About Matt Spaiser

I am a graphic designer in New York. If you have any questions about James Bond's clothing feel free to send me an e-mail.

Basted for Bond: Examining George Lazenby’s Dimi Major Clothes

This week’s “Basted for Bond” infographic features George Lazenby’s Dimi Major jackets, trousers, waistcoats and coats. The clothes have a classic English cut with some fashionable updates for the 1960s, like a short jacket length and narrow straight-leg trousers. Jacket variations presented here include Lazenby’s dinner jacket, his wedding lounge jacket and his double-breasted blazer. His car coat and caped ulster coat are also included.

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The Spectre Trailer: Tom Ford Suits and Coats

A longer Spectre trailer was released yesterday and revealed official footage of many of the suits and coats that James Bond wears in the film. Spectre has the most varied selection of tailored clothing of the Bond series we’ve seen since Roger Moore was Bond. The clothes it features are designed by both the film’s costume designer Jany Temime and by Tom Ford. Though there are still problems with the fit, the styles of the clothes respect the history of Bond’s exquisite wardrobes over the years. Here is an overview of the tailored clothes in the film.

Blue Prince of Wales Suit with a Blue Windowpane

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This lightweight wool suit is the Tom Ford O’Connor cut, with a few updates from the suits in Skyfall. The O’Connor suit jacket, which is designed by Jany Temime, has three buttons with the narrow lapels rolled to the middle button. It has a single vent, four cuff buttons and slightly slanted hip pockets with flaps. The jacket is cut with straight shoulders and roped sleeveheads. The trousers have a flat front, slide-buckle side-adjusters, a waistband extension with a hook closure and a straight leg with turn-ups. The jacket fits tightly, but it’s not quite as tight as the suit jackets in Skyfall. The sleeves look less constricting. Unfortunately, it’s still too short and doesn’t fully-cover Daniel Craig’s buttocks. The trousers are again too tight and a little too short.

Bond wears his blue Prince of Wales check suit with a white shirt from Tom Ford. The shirt has a point collar and double cuffs. Bond’s tie is solid medium blue and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The shoes are black Crockett & Jones Norwich five-eyelet derby shoes with Dainite studded rubber soles.

Grey Herringbone Track Stripe Suit and Three-Quarter Coat

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This wool, silk and mohair suit is also made in Tom Ford’s O’Connor cut, detailed exactly the same as the blue Prince of Wales check suit. This suit is worn with two different shirts and ties. The first (below) is a white Tom Ford shirt with a point collar and double cuffs. The tie is solid medium grey and tied in a four-in-hand knot. The second shirt (above) is sky blue, made in the same style as the white shirt. With this shirt, Bond wears a solid navy tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot. Bond also wears black Crockett & Jones Norwich derby shoes with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over this suit, Bond wears a navy cashmere and silk herringbone three-quarter topcoat with a three buttons hidden under a fly front, a moleskin collar, flapped pockets, a rear vent and three cuff buttons. This kind of coat is often known as the “Crombie” coat, named for the brand who made this style popular. It’s like a chesterfield but shorter.

Blue Sharkskin Suit

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Not much is seen of this wool sharkskin suit, but it appears to be the same style as the other O’Connor suits that we see more of. Bond wears it with a solid navy tie and a white shirt with a point collar. It has either double cuffs or cocktail cuffs. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

Black Herringbone Three-Piece Suit and Greatcoat

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The black herringbone wool three-piece suit is different than the other suits in Spectre, made in Tom Ford’s Windsor cut. The Windsor is one of Tom Ford’s most popular designs. The jacket buttons two and has medium-wide peaked lapels and pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads. The jacket is detailed with straight pockets with flaps, a ticket pocket, a single vent and five cuff buttons. The Windsor jacket is slightly longer than the O’Connor jacket. The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button and four welt pockets. The trousers are similar to the O’Connor suit’s trousers but have a slightly fuller leg and no turn-ups. With this suit Bond wears a white shirt from Tom Ford that has a pinned eyelet collar and single-button cocktail cuffs. The tie is black with a subtle texture. Bond wears black Crockett & Jones Camberley double-monk boots with Dainite rubber soles with this suit.

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Over the suit, Bond wears a knee-length double-breasted greatcoat made in black brushed wool. It has eight buttons on the front with four to button, an ulster collar, slash pockets, a button-on half belt in the back, a rear vent and three cuff buttons.

Ivory Dinner Jacket

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The new Spectre trailer reveals James Bond’s first ivory dinner jacket since A View to a Kill, released 30 years ago. Not much can be seen of this ivory silk and viscose blend faille dinner jacket, but it is made in the Windsor style and has medium-wide peaked lapels. The wide peaked lapels make this dinner jacket most closely resemble Sean Connery’s ivory dinner jacket in Diamonds Are Forever. Bond wears a black cummerbund, and most likely black trousers, under the dinner jacket. The white dress shirt is from Tom Ford with a spread collar, double cuffs and a pleated front. The black diamond-point bow tie that Bond previously wears in Dr. No and Quantum of Solace returns. Compared to the bow tie in Quantum of Solace, this bow tie is pointier. Bond also wears a red boutonnière in his lapel, paying homage to Goldfinger. The muted colours of the trailer make the flower look darker and duller than it likely is in reality.

The images here have been partially colour-corrected to look more true to the actual colours of the clothes. The trailer’s colours are often muted and have a very warm cast. After Spectre is released, this blog with have more thorough reviews of all the clothing in the film.

The Persuaders: A More Conservative Charcoal Three-Piece Suit

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Though Roger Moore often dresses flamboyantly as Lord Brett Sinclair in his early 1970s television show The Persuaders, not all of his clothes are entirely adventurous or fashion-forward. One of Moore’s more conservative pieces of clothing in The Persuaders is a charcoal track-stripe three-piece suit, which he wears in eight episodes. The track stripes are pairs of white or light grey pinstripes, spaced close together. Roger Moore designed his clothes for The Persuaders, and for this one he kept the cloth more conservative. Cyril Castle, Moore’s tailor for The Saint and his first two James Bond films, made the suit.

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This cut of this suit is similar to Roger Moore’s suits in The Saint, but the jacket has been updated from the 1960s with wider, more balanced lapels and a higher button stance that gives the suit jacket a timeless look. The jacket has a very British cut with softly padded shoulders, a full chest and a nipped waist. The front buttons three with a medium low stance that has a balanced and flattering look on Roger Moore’s figure. The jacket is detailed with three buttons on the cuffs, slanted pockets and a single vent.

The suit’s waistcoat has six buttons with five to button. The bottom of the front edge starts to curve away above the bottom button, thus the bottom button and buttonhole do not line up. The waistcoat also has notched lapels and two welt pockets.

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Moore wears a gold chain from one waistcoat pocket to the other. This should mean that Moore has a pocket watch in one waistcoat pocket and a fob in the other, but Moore is wearing a gold wristwatch. Either Moore has both a wristwatch and a pocket watch, or the waistcoat’s chain is purely decorative.

The suit’s trousers are made by Cyril Castle’s trouser maker at the time, Richard Paine. They have jetted cross pocket on the front, and a dart centred on the front of each side cuts through the pocket. There is a button-through pocket on either side in the back. The trousers have a narrow straight leg, following 1960s fashion. Though Moore often dresses flamboyantly in The Persuaders, he wouldn’t adopt the flared looks that became popular in the late 60s until Live and Let Die. The trousers also have belt loops, but Moore doesn’t wear a belt, and the waistcoat keeps the belt loops covered. The trouser waist fits well enough that a belt is not needed.

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Moore’s lilac poplin shirt, made by Frank Foster, has a spread collar, a plain front and button-down cocktail cuffs that fasten with a single button. Lilac shirts are very versatile, and the colour flatters Moore’s warm complexion. The tie is navy with sets of wide cream, champagne and gold stripes, and it is tied in a four-in-hand knot. The shoes are black monk shoes with an apron front.

Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Brioni Clothes

Daniel Craig wears Brioni suits in only one James Bond film: Casino Royale. The latest “Basted for Bond” infographic features Craig’s Brioni clothes, updated from Pierce Brosnan’s. Though Craig’s Brioni suit jackets still have the same strong Roman shoulders that Brosnan’s suits have, Craig’s jackets have a closer fit through the body. The trousers, on the other hand, have a fuller cut through the leg. The jackets’ button stance is higher than normal like on Brosnan’s jackets in Die Another Day, but the gorge (the seam where the lapels are stitched to the collar) is now also higher. The higher button stance and higher gorge followed the fashion trends of the day, but it wouldn’t be until a few years later that mainstream fashion would raise the jacket’s hem as well. Variations presented in this infographic include the peaked lapel suit jacket and the dinner jacket and trousers.

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Is the Casino Royale Three-Piece Suit a Copy of the Goldfinger Suit?

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I don’t know who started this, but the following quote ended up in Casino Royale‘s trivia section on IMDB: “The three-piece suit worn by James Bond at the end of the film is a navy version of the gray suit worn by Sean Connery in Goldfinger.” Others have repeated this.

Like the iconic grey glen check suit made by Anthony Sinclair that Sean Connery wears in Goldfinger, the Brioni navy pinstripe suit that Daniel Craig wears in the final scene of Casino Royale is also a three-piece suit. And that’s where the similarities end. Both suits are excellent suits, but the basic styles of the suit are different, the silhouettes are different and the small details that make the Goldfinger suit so unique are absent from the Casino Royale suit.

The Goldfinger suit jacket has two buttons on the front whilst the Casino Royale suit jacket has three buttons. The Goldfinger suit jacket is cut with soft shoulders and a full chest whilst the Casino Royale suit jacket is cut with stronger straight shoulders and a lean chest. The Goldfinger suit jacket has a ticket pocket whilst the Casino Royale suit jacket does not. The Casino Royale jacket has wider lapels. Both jackets have straight pockets with flaps and four buttons on the cuffs, and the Casino Royale jacket may also have double vents like the Goldfinger suit, but those details aren’t all that special since that’s what the average suit has.

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The waistcoat in Goldfinger has six buttons with only five to button, whilst the waistcoat in Casino Royale is cut with all buttons able to fasten. The waistcoat in Goldfinger has four welt pockets whilst the waistcoat in Casino Royale has only two. The trousers in Goldfinger have double forward pleats, plain hems andside adjusters whilst the trousers in Casino Royale have darts and turn-ups and are worn with a belt. The Goldfinger suit’s trouser legs are narrow and tapered whilst the Casino Royale suit’s trouser legs are wide and straight.

What makes the glen check suit in Goldfinger special? Apart from it being the first three-piece suit of the Bond series, it’s Sean Connery’s only three-piece suit that has lapels on the waistcoat. Pierce Brosnan brought back the lapelled waistcoat with his pinstripe suit in The World Is Not Enough. This key detail, however, is absent from the three-piece suit in Casino Royale. The absence of lapels on the waistcoat is the most significant detail that shows the Casino Royale suit was hardly inspired by the Goldfinger suit.

Magnoli Clothiers, who makes clothes inspired by the clothes James Bond wears, also says the Casino Royale suit “was based loosely on Sean Connery’s classic Goldfinger Suit.” Magnoli adds a ticket pocket and side adjusters to his version of the suit to make it resemble Connery’s suit more, but those details are not present on the actual Casino Royale suit.

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Even when people attempt to truly copy the grey three-piece Goldfinger suit, they get it wrong. An attempt at copying the Goldfinger suit was done in Catch Me if You Can, but the suit in that film was made in the wrong pattern, and the style was either Americanised or modernised with squarer shoulders, wider lapels, shorter vents and medium-rise flat front trousers. At least they got two of the Goldfinger suit’s key details: a ticket pocket and lapels on the waistcoat.

James Bond has so far worn 20 three-piece suits in the series, with more coming in Spectre, and the three-piece suit in Casino Royale is no more a copy of the Goldfinger suit than it is of most of the other 18 three-piece suits. Costume designer Lindy Hemming may have wanted to put James Bond in a three-piece suit that could be iconic on the level of the Goldfinger suit, but the significance of the suit doesn’t mean the actual suits have much in common. The Goldfinger suit is iconic because it is not only a very unusual suit, but it also has a significant reveal with James Bond exiting the aeroplane lavatory. The reveal of the Casino Royale suit comes along with the introduction of a more confident and mature 007, and the suit has significance in the character development.

If Daniel Craig’s navy pinstripe three-piece suit could be compared to another suit in the Bond series, it has most in common with George Lazenby’s three-piece navy chalkstripe suit in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Though the Italian cut of Craig’s Brioni suit is considerably different from Lazenby’s thoroughly British Dimi Major suit, the details and overall styles are very similar. The most obvious thing is that both suits are navy with stripes. Both suit jackets button three down the front, and neither jacket has a ticket pocket. Both suits’ trousers have a darted front and a straight leg, though Lazenby’s trouser legs are considerably narrower than Craig’s trouser legs. Sean Connery’s navy three-piece suit in Diamonds Are Forever also has a few things in common with the Casino Royale suit, such as the lack of a ticket pocket, a full six-button waistcoat and darted-front trousers, though Connery’s jacket only has two buttons and his trouser legs are tapered.

To give a definitive answer to the question posed in the title of this article, no, the Casino Royale three-piece suit is by no means a copy of the Goldfinger suit. If someone was trying to copy any suit from Goldfinger, they did a very poor job. That doesn’t mean there is something wrong with the Casino Royale suit, it is just a very different three-piece suit.

Basted for Bond: Examining Pierce Brosnan’s Brioni Clothes

The next “Basted for Bond” infographic examines the cuts and details of Pierce Brosnan’s Brioni jackets, trousers, waistcoats and coats that he wears in GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. The main jacket example is based on the middle-of-the-road jackets Brosnan wears in The World Is Not Enough, his best-dressed film. There are special jacket variations for the longer and looser suit jacket in GoldenEye and Tomorrow Never Dies, the double-breasted blazer in GoldenEye, the button one suit jacket in The World Is Not Enough, the linen suit jackets in The World Is Not Enough (with patch pockets) and Die Another Day (with swelled edges) and others. Double pleated, triple pleated and darted trousers are represented, as are five different waistcoat styles that Brosnan wears throughout his first three Bond films, including the unique five-button double-breasted evening waistcoat from Tomorrow Never Dies. Daniel Craig’s Brioni clothes from Casino Royale will be displayed separately.

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Basted for Bond: Examining Anthony Sinclair

“Basted for Bond” is a new series of infographics that examines the cuts and details of the jackets, trousers, waistcoats and coats made by the different tailors who have made clothes for James Bond. The first of the series examines the clothes of Sean Connery’s tailor Anthony Sinclair. The illustrations below account for almost all of the different styles that Sinclair made for Connery throughout his six Bond films, with variations for dinner jackets, blazers, sports coats and more. Please enjoy below.

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