Dinner with Kristatos


Last month I talked about Bond’s first notched-lapel dinner jacket in Goldfinger, and in For Your Eyes Only we first see Roger Moore in a notched-lapel dinner jacket out to dinner and the casino. Moore’s black dinner jacket has a one-button front, jetted pockets, 3-button cuffs and double vents. Typically the buttons on a dinner jacket are covered in silk matching the lapels, but here the buttons are black horn like those often found on a suit. The trousers have a silk stripe down the sides and are cut with a flat front and straight leg.


Bond’s shirt has a spread collar, rounded-corner double cuffs and a pleated front. The cloth is white cotton with a tonal stripe, making this shirt similar to the dress shirt in Goldfinger. The shirt has regular mother of pearl buttons down the front. We also see Bond wearing some sort of cummerbund (see picture below). It looks like it buttons on to the front of the trousers rather than wraps around the whole waist. But it serves the purpose of a cummerbund: to cover the waist.

9 thoughts on “Dinner with Kristatos

  1. A very nicely tailored dinner suit and Moore looks great while delivering (IMO) his best, and one of the best, performances as Bond. Is this the same dinner suit as the one he wears for dinner with Kamal Khan? I believe he wore the double-breasted one twice as well.

  2. I'll have to look more closely at the dinner suit in Octopussy to see if it was the same one reused. The double-breasted dinner suits in The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker may be the same, though since both saw a considerable amount of action it makes it less likely that the suits were reused.

  3. It's so clear to me now that his clothing flatters him much better in the '80s, especially as he gets into middle age. Not a fan of the hairstyle though. Notch lapels and weird faux-cummerbund notwithstanding, this is a solid black tie rig.

  4. Moore's 80's suits look better than the suits in the 70s simply because of the proportionate lapels and trouser legs. But I think that Cyril Castle's suits had a better fit than Haywards (which are still excellent). Moore's 80's hairstyle goes back to the hairstyle that Moore had in the 50s and 60s, which can best be described as swept to the side but not parted. He started parting it in the beginning of the 1970s, after a trendier hairstyle in 1969's Crossplot.

  5. I’m surprised that Moore/Hayward would make the minor mistakes of notch lapels and plastic buttons on the jacket sleeves, but other than that this is very nice.

    • Actually, neither are incorrect. Notch lapels are frowned upon by many, but they have been around almost as long as the dinner jacket has. They are acceptable for less formal occasions, like a simple dinner as Bond is enjoying here. These buttons are horn, not plastic, though plastic buttons are not incorrect either and have long been used on Savile Row for dinner suits. Some may consider horn’s rustic texture inappropriate on a dinner suit. Fabric-covered buttons aren’t necessary.

  6. One can also take into account that Corfu is an informal island, and that could be the reason they chose notched lapels for the Corfu Casino and dinner. I don’t like it on Connery’s black tie in Never say never though.

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