in any footage or stills from the film, so these may just be part of his personal wardrobe. The jeans have a slim, straight leg, and Craig wears the bottoms of the jeans turned up. Craig’s Nike training shoes are the Air Max 90 SneakerBoot in “bamboo” tan suede with “newsprint” grey trim at the base, red trim at the top, white soles, blue laces and a black swoosh logo.

A Blue Bathrobe, Courtesy of Dr. No


James Bond wears many bathrobes and dressing gowns throughout the series, and they all started in Dr. No with the bathrobe Bond given after his decontamination shower by Dr. No’s men. The bathrobes and dressing gowns that Bond wears are rarely his own. Bond’s calf-length bathrobe is made of sky blue cotton terrycloth and it is made like any ordinary bathrobe with a shawl collar, turned-back cuffs a patch pocket on the left side of the chest and two patch pockets on the hips. A belt ties around the waist. Bond’s sandals are also provided by Dr. No’s men and are made of woven rope in the natural tan colour of the fibre they are made of. Though slippers are the ordinary footwear to wear with a bathrobe, sandals fit the island location.


Honey is holding Bond’s sandals, with hers inside

The Wild Geese: Tan Leather Bomber Jacket


To celebrate Roger Moore’s 88th birthday today, we look at his classic 1978 action film The Wild Geese. The Wild Geese stars Moore alongside Richard Burton and Richard Harris in a film about mercenaries in Africa. In two scenes in The Wild Geese, Moore wears a tan leather bomber jacket along with some of his classic wardrobe items.

The bomber blouson-style jacket is in a flattering dark shade of tan known as Windsor tan. The jacket buttons up the front with seven gilt buttons, and there are two additional buttons on the collar that button backwards from the revers of the left side onto the right side of the collar. The leather jacket is constructed with a yoke in front, raglan sleeves and only two pieces in back. The inside of the collar, the cuffs and the hem are made of mottled beige ribbed knit wool that’s a close match to the jumpers he wears under the jacket. Slash pockets on either side at the waist have tabs that fasten with gilt buttons.


Under the bomber jacket, Moore first wears a v-neck jumper and a sky blue shirt. The jumper is beige with a hint of olive and most likely made of cashmere. The shirt is made by Frank Foster with the same long point collar that he made for Roger Moore to wear in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. The shirt has a front placket stitched close to the centre. The shirt also has button cuffs, but since the jumper’s cuffs are mostly covering the shirt’s cuffs we can’t tell if they are the Lapidus-style tab cuffs that Moore was wearing as Bond at the time. It’s unfortunate that Moore leaves the first two buttons open on his shirt, since the purpose of such a low V-neck opening on the jumper should not be to show off his chest and necklace. The low V-neck is better suited to a buttoned shirt collar with a tie. But alas, this was the fashion of the 1970s.


In the following scene, Moore replaces his V-neck jumper and blue shirt for a tight-fitting, beige cashmere polo neck jumper. With both outfits, Moore wears tan trousers with a flat front and flared legs. Because the trousers have a sharp crease down each leg, they are likely wool gabardine. But judging by the creasing around the crotch, the trousers are probably lighter weight than one would typically wear with a heavy bomber jacket. Moore wears tan socks and light brown slip-on shoes with the first outfit, and he probably wears the same with the second outfit.


The Thomas Crown Affair: Date Night in a Midnight Blue Suit


Pierce Brosnan wears a large variety of suits from Milanese tailor Gianni Campagna as Thomas Crown in his 1999 film The Thomas Crown Affair. The Campagna suits cost $3,400 each at the time, and they are made of Super 150s wool. For a date with insurance investigator Catherine Banning (Rene Russo) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Cipriani, Crown wears a midnight blue suit. Midnight blue is ordinarily reserved for dinner suits, but the ultra dark shade of blue is also the perfect colour for a suit worn for a less formal evening out.


The suit jacket buttons three, and the lapels roll gently over the top button. It is cut with a clean chest and has straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket has double vents, straight pockets with flaps and four buttons on the cuffs. When Banning is cold at the museum, Crown gentlemanly removes his jacket and places it over her shoulders. The suit trousers are belted and have double reverse pleats and tapered legs.


Crown’s french blue poplin shirt from Turnbull & Asser has a spread collar, double cuffs with the link holes close to the fold, a narrow front placket and shoulder pleats in back. The shirt has gauntlet buttons on the sleeves, which means that if it is a ready to wear shirt it is made of Sea Island cotton since those are the only shirts Turnbull & Asser adorns with gauntlet buttons. The royal blue silk tie—likely in a satin weave—is a bit darker than the shirt. In the late 1990s it was fashionable to wear ties that were close to or matching the colour of the shirt, but there is a good amount of contrast in this outfit for a tasteful shirt and tie combination. Crown ties the tie in a four-in-hand knot with a dimple. With the suit, Crown wears black oxfords and a black belt.


Goldfinger’s Golfing Suit and Cardigan


For golf with James Bond in Goldfinger, Auric Goldfinger wears a traditional English country sports outfit in colours that both flatter his warm autumn complexion and reflect his love for gold. Compared to James Bond’s more modern polo and v-neck jumper golf outfit, Goldfinger looks very old-fashioned. His medium brown—rather like burnt umber—tweed three-piece sports suit unusually includes a jacket, plus-fours, and a flat cap.


The suit jacket, which Goldfinger removes when golfing, has softly padded shoulders with natural sleeveheads and a draped chest, which attempts to gives Goldfinger the illusion of a waist. The jacket has one button on the front, which attempts to give him a more streamlined look. It is detailed with three buttons on the cuff, a single vent and open patch pockets for a sporty look.

Instead of ordinary long trousers, this suit has a type of breeches called plus-fours. They are called plus-fours because they extend four inches below the knee. There are double forward pleats on either side at the top. At the bottom the breeches’ wide legs fasten around Goldfinger’s legs, and the fullness of the breeches’ legs blouses over. Plus-fours are a classic style of trousers for the golf course.


Under the suit jacket, Goldfinger wears a golden yellow cardigan in a very open, crunchy-looking knit wool. The cardigan fastens with six buttons and has small patch pockets. Under the cardigan, Goldfinger wears a cream shirt with a short, rounded point collar and double cuffs. Though the collar is rounded, it’s not as round as a club collar. The tie has stripes in light and dark golds, and dark, medium and light browns. The tie connects all the parts of the outfit perfectly.

Goldfinger’s shoes are chestnut brown bluchers, which are a single piece through the vamp and quarters with a heel counter and tabs sewn to the front for the four-eyelet lacing. With plus-fours, Goldfinger’s plain beige wool socks are on display. On his left hand, Goldfinger wears a golf glove in yellow and brown.


This outfit closely reflects what Goldfinger wears in Ian Fleming’s 1959 novel:

But Goldfinger had made an attempt to look smart at golf and that is the only way of dressing that is incongruous on a links. Everything matched in a blaze of rust-coloured tweed from the buttoned ‘golfer’s cap’ centred on the huge, flaming red hair, to the brilliantly polished, almost orange shoes. The plus-four suit was too well cut and the plus-fours themselves had been pressed down the sides. The stockings were of a matching heather mixture and had green garter tabs. It was as if Goldfinger had gone to his tailor and said, ‘Dress me for golf – you know, like they wear in Scotland.’ Social errors made no impression on Bond, and for the matter of that he rarely noticed them. With Goldfinger it was different. Everything about the man had grated on Bond’s teeth from the first moment he had seen him. The assertive blatancy of his clothes was just part of the malevolent animal magnetism that had affected Bond from the beginning.