A Quick Reference Guide to the Movies and Books

Here’s a simple reference guide to the James Bond films and books.

Films:

1. Dr. No (1962)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Terence Young

2. From Russia With Love (1963)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Terence Young

3. Goldfinger (1964)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Guy Hamilton

4. Thunderball (1965)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Terence Young

5. You Only Live Twice (1967)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Lewis Gilbert

6. On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)
George Lazenby as James Bond
directed by Peter Hunt

7. Diamonds Are Forever (1971)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Guy Hamilton

8. Live and Let Die (1973)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by Guy Hamilton

9. The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by Guy Hamilton

10. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by Lewis Gilbert

11. Moonraker (1979)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by Lewis Gilbert

12. For Your Eyes Only (1981)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by John Glen

13. Octopussy (1983)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by John Glen

14. A View to a Kill (1985)
Roger Moore as James Bond
directed by John Glen

15. The Living Daylights (1987)
Timothy Dalton as James Bond
directed by John Glen

16. Licence to Kill (1989)
Timothy Dalton as James Bond
directed by John Glen

17. GoldenEye (1995)
Pierce Brosnan as James Bond
directed by Martin Campbell

18. Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
Pierce Brosnan as James Bond
directed by Roger Spottiswoode

19. The World is Not Enough (1999)
Pierce Brosnan as James Bond
directed by Michael Apted

20. Die Another Day (2002)
Pierce Brosnan as James Bond
directed by Lee Tamahori

21. Casino Royale (2006)
Daniel Craig as James Bond
directed by Martin Campbell

22. Quantum of Solace (2008)
Daniel Craig as James Bond
directed by Marc Forster

23. Skyfall (2012)
Daniel Craig as James Bond
directed by Sam Mendes

Non-EON films:

Casino Royale (1953) from Climax!
Barry Nelson as James Bond
directed by William H. Brown Jr.

Casino Royale (1967)
David Niven, Peter Sellers and others as James Bond
directed by Ken Hughes, John Huston, Joseph McGrath, Robert Parrish and Richard Talmadge

Never Say Never Again (1983)
Sean Connery as James Bond
directed by Irvin Kershner

Books:

by Ian Fleming

Casino Royale (1953)

Live and Let Die
(1954)

Moonraker
(1955)

Diamonds Are Forever
(1956)

From Russia, with Love
(1957)

Doctor No
(1958)

Goldfinger
(1959)

For Your Eyes Only
(1960)
short story collection including “From a View to a Kill,” “For Your Eyes Only,” “Quantum of Solace,” “Risico” and “The Hilderbrand Rarity”

Thunderball
(1961) (based on a screen treatment by Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham, and Ian Fleming)

The Spy Who Loved Me
(1962)

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
(1963)

You Only Live Twice
(1964)

The Man with the Golden Gun
(1965)

Octopussy and The Living Daylights
(1966)
short story collection including “Octopussy” and “The Living Daylights”
“The Property of a Lady” added in 1967
“007 in New York added in 2002

19 thoughts on “A Quick Reference Guide to the Movies and Books

  1. Hi JON,
    My favourite film is On Her Majesty's Secret Service. It has a great story and great script, and the actors are all excellent except for George Lazenby. But at least Lazenby had a great tailor and looked the part.

  2. You and I must be long lost brothers. Everyone gives me blank stares when I tell them my favourite is OHMSS. If Connery had stayed in the part for one more, OHMSS would get the credit and praise it deserves. I also vote for Lazenby's style as my favourite. And believe it or not, Telly Savalas is my fav of all Blofelds.

    But I get shivers thinking about how incredible the film wouldve been with Connery, or even Roger Moore.

    • OHMSS is the definitive Bond movie, it has everything that makes Bond great, and an awesome score. All Bond fans know this,but everyone else will look at you like you’re crazy.

    • OHMSS is the best film of the series, IMHO.
      I have discussed the film for years with Bond fans all over the globe, and most agree that OHMSS WITH Connery would not have been the film it was. In 1968, Connery was fed up, overweight, and lazy.
      At least GL tried in ernest to give a good performance. Most Bond fans fantasize about OHMSS with a different cast, and, really, the cast that Peter Hunt ended up with could not be duplicated. I doubt that Briget Bardot would have equalled Diana Rigg’s Tracy.
      The soudtrack for the film I alos think is the absolute best of the series, and even David Arnold admits that!
      Here’s to my fellow OHMSS enthusiasts. You may enjoy my OHMSS Aston Martin site: OHMSSDBS.com

    • Clearly I’m a Bond fan siding with the majority on OHMSS. I dream of a Craig-Mendes remake of it. Who would play Tracy Bond today? Diana Rigg was glamorous in the role….

  3. GoldenEye was good, but I have such a problem with the terrible musical score that it nearly ruins the entire film for me. Had David Arnold composed it, it would be fantastic. Eric Serra's weird techno crap ruins the whole "Bond" feel.

  4. JON, that's exactly the way I feel about GoldenEye. Had John Barry agreed to do GoldenEye it would've been a much better film to me. I find that a lot of young people like GoldenEye because they confuse the movie with the video game. It made a better video game than movie.

  5. I have fantastic memories from junior high of playing GoldenEye for hours after school, but unfortunately it doesnt change my opinion of the film. Also, Brosnan seemed a bit uncomfortable, a bit too stiff. He was much better in Tomorrow Never Dies and really came into his own with The World Is Not Enough.

  6. I think George Lazenby would've grown into the role of Bond. The story in OHMSS (very little removed to that of the book) requires James Bond to fall in love. For an inexperienced 29 year old non actor taking over the role I think Lazenby acquitted himself quite well. Better in fact than some of the actual actors who later adopted the role.

    OHMSS is, for Lazenby, it's story line (one of the best Fleming novels)fellow actors and locations, a one off. A special entry in the 007 canon

  7. Unfortunately I felt Lazenby brought OHMSS down too much. It wasn't quite a "The Matrix" situation either. Keanu Reeves isn't much of an actor, but he was very committed to the fight choreography and stoic/inoffensive enough that the movie still worked. (Can you tell I really like that movie? :P)

    I think another thing that killed OHMSS in the public's eye was the marketing. They tried to downplay the fact that Sean Connery wasn't returning. It turned out to be a terrible decision for a number of reasons.

  8. Goldeneye's score is unfairly maligned in my opinion. But, then I've always been a fan of Eric Serra's work in "Léon" and "The Fifth Element."

  9. Though it’s not my favourite I’m a big fan of OHMSS and I don’t think Lazenby let the film down at all. He had everything against him from the start: the first to follow the supposedly irreplaceable Connery and a lot of clucking critics and fans determined to make noise about it; lack of acting experience; the technical gaff of choosing to dub his voice as Sir Hilary Bray.

    Most people agree that he shined in the action scenes and that his wardrobe was largely good. He’s a worse actor than Daniel Craig, but had far better ‘Bond presence’ than the current pouting, hyperactive incumbent.
    Moore had considerable acting experience and yet he was also sometimes a bit wooden, the reviews of Lazenby are really just a lot of accumulated repetition. I think he did well in the the film and I accept him as a legitimate Bond without reserve.

  10. Dr No and Live and Let Die have particular significnce to me, as I lived in Jamaica at the time of the filming, and learned to sail where filming took place around Kingston harbour. I believe the Kinston hotels used in Dr No have been demolished and tourist trade development has taken its toll on other areas.

    Live and Let Die was particularly popular in Jamaica when it came out, both for its use of the island and the wonderful New Orleans characters that appealed to the Jamaican sense of flash and style.

  11. I’ve enjoyed reading your posts about the James Bond’s clothes. Since my teens, (quite a while ago), I’ve found mens’ fashion interesting.

    And although I can well understand why Sean Connery so embodied the character, MY favourite was Timothy Dalton–in Living Daylights, not so much in Licence to Kill. Quite apart from how closely he portayed Bond, as Fleming wrote him…and those considerations that are often mentioned when debating which actor played the best Bond…I just thought he looked yummy!! And wore his clothes well!

  12. OHMSS works because of the complete love interest v. passing love interests of Bond. It moves him from the position of serial womaniser to a more mature man who is at ease with a more definitive relationship. His sense of adventure and duty are mirrored by Tracy she is the balance that enables him, as a character, to move past the stereotypical loner to a fuller, rounded character. As for Lazenby v. the rest his relaxed, non English style lends itself to this character move. I wonder whether the others would have achieved this so easily.

  13. And the decade winner is the 60s,with 6 movies (i not count the spoof “Casino Royal”.
    Then the 80s with 6 movies (i count “Never said never again” also because there is Connery).
    70s with 6 movies
    90s and 200s have only 3 movies each.
    And 1 movie only for 2010s.

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