A Nylon-Front Blouson and Ski Trousers in Solden


For a snowy mountain adventure in Solden, Austria in Spectre, James Bond wears an elegant outfit of a nylon-front blouson, a mock turtleneck and vintage-inspired ski trousers. The zip-front blouson from Tom Ford is knitted with a fine rib in dark grey merino wool with elasticised cuffs and a mock turtleneck collar. The front of the blouson, however, is blue nylon with 12 large, down-filled ribs. There is a zipped slash pocket on either side of the front.

Under the blouson, Bond wears a mock turtleneck jumper from N.Peal in “Lapis Blue”. It is made from a fine gauge 70% cashmere and 30% silk blend. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. The warm, rich blue is flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion, and the bit of blue that shows from beneath the blouson’s collar brings the needed contrast to the dark shades of the rest of the outfit. The warm colour of the jumper is more like cerulean than a true lapis blue.


Costume designer Jany Temime spoke to Bloomberg Business about the black ski trousers, which Tom Ford calls the “Sky Pant”:

Those were based off French army ski trousers, 1960s ski trousers. I took them to Tom Ford, and he made them for us. It was very old fashioned the way he did it, with the same look.

Since they are based on 1960s trousers, the “Sky Pant” does not have the slim fit of all the other trousers than Bond wears in Spectre. They are tailored from a heavy brushed wool, woven in a pronounced steep twill. At the front there are double forward pleats. The pleats are stitched down roughly two inches at the top about half a centimetre into the pleat. It’s not uncommon for pleats to be stitched down for the first inch or two at the top to help them lay more neatly, but they’re ordinarily stitched down at the edge of the pleat. By stitching down the pleat away from the edge, the sharp edge of the pleat is continued up to the waistband for a less interrupted look whilst still benefitting from being stitched at the top.


On each side of the trousers forward of the side seams is an offset side pocket with rearward-facing flaps that fasten down with a button. There is a a jetted pocket on either side of the rear. The legs are tapered and have stirrups and expanding gussets at the bottom. The trousers have belt loops, but we don’t see if Bond wears a belt with them.

Though the trousers are designed for skiing, James Bond does not ski in Spectre. These may be very stylish, but there are better modern alternatives for actual skiing. If they get wet, the elegant crease down each leg would disappear!


Bond wears the trousers tucked into black Danner Mountain Light II 5″ boots. The boots lace with five pairs of lugs to the toe and two pairs of speed hooks at the top for a secure fit. The boots are made of one piece with leather plus a counter up the back. They have Vibram rubber soles with yellow cleats. Bond wears heavy grey socks folded over the top, meaning the trousers are worn inside the socks as well.

Bond’s sunglasses are from Vuarnet with black leather shields on the sides. The quilted black gloves are made by Agnelle.

How James Bond Wears a Suit for Evenings Out


A midnight blue suit at a cocktail party in Quantum of Solace

Though James Bond is known for wearing black tie in the evening, most people don’t regularly attend such formal events. Bond sometimes goes out for less formal occasions at night, but what does he wear when he still needs to look his best? He wears a suit, naturally. When wearing a suit socially, such as for a cocktail party, an evening at a night club or a special dinner, one must look like they are dressed for pleasure and not for business. Stripes are usually a bad choice for this reason. Checks are great for social occasions, but they aren’t usually dressy enough for the evening unless the check is very subtle. Bond never wears a three-piece suit for evenings out, though in the right cloth a three-piece suit can be a great choice.


Bond having dinner in a lustrous charcoal suit in The Man with the Golden Gun

The cloth is what separates a social suit from a business suit. The cut of a suit or how many buttons it has doesn’t matter as much as the cloth. Darks suits, especially in blue, work best. The richer colour looks best under artificial light at night. Greys and browns are duller and don’t look as good at night, but in darker shades they can work well in the evening. Though worsteds are perfectly fine, luxurious cloths with a sheen, like mohair and silk, can also help differentiate a social suit from a business suit. Flannel can be a good choice for a casual evening out, like with the charcoal flannel suit Bond wears to dinner at the Roma camp in From Russia with Love.

Marine Blue Suit

A marine blue suit at a nightclub in The Man with the Golden Gun

The marine blue suit that Bond wears in The Man with the Golden Gun when at a nightclub in Beirut has a sheen that suggests mohair, making it perfect for both warm weather and for the club. Also in The Man with the Golden Gun, Bond wears a charcoal mini-herringbone suit that has a lustrous sheen for a dinner with Goodnight. Charcoal doesn’t isn’t as dressy as blue is in the evening, but with a sheen it’s an appropriate choice.

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

Though pinstripes aren’t the best choice for the evening, sometimes they work. When meeting Vesper for drinks on the train in Casino Royale, Bond wears a very dark navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes. Because these stripes are hardly noticeable, they don’t give the suit a business-like impression. However, his drinks are in a business setting with a bank liaison, making the pinstripes quite appropriate.

In Quantum of Solace (pictured top), Bond wears the easiest choice for a cocktail party: a midnight blue suit. Though black suits can work well for such an occasion, a midnight blue suit is infinitely more sophisticated. Being mohair tonic separates this suit even further from business suits, and the sheen raises the suit’s formality.


Bond dressed in a shiny grey pick-and-pick suit for the Junkanoo in Thunderball

In warm weather, both dark and light suits can work for the evening. In Dr. No, Bond wears a light grey mohair suit at Puss Feller’s nightclub in Jamaica, though Bond donned the suit earlier in the day. The sheen makes it look great at night. In Thunderball, Bond wears a light grey pick-and-pick mohair suit that also works perfectly for a hot evening out at the Junkanoo in the Bahamas. When Bond dresses up for the evening in warm locations and doesn’t wear a suit, he chooses a navy blazer. The navy blazer is the dressiest of sports coats and has many similarities to navy suit jackets. In the context of this article, the dark colour makes the navy blazer look good at night. Bond wears a navy blazer for his date with Miss Taro in Dr. No and at the Junkanoo in Thunderball.

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro in Dr, No

When accessorising, simplicity and contrast are key for these outfits. The elements are usually a dark suit, a light shirt and a solid or subtly patterned tie. The best shirt for the evening is solid white, like what Bond wears to the cocktail party in Quantum of Solace. Light blue can give the ensemble a friendlier look. Striped shirts are okay, so long as there aren’t multiple colours. Ties should be dark, like navy with all of Connery’s evening outfits; vivid, like the burgundy tie Moore wears with the marine blue suit in The Man with the Golden Gun; or lustrous, like Moore’s satin ties. The shinier a tie the dressier it is, and satin ties should be worn exclusively in the evening. Subtle patterns like on Daniel Craig’s ties are also great for the evening.

The Differences Between the Skyfall and Spectre Tom Ford O’Connor Suits

The Tom Ford O'Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

The Tom Ford O’Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

Costume designer Jany Temime updated the style of the Tom Ford O’Connor suit for Spectre from her and Tom Ford’s original design made for Skyfall. The style changes are easy change to identify, and the biggest difference is the lapel roll. Both suits have three buttons, but whilst the lapel ends just below the top button on the Skyfall jackets, the lapels rolls to the middle button and completely over the top button on the Spectre suits. This is known as a three-roll-two. The lower foreparts—or quarters—of the Spectre jackets are more cutaway than on the Skyfall jackets, but this results in a triangle of shirt showing between the fastened jacket button and top of the trousers. This is not a problem with the jacket but rather a problem with the trousers’ low rise. The lapel roll and quarters on the Spectre suit jackets emphasise the silhouette’s dramatic shape better than the straighter button three front of the Skyfall suit jackets does.

The Spectre O’Connor jackets have four buttons on the cuffs instead of the three buttons that are on the cuffs of the Skyfall jackets. The other details of the jackets are the same: straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, gently slanted pockets and single vents.

The suit jackets in Spectre fit a little different from the suit jackets in Skyfall, but the jackets in both films share many of the same fit problems. The jackets are all fashionably short and have too much waist suppression. In comparison to the Skyfall jackets, the Spectre jackets have a fuller chest, wider shoulders and fuller sleeves. The tighter chest on the Skyfall jackets pulls open, and the narrower shoulders de-emphasise Daniel Craig’s herculean form. These fit comparisons are based on the fit of the jacket in comparison to Craig’s body.

The measurements of the jackets in both films may actually be the same, and because Daniel Craig is no longer so brawny, the jackets in Spectre may look fuller in the upper torso . His slimmer, but still fit, build in Spectre gives the suits an easier fit up top. Whilst the jackets in Skyfall look like they are a full size too small, the jackets in Spectre look like they are the right size (defined by the chest and shoulders) but just have too much waist suppression in the wrong places. Rather than the “shrunken” or “bursting out” look of Skyfall, the suit jackets in Spectre only look poorly shaped at the waist. It’s a slight improvement.

There’s nothing wrong with a closely fitted suit, but to be a well-fitting suit it needs to smoothly follow the contours of the body. Daniel Craig’s suits in both Skyfall and Spectre do not do a good job of following his figure. If the goal is to show off Craig’s physique, a suit that perfectly follows his body with smooth, clean lines will show it off better than a suit with a distorted shape and stressed creasing.

The suit trousers didn’t change much from Skyfall to Spectre. In both films they have a low rise, which seems even lower because the trousers tend to sag down. The trousers are made in the same style in both films, with a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. The trousers in Spectre were hemmed a bit shorter than they were in Skyfall.

Daniel Craig wears four Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre: a two-piece blue and black Prince of Wales check with a light blue windowpane, a two-piece grey herringbone with a track stripe, a two-piece blue sharkskin and a three-piece anthracite pin point damier check. All of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall were made in the O’Connor style.

Daniel Craig at the Spectre Premiere


Daniel Craig arrived at the Spectre premiere at Royal Albert Hall in London properly dressed in Bondian black tie. Craig’s black dinner suit is Tom Ford’s signature “Windsor” model. which is the same model as the ivory dinner jacket that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. Unlike the dinner jacket in Spectre, this black dinner jacket is properly cut for only one button on the front with a lower stance. The suit is likely made of a wool and mohair blend since it has a slight sheen, and many of Tom Ford’s dinner suits are made of an 85% wool and 15% mohair blend.

The dinner jacket is tailored with strong, straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It has a single button on the front, medium-wide peaked lapels, jetted pockets, five buttons on the cuffs and deep double vents. The sleeves are finished with turned back gauntlet cuffs, which wrap around only the outer half of the sleeves and are sewn into inner sleeve seam. The jacket’s peaked lapels, pocket jettings, gauntlet cuffs and buttons are faced in satin silk.


The cut of the double vents doesn’t work well for Craig’s large seat, which is likely why Craig has been dressed in all single vents in his last two films. It’s not because Craig’s build doesn’t work for double vents but rather because the way the vents on this jacket are cut doesn’t work for him. The vents on this dinner jacket don’t completely gape open, but they’re pulled open so that there’s almost no overlap. The vents need to be flared out more to have the proper overlap, and the double vents on the “Rengecy” cut in Quantum of Solace had the necessary flare.

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

Daniel Craig with David Walliams, who is wearing the Tom Ford dinner jacket from Spectre

The dinner suit’s trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side adjusters and straight legs with a satin stripe down each leg. The legs are narrow but not tight.

The white dress shirt has a short spread collar in marcella cotton, a marcella bib front with no placket and marcella double cuffs. The front of the shirt takes four studs, but Craig’s studs do not all match each other. The first stud looks like smoked mother of pearl with a black centre whilst the second and third studs are white mother of pearl with nothing in the centre. The fourth stud looks like it’s also white mother of pearl, but it has a larger rim. The double cuffs fasten with round double-sided cufflinks in mother of pearl.


The black thistle bow tie is not as shiny as the jacket’s facings and may be a barathea weave instead of matching the lapels in a satin weave. Craig wore a cummerbund that matches the bow tie. He had a puffed white silk handkerchief stuffed into his outer breast pocket. On his left lapel, Craig wore a Royal British Legion poppy pin with two red paper petals and a green paper leaf on his lapel, which commemorates those who were killed in war and supports those currently serving. The shoes are Crockett & Jones Alex black calf wholecuts, which Craig wears in Skyfall and Spectre with black tie.


Daniel Craig wasn’t the only person at the premiere dressed like James Bond. Host David Walliams was wearing the same ivory Tom Ford dinner jacket that Craig wears in Spectre. But whether or not you think Walliams looked good, he was poorly dressed because an ivory dinner jacket should never be worn in the British Isles, especially not in autumn or in London. It does not fit him particularly well, with a noticeable collar gap at times. Likewise, Sam Smith was also poorly dressed in his ivory dinner jacket, looking even worse because of his attached wing collar. Though the wing collar looked bad, it is also too formal to pair with an ivory dinner jacket.

Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes in Spectre

The latest “Basted for Bond” infographic looks at the Tom Ford suits and coats that Daniel Craig wears in Spectre. This infographic details the differences between the updated roll two “O’Connor” suit jacket and the peak lapelled “Windsor” suit jacket. The single-breasted and double-breasted are included.


The Spectre Collection at Tom Ford


I visited the Tom Ford shop on Madison Avenue in New York City to see the Spectre clothing first-hand, and I was thoroughly impressed. They had in stock examples of every suit from the film plus a khaki left hand twill cotton two-piece suit that is not used in the film. Unlike the Skyfall suits sold by Tom Ford, all of the suits for the Spectre collection are screen-accurate. The shop also has the single-breasted and double-breasted overcoats, sky blue and purple blue shirts with “Dr. No” cocktail cuff, the white pin-collar cocktail cuff shirt, the nylon-front knitted blouson, the “Sky” wool ski pants with stirrup bottoms and forward pleats, a narrow grey repp tie, three different narrow blue repp ties and a wider black-on-black tie. It’s an impressive collection in both the quality of the clothes and the diversity of the items. Spectre features has the most diverse collection of suitings that Bond has worn since The World Is Not Enough, and Daniel Craig picked out the different cloths himself.

Most of the suits are in the Fit Y O’Connor model, which has narrow notched lapels, slanted pockets and an aggressively shaped cut. Whilst the regular O’Connor suit has two buttons, the Spectre O’Connor suits are completely unique within Tom Ford’s collection in that they have the Regency model’s three buttons with the lapels rolled to the second button. The lapel is more gently rolled on the suits than it looks on Daniel Craig, who wears his suits slightly too tight. If the jacket isn’t too tight, this will allow the lapel to have a very elegant roll.

The black herringbone suit and ivory dinner jacket are the Fit A Windsor model, but it’s not Tom Ford’s usual Windsor cut. Though it has the Windsor’s wide peaked lapels and dramatic roped sleeveheads, the body has the same aggressive cut that the O’Connor suits have. The only difference with the fit of the Windsor compared to the O’Connor is that the Windsor has a slightly wider shoulder.

Despite Daniel Craig’s suits looking just a little too snug on him, the fit of these ready-to-wear suits is the same fit that was developed especially for Daniel Craig. This explains how his suits in Skyfall with a size tag of “48F” could be bespoke and still have a size tag. He was the mould for this collection.

Both suit jacket styles have a very structured and shaped cut, much like what the military and equestrian Savile Row tailors make. The shoulders and chest have a lot of padding for a clean military look, but the jacket still feels natural because it is shaped to the body and doesn’t sit on top of the body. Like the traditional Savile Row suit, the cut is very waisted. It works well for slim and athletic men, though Tom Ford has other cuts that may work better for heavier men.

I tried on both the O’Connor and the Windsor models in a size 48 regular (European sizing), and they fit me perfectly. I am slim, but I do not have Daniel Craig’s athletic build and I am an inch shorter than he is. The fit on me was very close and hugged the body all over, but the jackets were shaped perfectly and did not pull at all. The jacket was also long enough to cover my buttocks. I didn’t feel like I was wearing a high fashion suit, just a suit of exceptional quality that fit me perfectly.

Though there are not a large variety of sizes available for each piece, I was told that most of the suits could be purchased made-to-measure.

Tom Ford suits are tailored and shaped more like Savile Row suits than they are like most ready-to-wear suits, even high-end ready-to-wear suits. Though Zegna’s factories produce Tom Ford suits, Tom Ford’s suits have nothing else in common with Zegna’s and should never be compared. A Tom Ford suit is in no way a marked-up Zegna suit. The cuts are unique to Tom Ford and the construction is different and made to a higher standard, the highest I’ve ever seen in any ready-to-wear suit and comparable to many bespoke suits.

Of the Spectre clothes, I noticed that both the blue Prince of Wales check suit and the blue sharkskin suit look lighter and more vivid in person than they do in the stills, posters and trailers. This lighter blue is not only very trendy, it is the perfect shade for Daniel Craig’s light and warm complexion and blue eyes. The black herringbone suit looks lighter than black double-breasted bridge coat even though they are both black, but the herringbone weave reflects light and prevents it from looking flat like ordinary black suits. The cotton poplin shirts are the softest I’ve ever felt, yet they still have body. The purple blue shirt that Daniel Craig wore in his interview with Jonathan Ross had plenty of sheen, but it didn’t have the same iridescent look in person, no matter which way I turned it.

Cocktail Cuffs on the Jonathan Ross Special


In the ITV special “James Bond’s Spectre with Jonathan Ross”, Daniel Craig dresses down for an interview in what may or may not be clothes that he wears in Spectre. Craig’ s shirt is from Tom Ford in purple blue cotton poplin. Though this shirt has not been seen in any stills or trailers from Spectre, it is part of Tom Ford’s collection of Spectre clothing. The shirting has an iridescent look, which may be the result of weaving blue in one direction and purple in the other direction. This iridescent look, however, almost makes the shirt look like it had a bleach accident. The collar is the same “classic” point collar that Craig’s double cuff shirts in Spectre have. The shirt has a narrow front placket and darts in the back for a slim fit.


Tom Ford calls the shirt’s cuffs “‘Dr. No’ cuffs” because they are based on the cocktail cuffs that Sean Connery first wears as James Bond in Dr. No, though Connery also wears the same cuffs in four other Bond films. The cuffs have two buttons and the same scalloped shape that Connery’s cuffs have, though the top button on Craig’s cuffs is more obscured than on Connery’s cuffs. Overall, the cuffs have the elegant, flowing design that cocktail cuffs should have. The cuffs are attached to the sleeve with pleats, and the sleeves have gauntlet buttons.

Daniel Craig dresses down the lower half of his body with dark indigo wash jeans and Nike training shoes. British GQ wrote about some of the clothes that Bond wears in Spectre, including a pair of selvedge jeans by Rag & Bone. These could be those Rag & Bone jeans. We have not yet seen Craig wearing these jeans in any footage or stills from the film, so these may just be part of his personal wardrobe. The jeans have a slim, straight leg, and Craig wears the bottoms of the jeans turned up. Craig’s Nike training shoes are the Air Max 90 SneakerBoot in “bamboo” tan suede with “newsprint” grey trim at the base, red trim at the top, white soles, blue laces and a black swoosh logo.

James Bond’s Warm-Weather Black Tie Etiquette


Daniel Craig’s ivory dinner jacket in Spectre

After 30 years, James Bond will once again be wearing an ivory dinner jacket in Spectre. Bond started a tradition of often wearing an ivory dinner jacket in warm climates 51 years ago in Goldfinger. In the six appearances of the ivory dinner jacket throughout the series, Bond has demonstrated how to properly wear warm weather black tie.

Bond’s warm-weather dinner jackets are ivory and not pure white because many natural fibres—particularly wool—have oils that prevent them from being bleached pure white. Calling it a “white” dinner jacket is not incorrect since white is the intended colour. Though Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jackets are made of wool, Roger Moore wears ivory dinner jackets in silk and linen. Daniel Craig’s ivory dinner jacket in Spectre is made of 56% silk and 44% viscose, a cool-wearing semi-synthetic fibre derived from cellulose.

Bond's first ivory dinner jacket in Goldfinger

Bond’s first ivory dinner jacket in Goldfinger

The ivory dinner jacket is part of the black tie dress code, which means it should only be worn after 6 pm. A light jacket does not mean it is for daytime. The jacket follows the conventions of its black and midnight blue counterparts, and the only exception is that the ivory dinner jacket traditionally does not have silk facings. Silk facings on an ivory dinner jacket are typically the mark of the cheap rental, though Daniel Craig’s considerably expensive ivory Tom Ford dinner jacket in Spectre has grosgrain silk facings. It lacks the refined taste of Bond’s previous ivory dinner jackets. Whilst black and midnight blue dinner jackets have silk facings to primarily differentiate them from ordinary lounge jackets, the ivory dinner jacket does not need such a distinctive mark. White dinner jackets are always worn with black or midnight blue trousers that match.

The ivory dinner jacket is strictly worn in warm weather. There’s no absolute consensus as to where the ivory dinner jacket should appropriately be worn, except it should never be worn in the British Isles, never in large cities and only in warm weather. Bernhard Roetzel states in his book Gentleman: A Timeless Guide to Fashion, “The white tuxedo is worn at open-air evening parties and on cruises.” Roetzel’s statement suggests that if the weather is warm enough to be comfortable outdoors, the ivory dinner jacket is appropriate.

Sean Connery's ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever

Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever

The tropics are the most appropriate place for an ivory dinner jacket. Sean Connery wears his ivory dinner jacket in the Goldfinger pre-title sequence in an unknown country in Latin American, a tropical region. Connery again wears the ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever in Las Vegas. Las Vegas in not in the tropics, but the ivory dinner jacket is well-suited for its hot desert climate. The ivory dinner jacket is generally considered appropriate anywhere in the United States during the summer months, though some consider the northern states’ climate to not be right at any time of year for it.

In Thunderball, Bond visits the Bahamas, which is an appropriate location for an ivory dinner jacket. In the casino scene there, Adolfo Celi’s villain Largo is dressed in an elegant double-breasted ivory dinner jacket, whilst Bond contrasts him in an equally suitable midnight blue mohair dinner suit. However, Bond opts for the white dinner jacket in Ian Fleming’s novel Thunderball.


Roger Moore’s ivory dinner jacket in The Man with Golden Gun

Roger Moore first wears an ivory dinner jacket in The Man with the Golden Gun for a 9 pm dinner with Hai Fat in Thailand, which is within the tropics. Moore later wears an ivory dinner jacket in Octopussy in Udaipur, India, which lies one degree of latitude north of the Tropic of Cancer. Though technically not in the tropics, the weather is certainly hot enough to justify wearing an ivory dinner jacket. When Bond arrives at Kamal Khan’s club in his dinner jacket, the sky is still light. If it is June or July, it could be 6 pm. Only a few scenes later, Bond is having dinner in the same dinner jacket under a night sky.

Roger Moore’s last ivory dinner jacket is worn in daylight in A View to a Kill at Château de Chantilly in France, just north of Paris. Though it is daylight, the reception Bond attends starts at 6 pm, and because this scene takes place not long after the Royal Ascot at the beginning of summer, the sunset in the part of France would have been close to 10 pm. However, the location for wearing an ivory dinner jacket is questionable as it is very far north of the tropics and has the same climate as England. But since the weather is warm and the reception is outdoors, the ivory dinner jacket doesn’t look out of place. The ivory dinner jacket is more appropriate down south in the sub-tropical Mediterranean region, where Roger Moore occasionally wears a white silk dinner jacket in The Saint.

Roger Moore's ivory dinner jacket in A View to a Kill

Roger Moore’s ivory dinner jacket in A View to a Kill

Daniel Craig wears an ivory dinner jacket in Spectre in Morocco, a country with a largely Mediterranean climate. Humphrey Bogart established a precedent for wearing an ivory dinner jacket in Morocco in the 1942 film Casablanca. Based on the trailer, Bond appropriately wears his dinner jacket in the evening whilst having dinner on a train.

Despite the ivory dinner jacket being just as classic as black and midnight blue, they go in and out of fashion, and some people don’t care for them. Hardy Amies writes in his 1994 book The Englishman’s Suit:

One has to say firmly that a white dinner coat is effortlessly ‘naff’. It was derided by those who knew what was what in Venice ten years ago. I don’t suppose it matters what you wear in the Caribbean. But it looks seriously awful in Europe. It is also very impractical. A dinner suit should be made in a cloth of the lightest weight available, in midnight blue, of course. You can then wear it all the year round. The cloth used in white coats is not lighter and, if not wool, creases unattractively.

Also in the 1990s, Bond shared Amies’ opinion and did not wear any ivory dinner jackets. He could have in the Monte Carlo casino in GoldenEye, but every man in the casino is dressed in black. In The World is Not Enough, some men in the Azerbaijan casino are dressed in ivory dinner jackets, but Bond wears midnight blue. It’s a less appropriate location for an ivory dinner jacket, especially considering that it’s wintertime. Bond’s ally Valentin Zukovsky wears a flashy light taupe dinner jacket, which, like the ivory dinner jacket, is better suited for a warmer place.


Roger Moore’s ivory dinner jacket in Octopussy