The Hacking Jacket

For country pursuits there’s nothing better than a tweed hacking jacket. This jacket from Goldfinger is made up in a brown barleycorn, which looks like a pattern of upward-pointing arrows. A detailed diagram of the fabric can be found in my article for almost identical hacking jacket Roger Moore wore in A View to a Kill. Traditionally cut with slanted hacking pockets, a ticket pocket and a long single vent, it was designed for horseback riding. Bond wears this with light brown narrow cut, flat front wool cavalry twill trousers with frogmouth pockets and plain hemmed bottoms. On his feet is the quintessential country footwear: brown suede shoes. These are derby shoes, very similar to chukka boots in a style John Lobb Ltd. calls hilo shoes. They look just like chukka boots in the front, but they are cut lower like derby shoes. Effectively, they are chukka shoes.

The same jacket and trousers appear again in Thunderball (see picture below). In Goldfinger he wears an ecru shirt with double cuffs and a light brown knit tie. In Thunderball he switches that out for a shirt with 2-button turnback cuffs and a dark brown grenadine tie.

Before Sean Connery wore the hacking jacket and cavalry twill trousers as James Bond, he wore it in Woman of Straw.

16 thoughts on “The Hacking Jacket

  1. First off, very good blog. I am glad someone did it! I admire the clothes in the early Bond films and had thought of doing a similar analysis, however your knowledge excels my own. I will be following this with interest : )

    Good observation with the re-used wardrobe. I was watching Thunderball a few weeks ago and noticed that they used the same brown blazer and trousers. I'm glad – the films were released one year apart and it would be an awful waste of beautiful clothes. It makes sense that the character would keep some of the same suits. I think there was another suit carried across between Goldfinger and Thunderball – was his dark grey 3 piece at the end scene of Goldfinger the same as the one seen in the opening of Thunderball?

    David C

  2. The dark grey flannel suits at the end of Goldfinger and beginning of Thunderball are very similar though different suits. The jackets are just about identical. The trousers in Thunderball have turn-ups whilst the trousers in Goldfinger don't. The biggest difference is in the waistcoats. The Goldfinger waistcoat is a normal 6 button with 5 to button, whereas the Thunderball waistcoat has a full 6-button front and is cut straight across the bottom.

  3. Matt,

    I believe these are not boots, but suede oxfords (or derbys, cannot tell). One can see this best in the scene were Bond briefly sits on the trunk of Tilly Masterson's car after she has run off of the road in Switzerland.

    S

  4. S, you are correct. They are derby shoes, though they are very much in the spirit of chukka boots. These shoes have typically been called chukka boots, even in Dressed to Kill: James Bond the Suited Hero. I've changed the article to reflect this.

  5. A favorite of mine. A nice example of how to dress rather casual but still very elegant.

    I prefer this style over the suit-without-a-tie look and the quite popular combination jeans and suit jacket.

    This outfit still works perfectly 50 years later.

    • I couldn’t agree more! This outfit beats the suit-without-tie attempt at dressy casual hands down!

    • It’s hard to tell from the film, but these cufflink probably look the same on both sides. Cufflinks back then were typically two pieces linked together with a chain, so no toggle. A cufflink of this type is easy to slide in and out of the holes. I have a very similar pair of cufflinks to these.

  6. I too have puzzled about the cuff links before because, as has been said, the exposed part looks like the inner toggle of a traditional silver chain linked set. I can finally confirm this is the case as you can see Bond is indeed wearing his cufflinks ‘inside-out’ so to speak, in this picture of him entering his Aston Martin at Stoke Park Golf Club.

    http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk1/Rich5ltr/Public%20images/HackingJacket2_zps04d186b9.jpg

  7. When re-watching Thunderball, I had to stop and look again at the (single) rear vent’s length – which has a depth that approaches that of many ’70s suits.

    Then I remembered it is a jacket for riding, after all. Wonder what the excuse was for when deep vents became the norm?

    -Kurt

    • You’re right that the colour is off. They look too light, though in the close-up photos the colour looks a little better. The side-adjusters on those trousers are not seen in either Goldfinger or Thunderball, so we don’t know what kind they are. They are most likely the same Daks tops as the suit trousers, but David Mason took the liberty of using a slide-buckle side-adjusters. I find that the slide buckle-type adjusters are more effective than Daks tops, which may have been the reason why they were used.

  8. I just re-watched the scenes in Goldfinger in which Bond wears this hacking jacket – it’s pure perfection! The outfit is casually elegant, and the structured, ever-so-slightly military cut of the jacket emphasizes the youthful Connery’s athletic build. For the life of me I can’t figure out why anybody would find hacking jackets “old-mannish”!

  9. It’s not a regular tweed jacket? It does indeed have slanted pockets, a ticket pocket and a long single vent, but I always thought a true hacking jacket had a 3 button front and a short lapel?

    • The original hacking jackets had three or four buttons, but so did the original lounge suits. If a lounge suit can have two buttons, so can a hacking jacket.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ 7 = thirteen

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>