Largo’s Charcoal Suit and Camel Coat

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The always well-tailored Emilio Largo, played by Adolfo Celi, is introduced in Thunderball wearing a charcoal three-piece suit. The suit is probably made of worsted flannel since it has a fuzzy nap but doesn’t look as heavy as the typical flannel. The button three jacket is tailored with very strong, straight shoulders and a clean chest. The narrow lapels gently roll over the top button. The jacket also has jetted pockets, three-button cuffs and no vent. The overall cut as well as the stylistic details are all very characteristic of a continental suit. Since the jacket has little fullness in the chest or flare at the shirt, it doesn’t look like an English suit. And neither the Italian character Largo nor the Italian actor Adolfo Celi would have likely used an English tailor. An Italian tailor would most likely have made this suit.

Largo-Charcoal-Suit-2Little is seen of the waistcoat and trousers. Since the top button of the waistcoat isn’t particularly high, I would guess that the waistcoat has five buttons. The trousers have a tapered leg with turn-ups. They are probably pleated, and I would guess they have reverse pleats since the suit is likely of Italian origin. The Italian tailors almost always make their trousers with reverse pleats.

Largo’s cream shirt has a spread collar and double cuffs. He uses a four-in-hand knot to tie his black tie with white polka dots. His socks and shoes are black.

Largo-Charcoal-Suit-3Over the suit Largo wears a three-quarter-length camelhair coat. The button three coat has notched lapels, swelled edges, turnback cuffs and a single vent. He wears the coat draped over his shoulders as if it were a cape, and I wouldn’t recommend wearing a coat in such a manner since that seems like something only a flamboyant villain would do. He also wears his charcoal trilby like a dandy: tilted and with the brim turned up all the way around. The hat’s crown has a centre dent and a front pinch, and the roughly 2 1/4″ brim has a sewn overwelt. His cream leather gloves take his outerwear yet another step further into flamboyance.

Woman of Straw: The Charcoal Flannel Suit and Navy Overcoat

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It’s time again to look at one of Sean Connery’s Goldfinger suits in its original setting in Woman of Straw. Both Goldfinger and Woman of Straw end with Sean Connery in the same charcoal grey woollen flannel, three-piece suit. This slightly rustic suit does just as well in Woman of Straw‘s country setting as it does in Goldfinger‘s dressier setting of Bond on his way to meet the president. It’s Connery’s usual Anthony Sinclair suit. The button two jacket has natural shoulders with roped sleeveheads, a full chest and a nipped waist. It has four buttons on the cuffs, jetted pockets and no vent. The waistcoat has six buttons with five to button, though Connery fastens the bottom button. Because the bottom button is not meant to close, the bottom of the waistcoat bunches up rather unattractively. The trousers have double forward pleats and button side adjusters.

Woman-of-Straw-Grey-Flannel-Suit-2The shirt and tie differ slightly from what Sean Connery wears in Goldfinger. The elegant white shirt has a self-stripe pattern, which is either created by a mini-herringbone weave or a fancy white-on-white weave. Due to the country context the mini-herringbone is more likely since it’s not as formal as a white-on-white stripe. The shirt has a spread collar, front placket and double cuffs with rounded corners. The black satin tie is a little formal for a woollen flannel suit, but at the same time it creates a pleasant contrast with the texture of the flannel suit. It is tied in a small four-in-hand knot. Like in Goldfinger, Connery wears a white linen handkerchief in his breast pocket, but here it’s folded in a single point instead of in a TV fold. His shoes are black.

Woman-of-Straw-Navy-OvercoatSean Connery wears two stylish double-breasted overcoats in Woman of Straw that didn’t make it into Goldfinger. Over this charcoal flannel suit he wears a very dark navy double-breasted, knee-length overcoat. It has six buttons with three to button, narrow notched lapels and slanted hip pockets. The overcoat is cut with natural shoulders, has set-in sleeves and is slightly shaped through the body. There’s no name for this style of overcoat, but nevertheless it is a very elegant coat. With the overcoat Connery has a dark hat with a white lining, but it’s difficult to what type of hat it is or what colour it is. A trilby would be most likely considering the relative informality of the coat and flannel suit, and it could be the same brown trilby that Connery wears in Goldfinger or one similar to it.

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The Basic Navy Overcoat

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In Quantum of Solace, Daniel Craig wears a navy wool overcoat over his charcoal suit in London. The single-breasted knee-length coat has a similar look to the suit jackets in the film with some of the same details. Like the suit jacket underneath, the overcoat has pagoda shoulders with roped sleeveheads, and the shoulders are fairly large so they fit comfortably over the suit jacket. The coat buttons three and has a very low button stance with the buttons spaced closer together than is typical. The lower button stance combined with the wide lapels looks very elegant, but it’s not as practical in keeping out the cold. This coat could benefit from a fly front, which would make it look even more elegant, but without the fly front it’s a little more versatile and can be worn less formally.

The front is darted and the waist is suppressed to give the overcoat an athletic silhouette. The coat has straight flap pockets with a ticket pocket, another detail that matches the suit jacket. It also has the same “barchetta” breast pocket, an Italian touch that Tom Ford puts on his rather English-styled clothes. The cuffs button four and there is a centre vent in back. Daniel Craig wears the coat open, which would mean he’s not cold enough to button up the coat. It could also be that he had it unbuttoned in the car and left it in that state, since a long buttoned coat can be cumbersome and quite warm in a heated car.

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Navy Topcoat

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Daniel Craig wears an elegant, though somewhat unremarkable, navy topcoat from Tom Ford in Skyfall over his glen check and navy herringbone suits. At a three-quarter length, it’s like a longer, heavier suit jacket that isn’t cut away in front. It has three buttons to show on front, but Daniel Craig fastens only the middle button like a suit jacket in the topcoat’s first appearance. He fastens the middle and bottom buttons in the topcoat’s second appearance. It’s difficult to tell if Daniel Craig is leaving buttons open as a fashion statement or because the coat is too tight to comfortably close the top button. It doesn’t look bad the way he wears it, but at the same time it looks affected. If he’s wearing a topcoat because it’s cold outside, why not make the most of the coat and fasten all of the buttons? Unlike on a button three lounge coat (a.k.a. suit jacket), the buttons on an overcoat fall in a straight line. Thus visually the straight line is preserved by either fastening all of the buttons, like how Connery wears his topcoat in Thunderball, or fastening none, like Pierce Brosnan does in GoldenEye.

Navy-Topcoat-3The coat is cut with straight and narrow shoulders, and the front is darted for a shaped silhouette. The cuffs button three, and like on his suit jacket, Daniel Craig leaves the last button open. The coat has straight, flapped pockets, a welted breast pocket and a deep single vent. Whilst it’s a very nice coat, a fly that hides the buttons could have made this a more elegant coat.

With the coat’s second appearance on a London rooftop, Craig wears black leather gloves and a medium grey cashmere scarf in a parisian knot. The parisian knot is tied by folding the scarf in half, draping it over the neck and inserting the dangling ends of the scarf together through the loop created at the folded end. The parisian knot works best with longer, lighter scarves. Folding the scarf in half takes up a lot of length, and in a heavier scarf the knot can end up very bulky. Bulkiness, however, can be a benefit in very cold weather. The parisian knot is an easy and effective way to wear the scarf, and Craig tucks the ends into his coat. The scarf and gloves show that this is a colder scene than the earlier one, and Craig also flips up his collar for extra protection from the cold. But again, if it’s that cold outside why does he leave the top button open? The most logical reason would be that the topcoat is too small—like most of the tailored clothes in Skyfall—to properly close.

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Happy Anniversary 007: Tan Trench Coat and Navy Suit

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Though Roger Moore only carries a trench coat as James Bond in For Your Eyes Only, in the 1987 James Bond retrospective Happy Anniversary 007 he properly wears a trench coat. Moore wears many trench coats thought his films and television shows, and this is the second one in Happy Anniversary 007. The first is made of corduroy, whilst this one is made of tan cotton gaberdine. It’s a classic trench coat: full length below the knee with raglan sleeves. It is double-breasted with ten buttons and has shoulder straps, a yoke across the upper back, a storm flap on the front right, and a self belt and wrist straps that close with a leather buckles. Moore keeps his hands warm inside the slash pockets and wears a heavy grey scarf draped around his neck underneath the coat.

Happy-Anniversary-Trench-Coat-2Underneath the trench coat Moore wears what appears to be a navy suit, of which here we can only see the bottoms of the trousers. His blue and white striped shirt has a spread collar and 1-button rounded cuffs. Though we don’t see enough of the shirt to be able to tell if it’s one of his Frank Foster shirts, the spread collar already makes it a nicer shirt than the point-collar shirt he wears earlier with a navy blazer. We also don’t get to see much of the navy tie, but it has a slightly chunky texture that might suggest a knitted wool or cashmere tie.  As Bond, Moore follows English tradition and always wears black shoes with his navy suits, but here he follows the continental and American practice of wearing dark brown slip-ons with navy.

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Back to the navy suit that Moore wears under the trench coat, it’s probably the same navy suit that Moore wears at the beginning of Happy Anniversary 007. This suit is a typical Douglas Hayward single-breasted suit with natural shoulders—which were very out of fashion by 1987—and probably two buttons. He wears it with a pale blue shirt that has a moderate spread collar with edge stitching and rounded 1-button cuffs. It’s not a Frank Foster shirt, but it is almost certainly high street ready-to-wear of a lower quality than we’ve come to expect from both Roger Moore and James Bond. His grey tie with black printed figures is tied in a four-in-hand knot. It would appear his pocket square matches the tie. Matching the tie and pocket square is an unstylish faux pas, but it’s a rare moment that Roger Moore wears something in his breast pocket.

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The Short Car Coat

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In From Russia with Love, Bond finds a navy wool car coat and peaked cap in a SPECTRE agent’s truck to wear on his maritime escape from Trieste to Venice. His lightweight grey suit isn’t enough to keep him warm during his trip across the water. The hip-length coat just barely covers the suit jacket, so it’s not the best for wearing over a suit. In a way, the coat is like a single-breasted version of a pea coat, if only it had slash pockets instead of patch pockets. It has four buttons, with the top button at the base of the neck and the bottom at the top of the hip pockets. The hip pockets are open patch pockets. The coat has a yoke across the upper back, a vent in back, swelled edges and lapped seams.

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With the car coat Bond wears a black peaked cap with a gold anchor embroidered at the front. Is he wearing the cap to let people know he’s the captain of this boat, is he wearing it to keep his head warm, or is he wearing it just for fun?

Happy Anniversary 007: The Corduroy Trench Coat and Navy Blazer

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Roger Moore takes a look back at twenty five years of James Bond films in Happy Anniversary 007, a compilation of Bond clips that aired in 1987 shortly before the release of The Living Daylights. At 59 years old, Moore looks a little better than he did two years earlier in A View to a Kill, probably due to the darker hair die. He appears throughout to talk about the situations Bond faced in his past fourteen films, but he’s playing himself as if he were Bond. Apart from the killing, there was little difference between Roger Moore and the Bond character he played. Moore’s personal wardrobe at the time included clothes he wore as Bond along with other clothes by the same makers. In Happy Anniversary 007, Roger Moore wears some clothes that he had previously worn as Bond, but most of the tailored clothes are likely from his own wardrobe. I can’t imagine the budget for this would have room for Douglas Hayward tailoring that is used so sparingly. Moore wears a total of eight different outfits in this film.

A close-up of the corduroy

A close-up of the corduroy

Roger Moore wears a very interesting trench coat made in light brown corduroy, but it has practically all of the traditional trench coat details. It’s a full-length coat that hits just below the knee, and it has the raglan sleeves found on an ordinary trench coat. Also like an ordinary trench coat this coat has ten buttons on the front, but the buttons are brown leather that go well with the corduroy. The coat has usual trench coat details like shoulder straps, a yoke across the upper back, a storm flap in front, and a self belt and wrist straps that close with a leather buckles. The pockets are angled with large welts. The coat has a gold satin lining over the shoulders and upper back with a plaid lining the rest of the way down.

Corduroy, especially in the wide wale that this is, was very popular in the 1980s. Narrower wales have been more popular in the past decade, though the wider wale corduroy wears warmer. This coat is neither designed for the rain nor for the extreme cold but for the cool days of autumn. Thus Moore’s beige leather gloves are probably unlined. Corduroy also makes this coat too informal for a suit, but Roger Moore wears a blazer underneath.

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Roger Moore’s dark navy blazer is tailored by Douglas Hayward in the same fashion he made all of Moore’s clothes for his three James Bond films in the 1980s. It’s a button two, and unlike what was popular at the time this blazer has natural shoulders and a higher gorge (the seams where the collar and lapels meet). After Bond Roger Moore stopped following fashions and stuck with a classic style. The blazer has three buttons of the cuffs, and all the buttons are white metal. His trousers are dark grey flannel wool. Moore’s white shirt is not made by his usual—or perhaps former at this time—shirtmaker Frank Foster. It has a small, narrow button-down collar. Apart from it being a poor example of a button-down collar—see Cec Linder’s Felix Leiter in Goldfinger for a proper button-down collar—it’s not flattering to Moore either. The shirt has 1-button cuffs. And Moore ties his crimson satin tie in a four-in-hand knot. If Roger Moore was still Bond for one more film, is this how he would be dressed?

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Kristatos: The Suede Trench Coat

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Aris Kristatos, played by Julian Glover in For Your Eyes Only, keeps wearing a suede trench coat in warm grey. It’s a full-length coat that hits below the knee, but unlike most trench coats which have raglan sleeves, this has set-in sleeves. There are actually ten buttons like would be found on the standard trench coat, and the buttons are grey horn. The coat has the usual trench coat details like a self belt, shoulder straps and angled pockets with buttoned flaps. It has straps around the wrists that close with brass buckles instead of the typical leather. There are yokes across the upper back and upper chest for dryness during snowfall. Most trench coats instead have the yoke only in back and a storm flap in front.  The most noticeable part of this coat is the black fur on the collar and the revers. And for warmth, the coat is lined in black fur.

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Underneath the trench coat Kristatos wears an olive green double-breasted blazer. It has six white metal buttons with two to fasten. Under the blazer he wears a red cashmere polo neck jumper. The combination of the red jumper and the green blazer hints that Kirstatos is affiliated with the Soviets, something we don’t learn until later in the film. Green and red were often found together on Soviet military uniforms, just with the red limited to accents. We briefly see a little bit of his trousers, which appear to be light grey in a shade similar to the trench coat. Kristatos wears tan leather gloves, most likely lined with cashmere for warmth. Bond, Kristatos and Ferrara all politely remove their gloves to shake hands. Unless the weather is extremely frigid, gloves meant for warmth should be removed for a handshake.

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