About Matt Spaiser

I am a graphic designer in New York. If you have any questions about James Bond's clothing feel free to send me an e-mail.

James Bond and Double Cuffs


Rounded double cuffs in Goldfinger

The double cuff, also known as the French cuff, is a type of shirt cuff that folds back on itself and fastens with cufflinks. The double cuff is the most formal type of cuff after the single-link cuff, which also fastens with cufflinks but only has a stiff single layer. For the double cuff to fold over neatly, it needs to have a light and soft interfacing, either fused or sewn. A heavy or stiff interfacing won’t fold over as nicely, and the reason for the cuff folding is to give the cuff stability without the stiffness of the single cuff. Double cuffs should always be fastened in the kissing position and never overlapping like a button cuff.

Double cuffs on a Tom Ford shirt in Quantum of Solace

Square double cuffs on a Tom Ford shirt in Quantum of Solace

The formality of the double cuff makes it the standard cuff on shirts for black tie, though cocktail cuffs are also appropriate with black tie. Double cuffs are a minimum requirement for morning dress, but single-link cuffs are a dressier option. Double cuffs are also appropriate with any suit for any occasion. They pair nicely with blazers and most sports coats as well. The formality of double cuffs, however, demands a tie. They should not be worn in a casual environment.

Double cuffs vary primarily in two ways: the corner style and the placement of the link-holes. Most double cuffs have a square corner. They may also have rounded corners or mitred (angle-cut) corners, and typically this describes the corner at the back edge of the cuff and not the folded edge. Rounded cuffs have the benefit of sliding through jacket cuffs more smoothly. Double cuffs may be styled in other ways, such as with a mitred corner at the fold or with a contoured back edge, but these are fussier and less traditional designs.

Rounded double cuffs in For Your Eyes Only

Rounded double cuffs on a Frank Foster shirt in For Your Eyes Only

Though double cuffs with square corners are technically the most formal, practically there is no difference. Any style of double cuff can be worn the same way. Bond has worn square, mitred and rounded double cuffs with black tie, and he has worn square and rounded double cuffs with his suits. The mitred cuffs on his dress shirts in Goldfinger have unusually large mitred corners.

Notice the large mitred corner on the double cuff

Notice the large mitred corner on the double cuff in Goldfinger

The placement of the link-holes has varied on Bond’s double cuffs. On Bond’s British shirts from Turnbull & Asser and Frank Foster, the link-holes are placed close to the fold, which shows off the cufflinks and gives the cuff both flare and flair. On Bond’s Sulka, Brioni and Tom Ford shirts, the link-holes are centred on the cuffs. This prevents the cuffs from flaring out, meaning they’re less likely to get stuck inside a jacket sleeve. This link-hole placement has the downside of hiding the cufflinks further inside the jacket sleeves.

From Dr. No through Licence to Kill, James Bond almost exclusively wears double cuffs with black tie and other formal wear. Goldfinger is the exception, where Bond also wears double cuffs with his suits and sports coats. Starting with GoldenEye, Bond almost always has worn double cuff shirts with his suits as well.

James Bond breaks the rules in Quantum of Solace when he wears a shirt with double cuffs with his shawl-collar cardigan, but the results are less than favourable. Not only do formal double cuffs clash with this casual ensemble, they bind under a snug knitted cuff.


A double cuff shirt from Tom Ford under a shawl-collar cardigan in Quantum of Solace

Basted for Bond: Examining Roger Moore’s Angelo Roma Clothes

A new “Basted for Bond” infographic breaks down the wide-lapelled jackets, flared trousers and waistcoat that Roger Moore wears in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, made by legendary Roman tailor Angelo Vitucci. Most of Angelo’s suit jackets are made in a button two style with wide lapels reflecting the fashion trends of the 1970s. Both single and double-breasted blazers, a double-breasted dinner jacket, a single-button suit jacket variation and a safari sports coat.


A Nylon-Front Blouson and Ski Trousers in Solden


For a snowy mountain adventure in Solden, Austria in Spectre, James Bond wears an elegant outfit of a nylon-front blouson, a mock turtleneck and vintage-inspired ski trousers. The zip-front blouson from Tom Ford is knitted with a fine rib in dark grey merino wool with elasticised cuffs and a mock turtleneck collar. The front of the blouson, however, is blue nylon with 12 large, down-filled ribs. There is a zipped slash pocket on either side of the front.

Under the blouson, Bond wears a mock turtleneck jumper from N.Peal in “Lapis Blue”. It is made from a fine gauge 70% cashmere and 30% silk blend. The collar, cuffs and hem are knitted in a fine rib. The warm, rich blue is flattering to Daniel Craig’s warm complexion, and the bit of blue that shows from beneath the blouson’s collar brings the needed contrast to the dark shades of the rest of the outfit. The warm colour of the jumper is more like cerulean than a true lapis blue.


Costume designer Jany Temime spoke to Bloomberg Business about the black ski trousers, which Tom Ford calls the “Sky Pant”:

Those were based off French army ski trousers, 1960s ski trousers. I took them to Tom Ford, and he made them for us. It was very old fashioned the way he did it, with the same look.

Since they are based on 1960s trousers, the “Sky Pant” does not have the slim fit of all the other trousers than Bond wears in Spectre. They are tailored from a heavy brushed wool, woven in a pronounced steep twill. At the front there are double forward pleats. The pleats are stitched down roughly two inches at the top about half a centimetre into the pleat. It’s not uncommon for pleats to be stitched down for the first inch or two at the top to help them lay more neatly, but they’re ordinarily stitched down at the edge of the pleat. By stitching down the pleat away from the edge, the sharp edge of the pleat is continued up to the waistband for a less interrupted look whilst still benefitting from being stitched at the top.


On each side of the trousers forward of the side seams is an offset side pocket with rearward-facing flaps that fasten down with a button. There is a a jetted pocket on either side of the rear. The legs are tapered and have stirrups and expanding gussets at the bottom. The trousers have belt loops, but we don’t see if Bond wears a belt with them.

Though the trousers are designed for skiing, James Bond does not ski in Spectre. These may be very stylish, but there are better modern alternatives for actual skiing. If they get wet, the elegant crease down each leg would disappear!


Bond wears the trousers tucked into black Danner Mountain Light II 5″ boots. The boots lace with five pairs of lugs to the toe and two pairs of speed hooks at the top for a secure fit. The boots are made of one piece with leather plus a counter up the back. They have Vibram rubber soles with yellow cleats. Bond wears heavy grey socks folded over the top, meaning the trousers are worn inside the socks as well.

Bond’s sunglasses are from Vuarnet with black leather shields on the sides. The quilted black gloves are made by Agnelle.

How James Bond Wears a Suit for Evenings Out


A midnight blue suit at a cocktail party in Quantum of Solace

Though James Bond is known for wearing black tie in the evening, most people don’t regularly attend such formal events. Bond sometimes goes out for less formal occasions at night, but what does he wear when he still needs to look his best? He wears a suit, naturally. When wearing a suit socially, such as for a cocktail party, an evening at a night club or a special dinner, one must look like they are dressed for pleasure and not for business. Stripes are usually a bad choice for this reason. Checks are great for social occasions, but they aren’t usually dressy enough for the evening unless the check is very subtle. Bond never wears a three-piece suit for evenings out, though in the right cloth a three-piece suit can be a great choice.


Bond having dinner in a lustrous charcoal suit in The Man with the Golden Gun

The cloth is what separates a social suit from a business suit. The cut of a suit or how many buttons it has doesn’t matter as much as the cloth. Darks suits, especially in blue, work best. The richer colour looks best under artificial light at night. Greys and browns are duller and don’t look as good at night, but in darker shades they can work well in the evening. Though worsteds are perfectly fine, luxurious cloths with a sheen, like mohair and silk, can also help differentiate a social suit from a business suit. Flannel can be a good choice for a casual evening out, like with the charcoal flannel suit Bond wears to dinner at the Roma camp in From Russia with Love.

Marine Blue Suit

A marine blue suit at a nightclub in The Man with the Golden Gun

The marine blue suit that Bond wears in The Man with the Golden Gun when at a nightclub in Beirut has a sheen that suggests mohair, making it perfect for both warm weather and for the club. Also in The Man with the Golden Gun, Bond wears a charcoal mini-herringbone suit that has a lustrous sheen for a dinner with Goodnight. Charcoal doesn’t isn’t as dressy as blue is in the evening, but with a sheen it’s an appropriate choice.

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

James Bond wears a navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes in Casino Royale

Though pinstripes aren’t the best choice for the evening, sometimes they work. When meeting Vesper for drinks on the train in Casino Royale, Bond wears a very dark navy suit with subtle grey pinstripes. Because these stripes are hardly noticeable, they don’t give the suit a business-like impression. However, his drinks are in a business setting with a bank liaison, making the pinstripes quite appropriate.

In Quantum of Solace (pictured top), Bond wears the easiest choice for a cocktail party: a midnight blue suit. Though black suits can work well for such an occasion, a midnight blue suit is infinitely more sophisticated. Being mohair tonic separates this suit even further from business suits, and the sheen raises the suit’s formality.


Bond dressed in a shiny grey pick-and-pick suit for the Junkanoo in Thunderball

In warm weather, both dark and light suits can work for the evening. In Dr. No, Bond wears a light grey mohair suit at Puss Feller’s nightclub in Jamaica, though Bond donned the suit earlier in the day. The sheen makes it look great at night. In Thunderball, Bond wears a light grey pick-and-pick mohair suit that also works perfectly for a hot evening out at the Junkanoo in the Bahamas. When Bond dresses up for the evening in warm locations and doesn’t wear a suit, he chooses a navy blazer. The navy blazer is the dressiest of sports coats and has many similarities to navy suit jackets. In the context of this article, the dark colour makes the navy blazer look good at night. Bond wears a navy blazer for his date with Miss Taro in Dr. No and at the Junkanoo in Thunderball.

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro

Bond wears a navy blazer on his date with Miss Taro in Dr, No

When accessorising, simplicity and contrast are key for these outfits. The elements are usually a dark suit, a light shirt and a solid or subtly patterned tie. The best shirt for the evening is solid white, like what Bond wears to the cocktail party in Quantum of Solace. Light blue can give the ensemble a friendlier look. Striped shirts are okay, so long as there aren’t multiple colours. Ties should be dark, like navy with all of Connery’s evening outfits; vivid, like the burgundy tie Moore wears with the marine blue suit in The Man with the Golden Gun; or lustrous, like Moore’s satin ties. The shinier a tie the dressier it is, and satin ties should be worn exclusively in the evening. Subtle patterns like on Daniel Craig’s ties are also great for the evening.

The Spy-Wear Collection: A Collaboration with Oliver Wicks


The Suits of James Bond collaborated with online made-to-measure clothier Oliver Wicks to create a line of clothes inspired by James Bond called the Spy-Wear Collection. I chose six different cloths for suits plus a midnight blue (called navy) for a dinner suit and an ivory for a dinner jacket that can be purchased with black trousers. All of the cloths are woven in England or Italy, and the suits are made in Europe. The suitings include three blue and three grey in the classic Bond tradition.

The greys include a pick-and-pick, which Sean Connery wore on occasion in his Bond films and which Daniel Craig brought back to great popularity in Skyfall, as well as a glen check and a charcoal flannel, which were favourites of Sean Connery’s Bond. The blues include a navy pick-and-pick, similar to what Daniel Craig wears in Morocco in Spectre and can be seen on posters for the film. There is also a navy herringbone, which recalls the suits Daniel Craig wears at the end of Skyfall and George Lazenby wears to the office in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, and a navy chalkstripe, which most of the Bonds have worn.


For an extra Bond touch in the Spy-Wear Collection, the suit jackets have roped sleeveheads and the trousers have side adjusters. You can get them in a classic two-button, in a three-roll-two button arrangement like Daniel Craig’s suits in Spectre have, or in any other classic arrangement. Oliver Wicks offer an impressive range of lapel styles, from narrow notched lapels to medium-wide peaked lapels for a Tom Ford-like style. The suits have quality corozo buttons. All of the options on the suits are customisable, and Oliver Wicks offers many options. I like the way they do their slanted pockets, which have a gentle slant similar to what Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall and Spectre have.

Oliver Wicks has a great system for getting the right fit. They provide detailed measurement instructions and will review the measurements you provide to make sure they make sense. They also cover up to US$125 of alteration costs because they understand that there is still room for error when purchasing custom clothing online. Their standard trousers have a curved waistband, which works well if you like modern low rise trousers. If you prefer a more traditional trouser cut, as I do, you can make that request. It comes with a straighter and wider waistband, like on Daniel Craig’s suit trousers from Tom Ford.

The suit jackets come standard with working buttons on the cuffs, but I advise against this on the first suit. It can be difficult to know how long the sleeves need to be on the first try because different types of shoulder construction will mean different sleeve lengths, and if the sleeves end up too short they cannot be lengthened if they have working buttons.


To complete the Bond look, there are five grenadine ties in navy, burgundy, platinum, air force blue and black (not yet available). The ties are three inches wide, which can work with both suits with fashionable narrower lapels and suits with a traditional lapel width. The navy grenadine tie is the ultimate Bond tie—being Connery’s favourite in his Bond films—and is an easy match with any of the suits in the collection. The grenadine silk is the garza grossa (large) weave from Fermo Fossati, who provides the same grenadine silk for most of the top brands. These ties are made from the wrong side of the silk for a more pronounced texture, just like Turnbull & Asser does for their grenadine ties. At US$49, the grenadine ties are an excellent value for this essential to any Bond fan’s wardrobe.

The collection also includes three shirts in beautiful cloths by Tessitura Monti that I chose. There are white and light blue cotton poplins plus a white-on-white stripe that can be worn with the dinner jackets or with regular suits. I recommend the cutaway collar for the look of a classic English spread collar.

You can find out more about Oliver Wicks’ Spy-Wear Collection at oliverwicks.com

The Differences Between the Skyfall and Spectre Tom Ford O’Connor Suits

The Tom Ford O'Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

The Tom Ford O’Connor jacket in Skyfall, left, and in Spectre, right

Costume designer Jany Temime updated the style of the Tom Ford O’Connor suit for Spectre from her and Tom Ford’s original design made for Skyfall. The style changes are easy change to identify, and the biggest difference is the lapel roll. Both suits have three buttons, but whilst the lapel ends just below the top button on the Skyfall jackets, the lapels rolls to the middle button and completely over the top button on the Spectre suits. This is known as a three-roll-two. The lower foreparts—or quarters—of the Spectre jackets are more cutaway than on the Skyfall jackets, but this results in a triangle of shirt showing between the fastened jacket button and top of the trousers. This is not a problem with the jacket but rather a problem with the trousers’ low rise. The lapel roll and quarters on the Spectre suit jackets emphasise the silhouette’s dramatic shape better than the straighter button three front of the Skyfall suit jackets does.

The Spectre O’Connor jackets have four buttons on the cuffs instead of the three buttons that are on the cuffs of the Skyfall jackets. The other details of the jackets are the same: straight shoulders, roped sleeveheads, gently slanted pockets and single vents.

The suit jackets in Spectre fit a little different from the suit jackets in Skyfall, but the jackets in both films share many of the same fit problems. The jackets are all fashionably short and have too much waist suppression. In comparison to the Skyfall jackets, the Spectre jackets have a fuller chest, wider shoulders and fuller sleeves. The tighter chest on the Skyfall jackets pulls open, and the narrower shoulders de-emphasise Daniel Craig’s herculean form. These fit comparisons are based on the fit of the jacket in comparison to Craig’s body.

The measurements of the jackets in both films may actually be the same, and because Daniel Craig is no longer so brawny, the jackets in Spectre may look fuller in the upper torso . His slimmer, but still fit, build in Spectre gives the suits an easier fit up top. Whilst the jackets in Skyfall look like they are a full size too small, the jackets in Spectre look like they are the right size (defined by the chest and shoulders) but just have too much waist suppression in the wrong places. Rather than the “shrunken” or “bursting out” look of Skyfall, the suit jackets in Spectre only look poorly shaped at the waist. It’s a slight improvement.

There’s nothing wrong with a closely fitted suit, but to be a well-fitting suit it needs to smoothly follow the contours of the body. Daniel Craig’s suits in both Skyfall and Spectre do not do a good job of following his figure. If the goal is to show off Craig’s physique, a suit that perfectly follows his body with smooth, clean lines will show it off better than a suit with a distorted shape and stressed creasing.

The suit trousers didn’t change much from Skyfall to Spectre. In both films they have a low rise, which seems even lower because the trousers tend to sag down. The trousers are made in the same style in both films, with a wide extended waistband, slide-buckle side-adjusters, side seams curved forward at the top with on-seam pockets, narrow straight legs and turn-ups. The trousers in Spectre were hemmed a bit shorter than they were in Skyfall.

Daniel Craig wears four Tom Ford O’Connor suits in Spectre: a two-piece blue and black Prince of Wales check with a light blue windowpane, a two-piece grey herringbone with a track stripe, a two-piece blue sharkskin and a three-piece anthracite pin point damier check. All of Daniel Craig’s suits in Skyfall were made in the O’Connor style.

James Bond Brings Back the Turtleneck

Spectre Teaser Poster

If Daniel Craig’s fashion sense is anything to go on, the turtleneck has boldly returned. Craig had the power to return shawl collar cardigans to the forefront of fashion after wearing them as James Bond in Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace, and he will no doubt do the same for the turtleneck after wearing three in Spectre.

The turtleneck, also known as the polo neck or roll neck, is a knitted jumper that has a close-fitting high collar that rolls over to cover the neck all around. An alternative to the turtleneck is the shorter and more modern mock turtleneck, which does not fold over. Turtlenecks saw their heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, while mock turtlenecks ruled in the 1990s. Both the true turtleneck and the mock turtleneck are returning in Spectre.


Daniel Craig wears a dark charcoal grey fine gauge mock turtleneck made of cashmere and silk from British company N.Peal on the teaser poster for Spectre with charcoal tick-patterned trousers and a shoulder holster. This look immediately recalls the 1973 film Live and Let Die, in which Roger Moore wears a black full turtleneck with black trousers and shoulder holster. Craig’s dark grey version better flatters his fair complexion and adds more subtle interest in updating the look. In the film, Craig will be wearing a dark blue-grey suede Racer Jacket from John Varvatos over the mock turtleneck to conceal his gun.

Both Daniel Craig in Spectre and Roger Moore in Live and Let Die were inspired to wear this look after Steve McQueen famously wore a dark blue turtleneck sweater with a shoulder holster as police lieutenant Frank Bullitt in the 1968 film Bullitt. This look is only seen briefly at the end of the film since he is usually wearing a brown herringbone, elbow-patched tweed jacket to hide his gun and holster. Bullitt‘s poster and publicity stills, which are without the jacket, are what made the look so iconic. Not only does Daniel Craig copy McQueen’s turtleneck and shoulder holster look in Spectre, but he also wears the same brown suede Sanders & Sanders “Playboy” chukka boots that McQueen wears in Bullitt.


Steve McQueen in Bullitt

Before Steve McQueen wore the turtleneck and holster in Bullitt, it was a popular look for agents in the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Robert Vaughn first wore this look as Napoleon Solo in the 1965 episode “The Four-Steps Affair”, but David McCallum’s character Illya Kuryakin is more famous for the look and first wore it in the following episode “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”.


David McCallum as Illya Kuryakin in “The See-Paris-and-Die Affair”

Besides the charcoal grey mock turtleneck, Daniel Craig wears another mock turtleneck in Spectre under a dark grey nylon-front knitted wool blouson from Tom Ford while on his mission in snowy Austria. This example, which is also from N.Peal, is identical to the dark charcoal grey piece, except it is made in a vivid medium shade of blue called “Lapis Blue”.

Daniel Craig wears a third turtleneck in Spectre from N.Peal in a colour they call “Fumo Grey”, which is a light and warm shade of grey. This turtleneck is the more traditional full roll-neck style and is designed for warmth. It is cable-knitted and in a heavier Mongolian cashmere. Craig wears it under a heavy navy wool zip-front blouson in the Austrian Alps.


N.Peal turtleneck in “Fumo Grey” from Spectre

Spectre and Live and Let Die are not the only two James Bond films to feature turtlenecks. Sean Connery introduced the mock turtleneck to the Bond in the 1967 film You Only Live Twice when he wears a grey top to infiltrate the SPECTRE volcano headquarters. Sean Connery wears full turtlenecks in Diamond Are Forever with his brown tweed jackets. In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, George Lazenby wears orange and white turtlenecks as part of his golf and ski outfits, respectively.

Roger Moore undoubtedly holds the status as the turtleneck James Bond. In The Spy Who Loved Me he wears a navy turtleneck as part of his naval battle dress, and in Moonraker he wears a cream turtleneck under a double-breasted navy blazer. The 1981 Bond film For Your Eyes Only is tied with Spectre for featuring the most turtlenecks. In this film, Moore wears his turtlenecks under a shearling blouson and a ski jacket in the Italian Alps as well as under a lightweight blouson in Greece. Until Spectre, Die Another Day was the last Bond film to feature a turtleneck. Pierce Brosnan wears a heavy cashmere cable-knit mock turtleneck from the Scottish company Ballantyne, now liquidated, in the 2002 film.

Bond's last turtleneck in Die Another Day

Bond’s last turtleneck in Die Another Day

This article was originally published in 20 Minuten.