James Bond Brings Back the Turtleneck

Spectre Teaser Poster

If Daniel Craig’s fashion sense is anything to go on, the turtleneck has boldly returned. Craig had the power to return shawl collar cardigans to the forefront of fashion after wearing them as James Bond in Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace, and he will no doubt do the same for the turtleneck after wearing three in Spectre.

The turtleneck, also known as the polo neck or roll neck, is a knitted jumper that has a close-fitting high collar that rolls over to cover the neck all around. An alternative to the turtleneck is the shorter and more modern mock turtleneck, which does not fold over. Turtlenecks saw their heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, while mock turtlenecks ruled in the 1990s. Both the true turtleneck and the mock turtleneck are returning in Spectre.


Daniel Craig wears a dark charcoal grey fine gauge mock turtleneck made of cashmere and silk from British company N.Peal on the teaser poster for Spectre with charcoal tick-patterned trousers and a shoulder holster. This look immediately recalls the 1973 film Live and Let Die, in which Roger Moore wears a black full turtleneck with black trousers and shoulder holster. Craig’s dark grey version better flatters his fair complexion and adds more subtle interest in updating the look. In the film, Craig will be wearing a dark blue-grey suede Racer Jacket from John Varvatos over the mock turtleneck to conceal his gun.

Both Daniel Craig in Spectre and Roger Moore in Live and Let Die were inspired to wear this look after Steve McQueen famously wore a dark blue turtleneck sweater with a shoulder holster as police lieutenant Frank Bullitt in the 1968 film Bullitt. This look is only seen briefly at the end of the film since he is usually wearing a brown herringbone, elbow-patched tweed jacket to hide his gun and holster. Bullitt‘s poster and publicity stills, which are without the jacket, are what made the look so iconic. Not only does Daniel Craig copy McQueen’s turtleneck and shoulder holster look in Spectre, but he also wears the same brown suede Sanders & Sanders “Playboy” chukka boots that McQueen wears in Bullitt.


Steve McQueen in Bullitt

Before Steve McQueen wore the turtleneck and holster in Bullitt, it was a popular look for agents in the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Robert Vaughn first wore this look as Napoleon Solo in the 1965 episode “The Four-Steps Affair”, but David McCallum’s character Illya Kuryakin is more famous for the look and first wore it in the following episode “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”.


David McCallum as Illya Kuryakin in “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”

Besides the charcoal grey mock turtleneck, Daniel Craig wears another mock turtleneck in Spectre under a dark grey nylon-front knitted wool blouson from Tom Ford while on his mission in snowy Austria. This example, which is also from N.Peal, is identical to the dark charcoal grey piece, except it is made in a vivid medium shade of blue called “Lapis Blue”.

Daniel Craig wears a third turtleneck in Spectre from N.Peal in a colour they call “Fumo Grey”, which is a light and warm shade of grey. This turtleneck is the more traditional full roll-neck style and is designed for warmth. It is cable-knitted and in a heavier Mongolian cashmere. Craig wears it under a heavy navy wool zip-front blouson in the Austrian Alps.


N.Peal turtleneck in “Fumo Grey” from Spectre

Spectre and Live and Let Die are not the only two James Bond films to feature turtlenecks. Sean Connery introduced the mock turtleneck to the Bond in the 1967 film You Only Live Twice when he wears a grey top to infiltrate the SPECTRE volcano headquarters. Sean Connery wears full turtlenecks in Diamond Are Forever with his brown tweed jackets. In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, George Lazenby wears orange and white turtlenecks as part of his golf and ski outfits, respectively.

Roger Moore undoubtedly holds the status as the turtleneck James Bond. In The Spy Who Loved Me he wears a navy turtleneck as part of his naval battle dress, and in Moonraker he wears a cream turtleneck under a double-breasted navy blazer. The 1981 Bond film For Your Eyes Only is tied with Spectre for featuring the most turtlenecks. In this film, Moore wears his turtlenecks under a shearling blouson and a ski jacket in the Italian Alps as well as under a lightweight blouson in Greece. Until Spectre, Die Another Day was the last Bond film to feature a turtleneck. Pierce Brosnan wears a heavy cashmere cable-knit mock turtleneck from the Scottish company Ballantyne, now liquidated, in the 2002 film.

Bond's last turtleneck in Die Another Day

Bond’s last turtleneck in Die Another Day

This article was originally published in 20 Minuten.

A Blue Bathrobe, Courtesy of Dr. No


James Bond wears many bathrobes and dressing gowns throughout the series, and they all started in Dr. No with the bathrobe Bond given after his decontamination shower by Dr. No’s men. The bathrobes and dressing gowns that Bond wears are rarely his own. Bond’s calf-length bathrobe is made of sky blue cotton terrycloth and it is made like any ordinary bathrobe with a shawl collar, turned-back cuffs a patch pocket on the left side of the chest and two patch pockets on the hips. A belt ties around the waist. Bond’s sandals are also provided by Dr. No’s men and are made of woven rope in the natural tan colour of the fibre they are made of. Though slippers are the ordinary footwear to wear with a bathrobe, sandals fit the island location.


Honey is holding Bond’s sandals, with hers inside

The Wild Geese: Tan Leather Bomber Jacket


To celebrate Roger Moore’s 88th birthday today, we look at his classic 1978 action film The Wild Geese. The Wild Geese stars Moore alongside Richard Burton and Richard Harris in a film about mercenaries in Africa. In two scenes in The Wild Geese, Moore wears a tan leather bomber jacket along with some of his classic wardrobe items.

The bomber blouson-style jacket is in a flattering dark shade of tan known as Windsor tan. The jacket buttons up the front with seven gilt buttons, and there are two additional buttons on the collar that button backwards from the revers of the left side onto the right side of the collar. The leather jacket is constructed with a yoke in front, raglan sleeves and only two pieces in back. The inside of the collar, the cuffs and the hem are made of mottled beige ribbed knit wool that’s a close match to the jumpers he wears under the jacket. Slash pockets on either side at the waist have tabs that fasten with gilt buttons.


Under the bomber jacket, Moore first wears a v-neck jumper and a sky blue shirt. The jumper is beige with a hint of olive and most likely made of cashmere. The shirt is made by Frank Foster with the same long point collar that he made for Roger Moore to wear in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. The shirt has a front placket stitched close to the centre. The shirt also has button cuffs, but since the jumper’s cuffs are mostly covering the shirt’s cuffs we can’t tell if they are the Lapidus-style tab cuffs that Moore was wearing as Bond at the time. It’s unfortunate that Moore leaves the first two buttons open on his shirt, since the purpose of such a low V-neck opening on the jumper should not be to show off his chest and necklace. The low V-neck is better suited to a buttoned shirt collar with a tie. But alas, this was the fashion of the 1970s.


In the following scene, Moore replaces his V-neck jumper and blue shirt for a tight-fitting, beige cashmere polo neck jumper. With both outfits, Moore wears tan trousers with a flat front and flared legs. Because the trousers have a sharp crease down each leg, they are likely wool gabardine. But judging by the creasing around the crotch, the trousers are probably lighter weight than one would typically wear with a heavy bomber jacket. Moore wears tan socks and light brown slip-on shoes with the first outfit, and he probably wears the same with the second outfit.


The Thomas Crown Affair: Date Night in a Midnight Blue Suit


Pierce Brosnan wears a large variety of suits from Milanese tailor Gianni Campagna as Thomas Crown in his 1999 film The Thomas Crown Affair. The Campagna suits cost $3,400 each at the time, and they are made of Super 150s wool. For a date with insurance investigator Catherine Banning (Rene Russo) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Cipriani, Crown wears a midnight blue suit. Midnight blue is ordinarily reserved for dinner suits, but the ultra dark shade of blue is also the perfect colour for a suit worn for a less formal evening out.


The suit jacket buttons three, and the lapels roll gently over the top button. It is cut with a clean chest and has straight shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket has double vents, straight pockets with flaps and four buttons on the cuffs. When Banning is cold at the museum, Crown gentlemanly removes his jacket and places it over her shoulders. The suit trousers are belted and have double reverse pleats and tapered legs.


Crown’s french blue poplin shirt from Turnbull & Asser has a spread collar, double cuffs with the link holes close to the fold, a narrow front placket and shoulder pleats in back. The shirt has gauntlet buttons on the sleeves, which means that if it is a ready to wear shirt it is made of Sea Island cotton since those are the only shirts Turnbull & Asser adorns with gauntlet buttons. The royal blue silk tie—likely in a satin weave—is a bit darker than the shirt. In the late 1990s it was fashionable to wear ties that were close to or matching the colour of the shirt, but there is a good amount of contrast in this outfit for a tasteful shirt and tie combination. Crown ties the tie in a four-in-hand knot with a dimple. With the suit, Crown wears black oxfords and a black belt.


Bullseye!: A Double-Breasted Grey Chalk Stripe Suit


Roger Moore as Gerald Bradley-Smith, with Michael Caine

The 1990 Michael Winner film Bullseye! stars Roger Moore and Michael Caine as both a pair a nuclear physicists and a pair of con men who impersonate the physicists. It also features Roger Moore’s daughter Deborah Moore (credited as Deborah Barrymore) and Derren Nesbitt, whom shirtmaker Frank Foster said I resemble a younger version of. John Bloomfield is the costume designer. Though Moore and Caine shared the same tailor, Douglas Hayward, there isn’t a whole lot of Hayward’s tailoring in the film. Aquascutum is thanked in the credits for contributing suits, coats and raincoats for both Moore and Caine. Dormeuil, a French textile company, is also thanked in the credits, but their cloths may have been used for women’s clothing.


Roger Moore as Sir John Bavistock

Roger Moore plays two characters in this film, Sir John Bavistock, a nuclear physicist, and Gerald Bradley-Smith, a conman who resembles Bavistock. In trying to impersonate Bavistock, Bradley-Smith purchases a suit identical to the double-breasted, dark grey chalk stripe suit Bavistock wears. The suit resembles the navy double-breasted suit made by Douglas Hayward that Roger Moore wears as James Bond in Octopussy, and this suit in Bullseye! was most likely made by Hayward.

Bradley-Smith picking out Bavistock's suit

Bradley-Smith picking out Bavistock’s suit

The double-breasted suit jacket has four buttons with one to button, which was a popular style in the 1980s and early 1990s. Though more fashionable brands usually paired this low keystone buttoning style with a low gorge (the seam where the collar meets the lapels), Hayward kept the gorge at a classic height. The jacket has soft shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a moderately full chest and a suppressed waist (as suppressed as Moore’s girthier figure can handle). The jacket has a very flattering cut and style for Moore’s body.

Roger Moore with Sally Kirkland, Deborah Moore and Derren Nesbitt

Roger Moore with Sally Kirkland, Deborah Moore and Derren Nesbitt

Moore’s suit jacket is detailed with flapped pockets, double vents and four buttons on each cuff. The suit trousers have medium-width straight legs with plain hems, side pockets and likely a flat or darted front.

There are two small details that make the Bullseye! suit’s jacket different from the Octopussy navy suit’s jacket. The jacket in Octopussy has three cuff buttons whilst the Bullseye! jacket has four cuff buttons. Also, the jacket in Octopussy has a buttonhole in each lapel, but the Bullseye! jacket only has a buttonhole in the left lapel. I’ve seen suit jackets from Hayward made in this era that match the details on this suit jacket, so it’s still most likely that Hayward made this suit.


With the suit Moore wears a pale blue shirt that has a spread collar and double cuffs. The shirt is not made by Moore’s longtime shirtmaker Frank Foster due to its much shorter collar and link holes centred on the double cuffs instead of off-centred towards the fold. The regimental tie has stripes alternating red-navy-brown-navy, with the navy stripes slightly narrower than the others. This is the Winchester College tie, also known as the Old Wykehamist tie after the name for Winchester alumni. BIll Tanner wears the same tie with a similar suit in For Your Eyes Only. Moore knots the tie in a four-in-hand knot. He wears black shoes with the suit.


The Quiller Memorandum: A Dependable Grey Suit


The popularity of the spy genre in the 1960s brought us the 1966 film The Quiller Memorandum. The character Qullier was originally written by novelist Elleston Trevor—under the pseudonym Adam Hall—as a British agent in the 1965 novel The Berlin Memorandum. In The Quiller Memorandum he is an American played by American actor George Segal, but he is still working for the British.


The Quiller Memorandum has a few things in common with the James Bond series, including a John Barry score (which is very different from his Bond scores), a song sung by “From Russia With Love” singer Matt Monro, and a villain played by Max von Sydow (who played Blofed in the unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again). Though the film is not especially unique or interesting, the main character is well-dressed in a Bond-like manner. Like Cary Grant does in North By Northwest, George Segal wears a single suit throughout almost the entire film. Only in the final scene of the film does Segal change his clothes. But unlike in Northwest By Northwest, the suit in The Quiller Memorandum never has a chance to get cleaned.


Though Quiller is an American in this film, the film was made in England and Germany, and George Segal is almost certainly wearing an English suit. Like Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, Segal’s suit has an unassuming look that is perfect for a spy. The suit is tailored in a Bond-like lightweight medium grey pick-and-pick wool and has a similar cut to Sean Connery’s Anthony Sinclair suits, but with a few notable differences. The suits are similar in that jackets both button two and are cut with soft shoulders, roped sleeveheads, a full chest, a gently nipped waist and narrow lapels. Instead of the low button stance on Connery’s suit jackets, Segal’s suit jacket has a medium button stance.


Segal’s suit jacket is cut with a slightly short length to reflect the contemporary trends, but the jacket is just long enough to cover his buttocks. It is detailed with jetted pockets, three cuff buttons and double vents. Black buttons contrast with the jacket. The suit trousers have an extended waistband with a hidden hook-and-eye closure, “Daks top” side adjusters with two buttons, slanted side pockets, front darts (positioned in front of the pockets) and straight legs with turn-ups.

Under the suit, Segal wears an ecru shirt with a point collar that has a lot of tie space, a front placket and rounded single-button cuffs. The cuff button is placed near the base of the cuff. The textured burgundy tie is very flattering to Segal’s warm spring complexion and blonde hair, and he ties it in a four-in-hand knot. Segal wears black lace-up shoes with his suit.


George Segal wears clothes by On Her Majesty’s Secret Service tailor Dimi Major in the 1973 film A Touch of Class. The suit in The Quiller Memorandum shares a slight resemblance with Dimi Major’s cut, and the shoulders on Segal’s suits in A Touch of Class look identical to this suit’s shoulders. The Quiller suit lacks the fashionable flair that could be found on George Lazenby’s suits three years later, and though the shape of the jacket’s lapels is different, the trouser style is the same. There is a possibility that Dimi Major could have made this suit.


What Kind of Underwear Would Bond Wear?


Sea island cotton boxer shorts from Turnbull & Asser, likely what Ian Fleming had in mind for James Bond, and maybe what he wore himself

We see James Bond in swimming trunks, pyjamas and dressing gowns, but we never see James Bond in his underwear in the films. There’s a slight peak of it in Casino Royale, but we can’t tell what kind it is. Bond most likely has varied his underwear styles throughout the decades. Ian Fleming specified “nylon underclothes” in the novel Diamonds Are Forever, which have great drying properties. In The Man with the Golden Gun novel, Fleming wrote about a different, more luxurious type of underwear:

Bond then took off his clothes, put his gun and holster under a pillow, rang for the valet, and had his suit taken away to be pressed. By the time he had taken a hot shower followed by an ice-cold one and pulled on a fresh pair of sea island cotton underpants, the bourbon had arrived.”

The “sea island cotton underpants” are undoubtedly referring to the woven boxer short style, since old-fashioned men in Britain at the time wore little else. The cotton material would be similar or identical to Bond’s sea island cotton shirts that Fleming specified. Some shirtmakers make boxer shorts to match their customers’ shirts. Sean Connery and Roger Moore most likely also wear woven boxer shorts as Bond, considering that was traditionally what men wore in Britain. Roger Moore can be seen in cotton boxer shorts in the 1969 film Crossplot, which took its wardrobe from Moore’s television show The Saint. Connery’s and Moore’s trousers have enough fullness in the thighs to accommodate boxer shorts.

Sean Connery wearing cream boxer shorts and a white vest in Never Say Never Again

Sean Connery wearing cream boxer shorts and a white vest in Never Say Never Again

In the unofficial James Bond film Never Say Never Again, Sean Connery wears cream boxer shorts with a white vest (also known as an A-shirt). Bond had just discarded his dinner suit to escape on a bicycle, so he must have been wearing these clothes under his dinner suit. The British ordinarily aren’t fond of undershirts, and Bond almost never wears them. To blend in as an American in Fleming’s novel Live and Let Die, Bond wears “nylon vests and pants (called T-shirts and shorts)”. However, the “nylon underclothes” that Fleming writes about in Diamonds Are Forever may also include vests.

Sunspel Stretch Trunk

Stretch trunk underwear from Sunspel

Underwear is a very personal garment and there’s no way we can guess the different styles of underwear that Bond has worn throughout the series apart from following what the trends were at any given time. Trends in underwear sometimes followed trends in trousers. Boxer shorts were very popular in the 1980s and 1990s when full-cut trousers were popular. However, in a 1985 episodes of Remington Steele titled “Forged Steele”, Pierce Brosnan wears white knitted cotton briefs.


The James Bond Dossier announced last month that Sunpel, who made some of Daniel Craig’s polos and t-shirts for Casino Royale, has provided their stretch cotton brief and their stretch cotton low waist trunk (a short boxer brief) for Daniel Craig to wear in Spectre. This underwear is made of a 92% cotton and 8% elastane blend so it has more stretch than a pure cotton knit. Neither the brief nor the trunk has a front opening. Briefs and trunks are necessary for Daniel Craig since loose boxer shorts would bunch up under his tight trouser legs and prevent the trousers from hanging smoothly over the thighs.

What kind of underwear do you think Bond would wear?

Stretch brief underwear from Sunspel

Stretch brief underwear from Sunspel

Layer Cake: A Navy Pinstripe Suit Jacket with Jeans


In the 2004 film Layer Cake, Daniel Craig wears striped suit jackets with jeans instead of the matching suit trousers. It was a popular fashion trend at that time, and it is still popular in some circles. Just as the mullet hairstyle has been described as “business in the front, party in the back”, wearing a pinstriped suit jacket with jeans has a similar effect. The suit jacket on the top is all business whilst the denim jeans on the bottom are as casual as trousers can be. Those who favour the mullet may see some appeal in this unorthodox combination, but like the mullet, this is not a conventionally attractive look. It’s difficult to make any tailored jacket look good with jeans, but rustic tweeds come closest since they match the rough, heavy look of denim. Robert Redford shows a great example of how to pair a tweed jacket with jeans in the 1975 film Three Days of the Condor.


Craig’s jacket in Layer Cake can by no means be called a sports coat. Sports coats are, as the name suggests, sporty, whilst pinstriped jackets are business wear and part of a suit. The main thing that separates a suit jacket from a sports coat is the cloth it is made from. Sports coats are made from a material that has texture, whether it’s tweed, hopsack, cashmere, silk, linen, corduroy or any number of other materials. These materials are either solid or have a checked pattern. Suits can also be made of any of these textured materials, but they would informal sports suits and not business suits. Business suits are typically made from smooth worsteds and sometimes flannel. They may be solid, semi-solid, striped or have a subtle check.


Certain cloths can work for both business suits and sports coats, like solid navy serge, bolder checks and woollen flannel. Jackets in these materials, however, need sporty details to make them work as sports coats, These details may include contrasting buttons, swelled edges, patch pockets or slanted pockets. But most worsteds don’t work well as odd jackets, especially not jackets with pinstripes or chalk stripes. And you can’t just put contrasting horn buttons on any suit jacket and turn it into a sports coat.

Daniel Craig’s navy pinstripe jacket is a suit jacket because it is made in a worsted business suit material. The button two jacket is tailored with straight shoulders, gently roped sleeveheads, a lean chest and a suppressed waist. It was most likely purchased ready-to-wear from an English brand. The jacket has a high button stance, straight flap pockets, four buttons on the cuffs and double vents. The jacket mostly fits well, though the sleeves are too long.


Craig wears the suit jacket with medium wash denim jeans. The jeans have a medium-low rise, five pocket design and straight legs. A wide brown belt holds up the jeans. Craig’s shoes are dark brown chelsea boots.

Craig wears two different shirts with this outfit, a white formal shirt and a grey t-shirt. The white shirt has a tall two-button spread collar, two-button cuffs, front placket stitched 3/8″ from the edge in the traditional English fashion. The placket means that the shirt is from an English brand, and the tall collar likely signifies a brand with a slight fashion edge or a special fashion line. Craig wears the shirt tucked into his jeans.


When Craig doesn’t wear the white shirt, he wears only a grey crew neck, raglan-sleeve t-shirt under the jacket. Unlike with the white shirt, Craig does not tuck the t-shirt. Though the body of the shirt drapes over Craig’s body, the short sleeves fit tightly around his upper arm. Though t-shirts go well with jeans, it makes the suit jacket look even more out of place with the jeans. T-shirts have a practical disadvantage with tailored jackets. Whilst shirts with a collar and long sleeves protect the jacket from the body’s oils and shedding, t-shirts offer the jacket not protection. Because jackets are considerably more expensive than shirts are, it makes sense to protect them.